NFL 2022: The preseason pre-draft thread

*Legion* wrote:
MilkmanDanimal wrote:

I'm starting to think maybe Calvin Ridley might not be the smartest guy in the room

This is just going to add to the "stigmatism" of an Alabama education...

*bookmarked for future use in college football thread*

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet. Not sure I get the outrage other than you can’t bet.

In the grand scheme of fixing games this seems pretty tame.

TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

*Legion* wrote:

He ran a very fast 40 (4.58)

Boye Mafe was faster. Just sayin'.

iaintgotnopants wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

He ran a very fast 40 (4.58)

Boye Mafe was faster. Just sayin'.

Gee I wonder what school he went to...

At least we know he has good taste.

*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

For a $1500 bet? I mean I know the salaries are low on some of the guys on the team but I can’t imagine you would have guys throwing games for that kind of bet.

TheGameguru wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

For a $1500 bet? I mean I know the salaries are low on some of the guys on the team but I can’t imagine you would have guys throwing games for that kind of bet.

No, probably not in this case, but I think scenarios like that are why the league responds the way they do, and why "he was out, he wasn't even in the game" isn't accepted as a defense.

Also, you don't have to throw entire games, not in a world of point spreads, over/unders, daily fantasy, and hyper-specific prop bets that go way beyond just wins and losses.

*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

For a $1500 bet? I mean I know the salaries are low on some of the guys on the team but I can’t imagine you would have guys throwing games for that kind of bet.

No, probably not in this case, but I think scenarios like that are why the league responds the way they do, and why "he was out, he wasn't even in the game" isn't accepted as a defense.

Also, you don't have to throw entire games, not in a world of point spreads, over/unders, daily fantasy, and hyper-specific prop bets that go way beyond just wins and losses.

Lets face it they can do that and not actually place the bets themselves.. just not sure the league is really cracking down on anything meaningful here.

*Legion* wrote:
iaintgotnopants wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

He ran a very fast 40 (4.58)

Boye Mafe was faster. Just sayin'.

Gee I wonder what school he went to...

Unfortunately, he didn't play the last time the Gophers played Fresno State so I don't have any highlights to post.

TheGameguru wrote:
*Legion* wrote:

No, probably not in this case, but I think scenarios like that are why the league responds the way they do, and why "he was out, he wasn't even in the game" isn't accepted as a defense.

Also, you don't have to throw entire games, not in a world of point spreads, over/unders, daily fantasy, and hyper-specific prop bets that go way beyond just wins and losses.

Lets face it they can do that and not actually place the bets themselves.. just not sure the league is really cracking down on anything meaningful here.

I think the issue here is that Ridley's activity was a blatant and egregious a breach of the NFL's rules. Among other things, he placed at least one bet on the Team that he plays for. I cannot find any information on the type of bets he was placing, but it doesn't matter. Players betting on games is certain "to undermine or put at risk the integrity" of the League. The League had to go in 'two-footed' (as they say in soccer).

To your point about supplying information to other individuals, who then place bets on the players or their own behalf... Well, two people means a conspiracy... probably a criminal one. At that point, I'd guess that RICO laws would come in to play, and we'd probably be talking about indefinite suspensions while criminal investigations/prosecutions took place, followed - potentially - by permanent bans from the League, no?

TheGameguru wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

For a $1500 bet? I mean I know the salaries are low on some of the guys on the team but I can’t imagine you would have guys throwing games for that kind of bet.

Well, more than 53 once you count in coaches.

And it is the slippery slope. He not only bet on the NFL (which in theory he could more easily have friends and connections than, say, a MLB game), he bet on his team. How much longer till someone bets on a game that he is playing in?

And then, the perception problem comes up. Did he drop that easy touchdown so the Falcons could cover? Is he dropping that pass because he has parleyed his YAC? Is he being pressured to do so because he (or an associate) has debts to the wrong people?

And if this sounds like problems from 50+ years ago when only seedy people in Vegas gambled, you're right. But somehow it is worse now because the NFL (and every other organized sports league) is trying to make gambling safe and legit and turn it into a revenue stream. And you can't have 1) teams throwing games, 2) people involved in the games (whether playing or officiating) betting on games, or 3) a tacit emotion that the league would prefer some teams (like Dallas) to be good and others (like Jaxonville) to be bad because that would affect peoples willingness to gamble on the games.

You mean something like the league breaking its own rules to move a team to LA, paying 3/4 of a billion dollars to say sorry to the city it screwed and then that team in LA winning the super bowl?

Favoritism like that?

Stele wrote:

You mean something like the league breaking its own rules to move a team to LA, paying 3/4 of a billion dollars to say sorry to the city it screwed and then that team in LA winning the super bowl?

Favoritism like that?

Something like that.

UpToIsomorphism wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:

I mean he wasn’t even active when he placed the bet.

It's not like he had 53 potential men-on-the-inside or anything...

For a $1500 bet? I mean I know the salaries are low on some of the guys on the team but I can’t imagine you would have guys throwing games for that kind of bet.

Well, more than 53 once you count in coaches.

And it is the slippery slope. He not only bet on the NFL (which in theory he could more easily have friends and connections than, say, a MLB game), he bet on his team. How much longer till someone bets on a game that he is playing in?

And then, the perception problem comes up. Did he drop that easy touchdown so the Falcons could cover? Is he dropping that pass because he has parleyed his YAC? Is he being pressured to do so because he (or an associate) has debts to the wrong people?

And if this sounds like problems from 50+ years ago when only seedy people in Vegas gambled, you're right. But somehow it is worse now because the NFL (and every other organized sports league) is trying to make gambling safe and legit and turn it into a revenue stream. And you can't have 1) teams throwing games, 2) people involved in the games (whether playing or officiating) betting on games, or 3) a tacit emotion that the league would prefer some teams (like Dallas) to be good and others (like Jaxonville) to be bad because that would affect peoples willingness to gamble on the games.

Again how is this any different than what anyone can do today.. if anything having bets out in the open seems to be a wise approach.. IF they bet at least you can see their bets.. its like a teenager with strict parents.. they are going to do it so you might as well build a safe place so they do it in the open and not behind your back.

It's also super frustrating to see the NFL crack down so hard on this and other offenses and give a game or two for domestic violence.

Imagine this headline on Sunday Morning:

Doesn't look good: Lawrence puts 3Gs on Bills-4 over Jags.

UpToIsomorphism wrote:

Imagine this headline on Sunday Morning:

Doesn't look good: Lawrence puts 3Gs on Bills-4 over Jags.

Again you can easily just make it that you can't bet on any team to win but your own.

TheGameguru wrote:
UpToIsomorphism wrote:

Imagine this headline on Sunday Morning:

Doesn't look good: Lawrence puts 3Gs on Bills-4 over Jags.

Again you can easily just make it that you can't bet on any team to win but your own.

In the world of point spreads that doesn't really help. Winning but not covering then becomes a problem somehow.

The goal of sports is win or lose (sometimes tie) on the scoreboard. But gambling has different parameters for winning and losing.

So a way to get around the salary cap:

I could go to the Panthers who are willing to pay me $500,000 a season more to be an inside LB and be a vet leader for a young team, or I could go to the Bills, take a haircut off the top, and bet on the team to win to make up for it!

You could allow players to bet on any team other than their own, but you could do lots of things. I'm 100% fine with Ridley's suspension and betting on football should result in a year suspension in all cases. Literally zero problems with that, and the whataboutism is pointless. Rule #1 of professional sports is "don't bet on your own sport", and it should have the largest penalties for a player you can give.

And, yes, there's some hypocrisy here with the NFL's embrace of gambling, but the NFL actively lobbied against legalizing gambling because I presume they're aware of the risk of Pulling A Ridley, and basically shrugged and decided they were going to make money off it once it was legal. None of that changes the fact that players are told explicitly and repeatedly "if you gamble on football games, you're screwed".

Damned Woke Mob strikes again.

Don't bet on the sport you are paid to play. It's basically insider trading. If you must bet, just keep it internal between teammates.

What changed between the Packers and Rodgers? It looked like everyone wanted to go their separate ways and then they decide to offer him all the money. So the Jordan Love pick was a waste regardless of the return.

Blargh.

I was ready for the reboot.

Can't really blame the front office though. Even for a team that doesn't have a meddling owner they are always going to lean what keeps my job safe. The Packers winning the NFC North for 4 more years is pretty safe job security.

Qaaron breaks up with his girlfriend that doesn't want to live in Green Bay, signs with GB.

Can he put like $3,000 on the Packers pre-season opener?

Vector wrote:

What changed between the Packers and Rodgers?

What changed is that Rodgers got dumped by Shailene Woodley over his football career. Wanting to move was in large part because of Shailene. Denver was the target because Shailene lives in Boulder.

Updated headline; Aaron Rodgers pre-paid $38.25 million guaranteed for each future NFC Championship Game loss.

Niners will probably end up 7-0 against him in the playoffs by the time this is over. Good stuff.

The NFL salary cap for 2022 has officially been set to $208.2 million.

Green Bay has the second worst cap situation, $26m in the red.

Rodgers' deal will almost certainly reduce his $46.6m cap hit in 2022, but by how much is the question.

Panthers might be willing to trade McCaffery is the rumor.

This is my attempt to divert the conversation from the Packers Rodgers.

It's early in the day still though so someone could still get banned or something for gambling on games. That already happened this week?

I do find the idea of the Panthers being willing to trade CMC amusing; I'm sure the market for RBs that have played ten games over the course of two years is just huge. Gonna be a great return on that one, and nothing would ensure another great year of HEY DARNOLD like that.