Games you just couldn't get into - but feel like you should

Anyone have games like that?

Right now I am dumping Like A Dragon: Infinite Wealth because I just don't feel it somehow but it is everything I love about games - great story, interesting characters, fund combat, etc.
But I felt the same way about the first one too so why don't I learn?
In fact I have bought LaD on the Xbox and the Steam Deck over the years because I am just convinced that I will like it.

I hope I am not alone in this problem

King of Dragon Pass - I should love this game, and I bounce off every time I tried

Crusader Kings II - lightning in a bottle according to zillions, and I just can't get past the quirky UI, and the 'there is no game, just a story'-feeling.

The whole Civ / Homm series after part III, the moment they left the beautiful isometric graphics for these sh*tty 3D stuff, I kind of lose interest.

Elite Dangerous / No Man's Sky - I have a limited game time and want to relax... and I never got through the tutorial with these juggernauts.

Planet Coaster - another one I should love, played the hack out of RCT, RCT2 and OpenRCT... and this one.. I just can't get it done.

Seems I am an old isometric geezer, the whole 3D stuff is beyond me,.

For me -and my son liking them made me get more interested- Pokemon Games I just can't
FORTNITE... I want to see what my son does etc... but i just don't like it and never will.

I once recently tried sports games (FIFA, MADDEN), and nope simply no.
I have also limited time and i want to play what grabs me early on (Like Dragon's Dogma)

Which country did you start with in CK3, Peoj? And which timeframe? What sort of leader did you pick.

There's definitely a game there, but it's the inverse of EU3. It's not a paint-the-map game (although some few are good enough to do that), it's a relationship management, resource management, and devious take-advantage-of-your-enemies-and-annoying-family game. It's about trying to head off a rebellion from your Steward and the motley band of nobles he's running with, while also seeing if you can keep your heir from becoming a depressed psychopath, carrying on an affair to increase your prestige but also trying to keep your wife from leaving you and taking important relations with her. And so much more. There may be an illness going around, should you hire that dodgy Estonian midwife who has been hanging around the court, or will she just endanger everyone with her "treatments"? Now that you've conquered another duchy, oops you're over the limit that your nobles think you can handle - who will you give feudal control over them to, and how will that affect the other nobles feelings? Will the new Duke feel like he should be King instead of you? And where are you going to get the money to upgrade your home city defenses? Maybe you should spend a season partying with your Court Advisors, and what the hell is your cousin doing, asking you to send troops to pull his ass out of the fire in Hanover? Time to rethink alliances... Oh, and now the Court is alive with rumors of witches and Satanic rituals in your wife's entourage... If only the Bishop was not bugging you for more Earthly power, he might be willing to help you try to head off *that* craziness, but are you willing to give up a province to the Church, effectively - or to his own Dynasty, realistically, to secure his loyalty? *Those* things are the game lol

Elden Ring.

Or any "Souls-like" game for that matter. I can see the quality and path ahead so clearly in that game, but I just can't commit to them.

Crusader Kings 3 was initially fun for me, and I enjoyed it for a few dozen hours, but most of the Paradox games have this increasing complexity scale where they start pretty straightforward for me but just keep throwing in more DLC, new systems, mechanics, content, and so on, that a game I previously enjoyed just becomes a hassle to stay on top of. Stellaris is another great example of this. I enjoyed both of these games for a while but the longer you stay away from them the harder that update hill is to climb back up again.

Budo wrote:

Elden Ring.

Or any "Souls-like" game for that matter. I can see the quality and path ahead so clearly in that game, but I just can't commit to them.

Crusader Kings 3 was close for me, and I enjoyed it for a few dozen hours, but most of the Paradox games have this increasing complexity scale where they just keep throwing in more DLC, new systems, mechanics and so on, that a game I previously enjoyed just becomes a hassle to stay on top of. Stellaris is a great example of this. I enjoyed both of these games but the longer you stay away from them the harder that update hill is to climb.

Can you please devleop why you "cant" commit to games like Elden Ring?
That game REALLY interests me and I plan to play it sometime in 2024

Budo wrote:

Elden Ring.

Or any "Souls-like" game for that matter. I can see the quality and path ahead so clearly in that game, but I just can't commit to them.

I agree with that. It requires you get some muscle memory for dodging, drinking a potion, while watching stamina, etc. that isn't so much hard as precise. So if you have in your head a different button press you need to really get over it but it requires commitment.

Mmmmmmmm im getting "scare" lol.
I tried Dark Souls or Demon souls, cant remember which one a couple of times some years ago and failed

Budo wrote:

Elden Ring.

Or any "Souls-like" game for that matter. I can see the quality and path ahead so clearly in that game, but I just can't commit to them.

Crusader Kings 3 was initially fun for me, and I enjoyed it for a few dozen hours, but most of the Paradox games have this increasing complexity scale where they start pretty straightforward for me but just keep throwing in more DLC, new systems, mechanics, content, and so on, that a game I previously enjoyed just becomes a hassle to stay on top of. Stellaris is another great example of this. I enjoyed both of these games for a while but the longer you stay away from them the harder that update hill is to climb back up again.

Elden Ring is the easiest and most forgiving souls game in my opinion and an it's an incredible experience from start to finish. I would strongly recommend giving it another go. The Fextralife wiki site is a great resource if you want a guide to help get oriented with the game early on and I would also suggest watching Fightin' Cowboy's first and second walkthrough videos on YouTube as well. Once you get going, you'll be fine.

The most recent example for me is Alan Wake 2. It looks amazing, I like the lore and characters are interesting but I hated every minute of it. The movement is excessively slow, tons of backtracking and shooting mechanics seem wonky. I really wanted to love it but ended up getting a refund from MS, which is something I had never done up until that point.

Is Bloodborne more difficult than Elden Ring. (Since I own it so I might give it a try before Elden Ring)

Bloodborne is a more fast paced game than Elden Ring and the Dark Souls games, so some might call it more difficulty. The beginning of is quite difficult in my opinion, especially if you've never played one of those games before. Lots of enemies, difficult to navigate areas, and you have to go quite a ways before opening up your first real shortcut. Also, most players won't be able to level up until they reach one of two bosses, which, again, takes a while to get to when you're first starting out.

If you can make it over those initial hurdles, it's an incredibly rewarding game in terms of action, lore, and level design. But it will test you.

OMG... well thanks for the tip.
I have other games before I even consider it

FF16 mostly
But thanks again

More games than I care to try to recall. But some in particular that hurt a bit to give up on more recently:

Sekiro - I've played through Dark Souls 1-3 and Bloodborne, most of them through multiple characters and/or New Game+ runs. But Sekiro took away the "safety net" of defensive play like Bloodborne and then took it one step further by effectively taking away the player's ability to grind levels to compensate for player skill limits.

Gorgeous game. Sublime design. But just too hard in ways I couldn't quite overcome.

Elden Ring - Same disclaimer as Sekiro, but different obstacle: the world & quest design is even more opaque and puzzling than the prior Souls games (and Bloodborne/Sekiro). The idea of an "open world" Souls-like was quite appealing in concept, but at least in this form of execution, just didn't jive with me. I spent far more time wandering around trying to figure out where to reasonably advance (and struggling to understand what I was even advancing) than I did trying to overcome challenges.

Turns out I simply prefer my Soulslike gameplay in a more directly-inspired Metroidvania style.

Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun - I suck at RTS style gameplay and struggle to enjoy it as it is, but tried to stick with this one in spite of that because I loved the concept and design so much. But on top of the gameplay itself being an obstacle to me, the difficulty was just too finicky and demanding for an uncreative tactician like me.

I don't even want to admit how long it took to get through the tutorial, and that should been all the warning I needed.

Romancing SaGa 3 - I've tried to get into this one several times since the remasters released, even following some guides for unlocking locations/quests, but the game (especially the party/combat mechanics) is just too opaque for me. I enjoyed the old Game Boy SaGa games, and more recently Legend of Legacy and Alliance Alive on the 3DS, so I wanted to finally experience the SNES era SaGa games, but it just isn't connecting with me.

Armored Core VI - I'm noticing a trend on this list in recent years. Love the game's design, really want to love it, but it's just too damn hard for me and I don't have the patience these days to "git gud".

Nioh - Oh look, another once I gave another real shot and found that it's simply too challenging to be fun for me despite my appreciation for the game's design.

Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy - And another. You think I'd learn my lesson by now.

There's more, this is just a cursory recollection from the past couple years.

Farscry wrote:

Elden Ring complaints

Elden Ring has graces, which are bright golden save points spread across the map and a bunch of them point in the direction that you are intended to trave for the main story. At a very basic level you just move from each grace and don't have to go crazy exploring. You can do as much or as little as you want in terms of venturing but the game is very good at rewarding exploration with incredible areas, bosses and gear.

I'll tell you that I've been gaming for over 40 years, have played a sh*t ton of games and Elden Ring is top 3 all time. It's one of the very few games that nails everything in my opinion and one of the only games I've played that kept me hooked from the beginning to end with about 150+ hours invested. Legendary game all around and worth giving another shot.

I would suggest watching the 1st/2nd walkthrough videos from Fightin'Cowboy on YouTube and that will get you familiarized with game quickly and save you any early frustration.

Control - Everything pointed to me loving this, yet it just wasn't fun to play.

I keep bouncing off the Witcher 2.
I couldn't stay interested in Kerbal Space Program.
I wanted to love Space Engineers but it just wouldn't let me.

93_confirmed wrote:
Farscry wrote:

Elden Ring complaints

Elden Ring has graces, which are bright golden save points spread across the map and a bunch of them point in the direction that you are intended to trave for the main story. At a very basic level you just move from each grace and don't have to go crazy exploring. You can do as much or as little as you want in terms of venturing but the game is very good at rewarding exploration with incredible areas, bosses and gear.

Yeah, I know about the Graces, but for a scrub like me the exploration and gearing/leveling up is effectively necessary to not hit difficulty roadblocks.

93_confirmed wrote:

I'll tell you that I've been gaming for over 40 years, have played a sh*t ton of games and Elden Ring is top 3 all time. It's one of the very few games that nails everything in my opinion and one of the only games I've played that kept me hooked from the beginning to end with about 150+ hours invested. Legendary game all around and worth giving another shot.

To be clear, I'm not knocking the quality of the game -- I put in over 40 hours all told and I'll give it another shot eventually. And that's not counting the time spent digging into the wiki to figure out places to go that were all too easy to miss since trying to explore organically was leaving me feeling too aimless -- and this coming from someone who adores Breath of the Wild and Tears of the Kingdom.

I've only been gaming for about 35-40 years (hard to pinpoint when is really the start -- basic arcade/Atari stuff, or meatier games?), so maybe that's the problem?

When Elden Ring was really engaging me, it really engaged me. But something about its open-endedness combined with Miyazaki's penchant for burying the story and lore between the lines left me too frequently having no direction or purpose. Maybe just a matter of where my mind and place in life were over the last two years just not being a good match for the game at the time. I'm hopeful that I can return to it in the future and find that it grabs me more. Wouldn't be the first time that's happened -- there've been several games in the past that I bounced off of initially but then returned a couple years later and ended up obsessively enjoying them (Witcher 3, Alien Isolation, Total War).

I loved Elden Ring. Personally, I think it would've been an even better game if the open world were scaled back a ton and it was made into a more focused "multiple parallel path" experience. But then that would just be a Souls game, not Elden Ring; I'm fine letting it be its own thing.

I bounced pretty hard off of Tchia recently. Something about the tone or the vibe just didn't work for me. I've heard a lot of good things about it, but it didn't click with me.

The Witcher 1 took me three attempts before it clicked, but it eventually did. There have been a few other cases where it took me a few times before I finished a game.

Baldur's Gate I finished, but I sure didn't enjoy it. I love RPGs, along with Dragon Age in particular, but Baldur's Gate in particular just felt too old and clunky to enjoy. I've had no desire to play Baldur's Gate 2, and it put me off of even wanting to play BG3 until it came out and the reviews and player experiences were so glowing.

BG3 is nothing like BG1 and BG2. So don't hold off on the one because of the others. Its like not playing WoW because you didn't like Warcraft 3.

I think the key here is that it is really easy to have one or two things that make you bounce off games. It really is rare that special game that holds your interest and merits multiple play throughs.

I mean take BG3 which was so awesome but I never got very far in it. I put probably 80 hours in and only just dabbled in act 2. So while things like difficulty and control or UI jank are typical culprits, length really is too.

And difficulty isn't just too hard or not. Its the curve and any anomalous bumps along the way. I have noped out of so many games because an early boss had mechanics I couldn't grock. There are also games I've noped out of in the tutorial because of confusion or unnecessarily complex completion requirements.

And then there are games that I couldn't play at launch but a new game mode or mechanic in the first DLC or expansion turned things around completely. (I'm looking at you HBS Battletech)

fangblackbone wrote:

BG3 is nothing like BG1 and BG2. So don't hold off on the one because of the others. Its like not playing WoW because you didn't like Warcraft 3.

Oh I'm well aware now, but when it was in early access I simply had no interest in even looking into it. It didn't help that I bounced off of Divinity: Original Sin as well, so I wasn't keen to give Larian a chance with a property I wasn't interested when they hadn't won me over in their own games.

I'll definitely be playing BG3 at some point, but it'll likely be after they're done patching it and any expansions come out.

beanman101283 wrote:
fangblackbone wrote:

BG3 is nothing like BG1 and BG2. So don't hold off on the one because of the others. Its like not playing WoW because you didn't like Warcraft 3.

Oh I'm well aware now, but when it was in early access I simply had no interest in even looking into it. It didn't help that I bounced off of Divinity: Original Sin as well, so I wasn't keen to give Larian a chance with a property I wasn't interested when they hadn't won me over in their own games.

I'll definitely be playing BG3 at some point, but it'll likely be after they're done patching it and any expansions come out.

I bounced off D:OS 1 and 2 hard. Played 1 for like 20 hours, Played 2 for like 45 hours. But I'd get distracted and just bounce off. I never got into the story.

BG3 is different. I've been playing it since release. Finally in Act 3. I think the Dungeon and Dragons aspect of it is far more interesting than Divinity lore. And I'm not really a D&D fan. Beat BG 1 years ago which I loved. Bounced off BG2. And haven't really played any D&D games since then, with the occasional 1 hour trials of other Infinity Engine games.

I bounced off D:OS 1 so hard that I skipped D:OS 2 and was very concerned about BG3. I bought the early access early though after watching some combat gameplay.
I also thoroughly enjoyed the little I played of D:OS 2 (years after release) I lost interest 10-15 hours in because something bigger and shinier came out. I may go back to it. It is distinct enough from BG3 and I really liked the mechanics of the class I picked. (conjurer? the one where you create summons from nearby elements in the environments)

The biggest one of these games for me is Crusader Kings 3.

I love strategy games. I love hours-long history podcasts about the Plantagenets. I love hearing other people's CK3 stories. I get a giggle from Reddit CK3 subfolder titles like "So I ate the Pope".

But every time I try to play myself, I bounce off. I wish I knew why, because on paper this should be my favourite game. Maybe it's because there's more than just the juicy dynastic relationship stuff, maybe because I never got the hang of the military systems. I just drown in the micro-management: too many nested tooltips outlining choices that add 0.5% to something or other, without knowing what's best.

I'm pretty sure that if Outer Wilds was just a little bit less finicky and awkward to get around in, I too would be one of the cool kids singing its praises. Love the concept but I've started it three times now and never made it to the end. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to chase down a clue only to be spiked/suffocated/crushed/whatever again and again.

Robear wrote:

Which country did you start with in CK3, Peoj? And which timeframe? What sort of leader did you pick.

There's definitely a game there, but it's the inverse of EU3. It's not a paint-the-map game (although some few are good enough to do that), it's a relationship management, resource management, and devious take-advantage-of-your-enemies-and-annoying-family game. It's about trying to head off a rebellion from your Steward and the motley band of nobles he's running with, while also seeing if you can keep your heir from becoming a depressed psychopath, carrying on an affair to increase your prestige but also trying to keep your wife from leaving you and taking important relations with her. And so much more. There may be an illness going around, should you hire that dodgy Estonian midwife who has been hanging around the court, or will she just endanger everyone with her "treatments"? Now that you've conquered another duchy, oops you're over the limit that your nobles think you can handle - who will you give feudal control over them to, and how will that affect the other nobles feelings? Will the new Duke feel like he should be King instead of you? And where are you going to get the money to upgrade your home city defenses? Maybe you should spend a season partying with your Court Advisors, and what the hell is your cousin doing, asking you to send troops to pull his ass out of the fire in Hanover? Time to rethink alliances... Oh, and now the Court is alive with rumors of witches and Satanic rituals in your wife's entourage... If only the Bishop was not bugging you for more Earthly power, he might be willing to help you try to head off *that* craziness, but are you willing to give up a province to the Church, effectively - or to his own Dynasty, realistically, to secure his loyalty? *Those* things are the game lol

It was CK2, not CK3, nevertheless - it just doesn't click with me. But it appears that a lot of the Paradox-brand don't click with me (Stellaris for example). Which is a good thing: the company has a certain stamp and I avoid it. They have quality, just not for me.

A few of mine:

Armored Core 6: I love mechs! I love customizing mechs! But I really hate the boss fights.

No Man's Sky: I love space exploration! But I hate the survival mechanics.

Control: I loved the X-Files! But the controls and combat just refused to click for me.

Assassin's Creed Black Flag: I want to be a pirate! But I rage-quit the stealth tutorial repeatedly and never got any further.

Every 4X that I've tried since Civ V: I got married and stopped spending most of my evenings in front of a gaming computer.

Lol yes marriage also "changed" my gaming habits, hours and games I can play. I also like civ games

misplacedbravado wrote:

A few of mine:

No Man's Sky: I love space exploration! But I hate the survival mechanics.

I would've said this one too, but it has a creative mode which turns off the survival stuff, but keeps the story and mission stuff! Check it out!