Help me build my PC: 2024 Catch-All

Go go go!
IMAGE(https://theilluminerdi.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/wonder-twins-superfriends.jpeg)

Good luck! I'm sure you've done it, but there are a lot of videos on building PCs. Wouldn't be suprised if you found one with your specific case/mobo/cooler combo or at least 2 of out of those 3.

I used these two that were close enough:

which is at least the same case as yours.

Also, don't forget to have a usb drive with whatever essential applications you want. I don't use ninite installer, but it at least provides a strong starting point of what are "common" must have, and mostly open source applications.

https://ninite.com/

So it is all built, and the power starts and all the fans are spinning, but nothing else.

A light pops up and then moves over to the right.

https://imgur.com/gallery/JfbGKUQ

The internet says it can take 5-10 minutes the first time a new system boots up, so I reseated everything and will start it and let it run.

Start with minimum equipment then try to boot.
Gradually add more stuff in until it boots or you find the culprit.

I need to put this in the top post:

*Legion* wrote:

If there's one piece of advice I could give PC builders, it is to BENCH TEST YOUR NEW SH*T. You will save yourself a lot of grief compared to shoving all the new parts into a complete system, turning it on, and then stabbing around in the dark trying to figure out why it doesn't boot. Too many variables!

For a complete brand new build, that would be starting off with CPU, motherboard, RAM, and video card only, outside the case (use the motherboard box for a platform if you don’t have a test bench frame).

And ideally, use an existing known-working video card instead of the new one first, and a known working power supply instead of the new one.

And if possible, known working RAM instead of the new stuff, but that’s harder for people that don’t have a stash of spare parts, especially if their previous build is on the other side of a DDR generation change.

Basically, start with the smallest possible number of new variables, get it to boot, then incrementally add/change one thing and verify it still boots at every step.

Memory training is a thing on DDR5 platforms, and that can mean a reboot cycle and a long delay before getting first video, which throws people off and is a really user-unfriendly way of designing things. PC component makers really should have thought twice about that.

The only thing I have plugged in right now is 1 stick of RAM (which I have in slot 2 according to the MB instructions). I removed the graphics card, which is the only other things I had plugged in.

*Legion* wrote:

For a complete brand new build, that would be starting off with CPU, motherboard, RAM, and video card only, outside the case (use the motherboard box for a platform if you don’t have a test bench frame).

And ideally, use an existing known-working video card instead of the new one first, and a known working power supply instead of the new one.

And if possible, known working RAM instead of the new stuff, but that’s harder for people that don’t have a stash of spare parts, especially if their previous build is on the other side of a DDR generation change.

Basically, start with the smallest possible number of new variables, get it to boot, then incrementally add/change one thing and verify it still boots at every step.

I didn't have any of that, and I didn't want to tear apart my working PC to throw it into my new PC.

Memory training is a thing on DDR5 platforms, and that can mean a reboot cycle and a long delay before getting first video, which throws people off and is a really user-unfriendly way of designing things. PC component makers really should have thought twice about that.

I tried it with 2 sticks and the GPU for 5 minutes. I've removed the GPU and will let it run for 10-15 minutes with one stick to see if that works.

This is exactly why I was terrified of building a PC from scratch.

The 7800X3D does have an iGPU, so as long as you're plugged into the board's video output, you should get video out.

The LED from your imgur looks like a debug LED, but I can't make out what its position is supposed to signify. Check your motherboard's manual.

The light is on the DRAM LED.

mudbunny wrote:

The light is on the DRAM LED.

You've gone down to one stick. I would try doing just the other stick as a test. I'm skeptical about both sticks being bad.

DRAM light can also indicate the CPU is not seated correctly. If swapping RAM sticks doesn't change anything, try re-seating the CPU. Be VERY careful about the pins in the socket and to not bend any out of place. If you do re-seat your CPU, examine the pin array in the socket to see if any of them are out of alignment with the rest.

mudbunny wrote:

This is exactly why I was terrified of building a PC from scratch.

Actually, more so than bench testing, my #1 advice for new PC builders would be: don't be in a hurry. Everything comes with warranties and return windows. Approach it more like a project rather than this-has-to-boot-today-or-it's-a-disaster, because sometimes you'll be sent something that is DOA and need to send it back for a replacement. That's normal, expect it to happen at some point. No need to turn it into a high-anxiety situation. Breathe!

I've bent the living sh*t out of pins on a new CPU (back before the pins moved into the motherboard socket), RMA'd the CPU, and got sent a fresh new one to drop in a few days later. I've been using that CPU now for 7 years (primary PC > secondary PC > home server build) and counting. It's worth it.

Trying the other stick of RAM.

And it booted right away.

Edit - Put the original stick back in slot 4, and it refuses to boot up. So looks like 1 stick of RAM is bad?

Would it be better to re-install the GPU, or install widows with just the onboard graphics? Or does it not make any difference at all?

That seems like the culprit.
You are now a pro

mudbunny wrote:

Trying the other stick of RAM.

And it booted right away.

Edit - Put the original stick back in slot 4, and it refuses to boot up. So looks like 1 stick of RAM is bad?

That would be the conclusion I would draw, yes.

mudbunny wrote:

Would it be better to re-install the GPU, or install widows with just the onboard graphics? Or does it not make any difference at all?

I would put the GPU in so that you can validate that the GPU is good. But it won’t make a difference as far as the Windows install goes, no.

Now to spend some time trying to contact Corsair to get an RMA.

Found another issue.

The clip on the motherboard that holds my GPU in is, apparently, broken, as it is not actually on the motherboard anymore, but on the table that I built it on. The card is still seated, but not fully clipped in.

Time to RMA that as well.

Can it be reattached or is there a break in the plastic? It might just need to be popped back in if there’s no break:

It looks completely broken, both the clip and the part on the motherboard that holds the clip.

Wow. Very unlucky.
Don't let it dissuade you. You are rocking it.

The only thing I am curious about is who did you buy from? Newegg? Amazon?

Did any of the stuff you bought seem like it was open box or repackaged?

I bought from a variety of places. Amazon, NewEgg and Canada Computers. It all looked completely sealed with no apparent signs of re-sealing.

I have a new motherboard ready to pick up tomorrow at a local store about 30 minutes from here, so that won't be a problem, and I will spend some time over Easter re-building it, or seeing if I can just swap out the clip to make my life a whole lot easier.

It's currently installing/transferring Elden Ring (50GB) and Baldurs Gate 3 (120GB) over my home network. Gonna let it bake for a couple of days more before I install it in my desk.

Now to figure out what to do with my old PC.

Those clips if not completely open when installing the boards can get bound up and break. When building mine I pulled the card out to rerun wires and almost did it myself when reinstalling.

Newegg has a track record of selling known broken/returned items as new, so I too would be interested in knowing if the components in question (particularly RAM) were from that source.

peanut3141 wrote:

Newegg has a track record of selling known broken/returned items as new, so I too would be interested in knowing if the components in question (particularly RAM) were from that source.

The RAM was through Amazon, the motherboard from Canada Computers.

Another thing to be cautious of is though you buy on "Amazon" it could be an Amazon seller and not actually amazon itself.
I haven't had any problems with them so far but there are some with not so great feedback.

It was through the Corsair store on Amazon.

Highly recommend the FakeSpot browser extension, which will help point out bogus sellers on Amazon and eBay. Available for Firefox as well as the popular ad company spyware browsers you shouldn't be using.

So I ended up going through Amazon for the return, based on the advice of the Tech Support guy at Corsair.

Clicked the appropriate buttons yesterday for the RAM, it'll be delivered today.

Ram is the wooooooorsttttttt.

I think probably 90% of my problems ever have been RAM, probably more but I don't want to exaggerate.

New RAM obtained, and I replaced the motherboard.

Tested the new sticks one at a time in slot 2, and after a worrying length of time (to me) with the DRAM light on, I got a monitor working with 1 stick each. Plugged in both and, despite knowing both sticks were fine, I still panicked at it taking a while.

But, it's alive!!

I have to admit, it was so much quicker setting it up when I knew already which cables went where, and not having to figure out which of the zillion power cables I needed.

Also a brief moment of panic when I saw the GPU fan wasn't spinning, but with no load other than the monitor, no need for them to spin. They spin when it starts up, so I am not worried.

Now to figure out how to monitor temperatures while I let it sit there.

mudbunny wrote:

Tested the new sticks one at a time in slot 2, and after a worrying length of time (to me) with the DRAM light on, I got a monitor working with 1 stick each. Plugged in both and, despite knowing both sticks were fine, I still panicked at it taking a while.

But, it's alive!!

The worst part of DDR5 is that "is this RAM broken, or is it memory training?" time period whenever installing new RAM or changing a RAM configuration.

Also a brief moment of panic when I saw the GPU fan wasn't spinning, but with no load other than the monitor, no need for them to spin. They spin when it starts up, so I am not worried.

Yeah, that's normal. Not every card will fully spin down to 0 when idle, some will just spin down to a low RPM, but others will fully shut off. Same with certain power supplies.

Now to figure out how to monitor temperatures while I let it sit there.

HWINFO64 monitors everything. Needs to be combined with RTSS for overlay though, and fiddling with both for overlays is not intuitive. Absolute must-have just for being able to open the app and see ALL the sensors though.

The NVIDIA overlay from GeForce Experience (or, better yet, the new beta NVIDIA app) can monitor GPU temps and some other useful stuff like system latency, but not CPU temps.