RIP Terry Goodkind

So Terry Goodkind’s official Facebook page is reporting that he died today.

While I no longer agree with his politics, I quite enjoyed the first few books of the Sword of Truth series. And there’s no doubt that he helped grow the field of modern fantasy.

The Sword of Truth started out great, but dear god it turned into a sh*theap. That might be the single worst high-profile fantasy saga since Tolkien invented the modern form.

I could go on at some length, but since you're supposed to say good stuff about people when they die, I should probably shut up now.

I actually think his ode to Ayn Rand, Faith of the Fallen, is probably his best book.

But, man oh man, did the quality beyond die off somewhere around there. I dropped off somewhere around Chainfire as I lost all interest in who was doing what, where, why or how.

Anyway, rip. I may not have really seen eye-to-eye with him, but I definitely enjoyed the S&M angle of his books.

My thoughts:
Damn, that sucks. He died?

Wait, I thought he was already dead.

Why don’t you like his politics!?

Hold on. Terry Goodkind, not Terry Pratchett... OK... Yeah.

Yep, his work definitely took a turn for me once he went past the S&M dynamic to just straight up rape and general sexual violence. And there's the whole Ayn Rand connection. Really not gonna shed a tear for this one.

CptDomano wrote:

Yep, his work definitely took a turn for me once he went past the S&M dynamic to just straight up rape and general sexual violence. And there's the whole Ayn Rand connection. Really not gonna shed a tear for this one.

That’s fair, and I admit I may be looking back at my younger, more conservative days with rose tinted glasses. And I also stopped at the first trilogy and didn’t watch things go off the rails.

I still feel that a giant of the fantasy genre has passed, and that as a fantasy fan and wannabe writer I owe him some respect for having grown the industry and paved the way for series I love like Game of Thrones or The Witcher.

I have nothing positive to say about the man, but I also don't want to be someone who revels in the deaths of people who I disagree with. Especially if they've committed no crimes or done anything against me. So basically, this is a wasted post. Never mind.

gewy wrote:

My thoughts:
Damn, that sucks. He died?

Wait, I thought he was already dead.

Why don’t you like his politics!?

Hold on. Terry Goodkind, not Terry Pratchett... OK... Yeah.

Glad I'm not the only one that accidentally bought a ticket to this derailed train of thought. I went from upset, to confused, to kind of meh. Which is saying something, because I actually liked the SoT series for the world it created, and the general overarching story. I mean, you kind of have to ignore large portions of the story due to very heavy-handed pushes of his political agenda, but if you can get past that and treat it like a generic fantasy series it's not too bad.

gewy wrote:

My thoughts:
Damn, that sucks. He died?

Wait, I thought he was already dead.

Why don’t you like his politics!?

Hold on. Terry Goodkind, not Terry Pratchett... OK... Yeah.

I thought something similar:

I remembered Pratchett had passed already. But then I started thinking about the Sword of Truth. I don't think I've ever read that one. Was that one of the Shanara books? A quick search confirmed: nope, that was Terry Brooks!

Having met Brooks at a writer’s convention he seems like a mensch. While I haven’t read Shanara, I’ve heard good things about it.

jdzappa wrote:

Having met Brooks at a writer’s convention he seems like a mensch. While I haven’t read Shanara, I’ve heard good things about it.

If by good, you mean "shamelessly derivative, entirely devoid of original ideas, and a case-study in genre tedium", then yes.

I mean, I loved the sh*t out of it when I was 12, but I had the worst taste when I was 12.

I'm not a fan of Brooks, but I can respect all he wrote and his impact. I didn't read Shannara until I was in my 20's and I felt that the way he almost wholesale remade LOTR's world felt cheap.

garion333 wrote:

I actually think his ode to Ayn Rand, Faith of the Fallen, is probably his best book.

But, man oh man, did the quality beyond die off somewhere around there. I dropped off somewhere around Chainfire as I lost all interest in who was doing what, where, why or how.

Chainfire was a convoluted mess. Confessor (the last book in that series) basically looked at Chainfire and said "Hold my beer."

I mean, RIP Goodkind, but the older I get the more I'd rather read (or in terms of audiobooks, listen to) just about anything else.