Neil Peart RIP

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...

Brain cancer. 67 years old.

Sad, sad day.

I have no words.

Just found out. He brought me much joy and entertainment over the years. I'm fairly bummed right now. RIP.

Rush and Yes were the first two bands I really got into as a pre-teen back in the late 70's.

Been a devout fan since. Just man, I'm so heartbroken.

Saw them on the R30 tour. Man, they were great.

RIP Neil.

I just had to move my car and The Spirit of Radio was on. It made me happy during a very blah day. Not that I know why they were playing it I'm not happy anymore.

Wow, that sucks.

This one hurts. Rush was and still is very important to me. I saw all of the tours from 1980-2007. Rush was the first concert I took my oldest son to. Rush is one of the bands that both me and my kids can like together - there are damn few of them.

Neil was an amazing drummer live. I have so many great memories seeing him in concert. Most drum solos are self-indulgent trash to me - his were wonderful to behold. He seemed to be a nice person away from the spotlight, someone I wish I could have had a beer and talked about random stuff with for an hour or so.

RIP Neil. You will be missed.

The greatest drummer of all time as far as I'm concerned, and a hell of a lyricist to boot. The world's lost a great one.

My phone told me about this today shortly before leaving work. I had just finishing listening to Rush in Rio shortly before that, too. I ended up sticking around another hour or so, talking with a couple of other Rush fans. Too bummed to drive.

tboon wrote:

This one hurts. Rush was and still is very important to me. I saw all of the tours from 1980-2007. Rush was the first concert I took my oldest son to. Rush is one of the bands that both me and my kids can like together - there are damn few of them.

Neil was an amazing drummer live. I have so many great memories seeing him in concert. Most drum solos are self-indulgent trash to me - his were wonderful to behold. He seemed to be a nice person away from the spotlight, someone I wish I could have had a beer and talked about random stuff with for an hour or so.

RIP Neil. You will be missed.

All of my kids like Rush. My youngest looooooooooooves Rush, and was a little upset when I told her about this.

I actually got to meet Neil once (as a hanger-on in a group of people he knew), during the Power Windows tour. Neil was amazingly polite and kind in person. I didn't realize at the time how unusual that opportunity was, as I had really only just started to listen to Rush. They've been my favorite group ever since then.

According to Media Monkey, I have just shy of 40 hours of Rush music in my library. I think I'll start with Vapor Trails.

I got into Rush my junior year of college, so 1989-1990. I spent the next 20 years largely obsessed by them; my first online home was the alt.music.rush newsgroup, and I got to know the people there so well a bunch of us flew out to Nashville for the opening night of the R30 tour to meet for the first time. I wore a 2112 pin hidden under my lapel at my wedding, started playing guitar because I wanted to play the bridge of Red Barchetta", and have listened to more Rush than any other band in my life. I finally dropped off from the band probably a dozen or so years ago, their last few albums didn't do it for me at all, and, with the explosion of music being online, I started diversifying into indie rock and punk and electronica and all these other things, and I finally stopped spinning Rush constantly. They are still, even with all of the diverse stuff I've gotten into and listen to, pretty clearly the defining band of my life, and getting into Rush was when I stopped just hearing music and started actually listening to it, and, while all my fellow suburbanites seem to be wallowing in a constant mix of classic rock, adult alternative, and pleasingly hunky mom-rock singer-songwriters, I'm still that almost 50-year-old who's always searching for something new and interesting to listen to, and I absolutely know that the first time it ever occurred to me that I started doing that was when I realized I was listening to this band with all these great songs and hidden behind it all was weird time signatures and intricate drumming and cool synth sounds, and, even though I have never liked prog rock even vaguely, there was something about Rush's dedication just making a great riff like in "Limelight" or "The Spirit of Radio" and building a song around it, and then figuring out how to do weird sh*t in the background for fun. There was an entertaining, pop hook aspect behind all the technical wizardry that made them stand out from all the math-rock wankers out there.

For whatever reason, "Subdivisions" got in my head last week, so I listened to Signals, Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows, and Hold Your Fire, and it was probably the first time I'd really listened to Rush in a couple years. Found myself genuinely enjoying it again, to my surprise. It's one of those things where no matter what I get into, Rush is pretty much a fundamental part of my musical DNA.

So I guess it's time to start with the second album (SUCK IT, RUTSEY), and binge-listen for a few days.

From The New Yorker (really!):
The Misfit Awesomeness of Neil Peart and Rush

Amanda Petrusich in The New Yorker wrote:

If you can’t have a good time blasting “Tom Sawyer,” then some awesome part of you has withered.

I love that the image of Neil with the article shows him wearing a badge from The Prisoner.

Rush was the first concert I ever went to. It was the Roll the Bones tour in 1992. A great show. Neil will be missed.

One of the greatest bands of all time. 2112 was the unofficial anthem of our computer engineering department in college. A great talent gone.

2112 changed my understanding of what music could be. I'd heard great short-form music before of course but 2112 is an epic tale.

I had it in my head that Peart once (or often) performed into a version of his wrap-around setup that was lifted off the stage and even turned upside down. I can't find any video evidence of this. Do I have the wrong person in my head?

Peart had a wrap-around set that would rotate mid-show for him to play solos and the like.

But for lifting off the stage I think you're talking about Motley Crue's Tommy Lee who had a kit that would lift to a 45 degree or so angle and then a later tour where the kit was completely welded to a cage that would rise up and spin around like an amusement park ride.

Tommy Lee and Neil Peart. Same planet, different worlds.

All of Neil Peart's audio books are free at Amazon for a limited time
https://www.amazon.ca/s?i=stripbooks...