Help me build my PC 2020 Catch All

Malor wrote:

I looked up some reviews, and those really aren't bad. At low-ish heat output(95 to 125W), they're only a couple degrees worse than good quality thermal paste. At high output (270W), they're more like +5 to +7 degrees (ie, possibly enough to cause thermal throttling), but you're probably nowhere near there.

edit: note that bad-quality CPU coolers can crimp or dent the pad, meaning you shouldn't re-use it.

The i7-6800K tops out at about 100W unless highly over-clocked (which I'm not), so I should be OK. The AIO is a Corsair H100i with recently replaced fans, so the pad should still be OK. Good point on the AS5, but I always have should I need.

Feeank wrote:
Moggy wrote:

I also vacuumed some dust and reversed one of the fans to pull air into the case rather than extract it.

That's great, I think the emboldened section shares the most responsability on your new improved temps, how many fans did you have extracting before? I was considering a thermal pad instead of regular paste for my new rig last year but found too much colliding info regarding it's effectiveness. Same could be said about any paste probably but I'd decided to keep up with the tried and true method.

Maybe, but it really wasn't that dusty. I only reversed one 120mm fan. Other than that I have 2 120mm extracting for the AIO and 2 240mm inserting on the front.

I have noted that my RTX2080ti throws the hot air back into the case rather than out the back, so that probably doesn't help air temperatures. I wish my case had a fan on the side that could extract this hot air. Ah well. When I upgrade I'll be getting a case that has ample options for cooling fans - the bigger the better. Big fans mean slower RPMs which means lower noise.

Moggy wrote:

The i7-6800K tops out at about 100W unless highly over-clocked (which I'm not), so I should be OK. The AIO is a Corsair H100i with recently replaced fans, so the pad should still be OK. Good point on the AS5, but I always have should I need.

Gamers Nexus doesn't seem to think much of Corsair's build quality for heatsinks, so in that specific case the AS5 might be a little better. But most of the time, they're about the same. And as long as it's working, don't screw with it, you're fine.

It's annoying to have to do anything with this rig. By now I should be sporting a brand new shiny. Damn supply chain shenanigans.

While a piece of me is expecting to be disappointed, I am looking forward to a new console and a new rig this November.

Intel is looking to change how they express chip manufacturing processes, presumably because they're tired of how bad it looks shipping 14nm process CPUs again while the competition ships a second generation of 7nm chips and preps their move to 5nm.

There is some truth in the fact that the measurements between the two chip makers isn't a true apples to apples comparison, but the discrepancies never bothered Intel until their manufacturing process hit a multi-year wall.

Intel's process is actually worse than they're advertising, not better. The numbers they bat around for maximum density are achievable, but not in a performance configuration. The chips they ship themselves use libraries that design big, fat transistors, much lower density (and higher power) than the putative "14nm" or "10nm" classes would indicate.

They can try to lie to us, but they can't lie to physics. No matter how much Marketing hates it, their chips aren't quite competitive anymore, and run ridiculously hot to do even that well.

And rumors are claiming that Zen 4 is going to be another 40% uplift.... apparently the same sources saying 20% for Zen 3. (which turned out to be, on average, about 19%.)

Stele wrote:

3600 is in stock right now at Amazon. For delivery in May.

But still. At least you'll actually get it, if you want it. And often they get these things earlier, just worst case scenario on date.

Surprise. It shipped and it's going to be here Friday.

Thought I was going to have 4 more weeks to research parts and maybe cancel if needed. But I guess this is happening. Now I gotta choose a motherboard. And a case. Cases seem insane now with all the glass sides. Really no idea what I want.

Just something with USB 3 ports on the front and good ventilation is all I really need. Any thoughts?

I don't have one myself, but the Phanteks P500A gets mentioned a lot here. Dunno if it does USB3 thought.

I can definitely say to avoid the Cooler Master SL600M. It's a terrible case. I bought it primarily because it had a sloped front panel with good USB3 connectivity. Even that part doesn't seem to work right; the USB-C port on the front is unreliable. It also doesn't have a reset button. It also doesn't have a hard power-off switch of any kind.

In every respect, that case has come in far below my expectations. It was expensive, and not worth a quarter what they're charging. Don't buy one.

It's so bad, in fact, that I plan to never touch Cooler Master anything, ever again.

Malor wrote:

I don't have one myself, but the Phanteks P500A gets mentioned a lot here. Dunno if it does USB3 thought.

Looks like it has 2 USB 3, 1 USB-C and headphone jack right on the top front corner. Interesting layout. It's on the "possibles" list, which I guess I have a day or two to figure out haha.

Stele wrote:
Stele wrote:

3600 is in stock right now at Amazon. For delivery in May.

But still. At least you'll actually get it, if you want it. And often they get these things earlier, just worst case scenario on date.

Surprise. It shipped and it's going to be here Friday.

Thought I was going to have 4 more weeks to research parts and maybe cancel if needed. But I guess this is happening. Now I gotta choose a motherboard. And a case. Cases seem insane now with all the glass sides. Really no idea what I want.

Just something with USB 3 ports on the front and good ventilation is all I really need. Any thoughts?

You would probably be good with anything Hardware Nexus recommends. They do a lot of testing on cases, especially when it relates to good airflow.

Malor wrote:

I don't have one myself, but the Phanteks P500A gets mentioned a lot here. Dunno if it does USB3 though.

I just got one and am doing my 5900/3080 build in one. My previous build was in a Phanteks Enthoo Pro, and the P500 is well worth the ~$40 price difference.

There's plenty of space, lots of included velcro ties for cable management, and the main door is on hinges and magnetic (no screws!). The feet on the bottom are tall enough that even on carpet there's ample room for ventilation underneath.

It does have USB 3 on the front (on top): there are two type A and one type C (a separate header for type C is required, so check to make sure your mobo will support that). Mine doesn't, so if I decide I need that I'll have to get a PCIE card.

I've heard good things about the P600 as well.

Gaald wrote:
Stele wrote:
Stele wrote:

3600 is in stock right now at Amazon. For delivery in May.

But still. At least you'll actually get it, if you want it. And often they get these things earlier, just worst case scenario on date.

Surprise. It shipped and it's going to be here Friday.

Thought I was going to have 4 more weeks to research parts and maybe cancel if needed. But I guess this is happening. Now I gotta choose a motherboard. And a case. Cases seem insane now with all the glass sides. Really no idea what I want.

Just something with USB 3 ports on the front and good ventilation is all I really need. Any thoughts?

You would probably be good with anything Hardware Nexus recommends. They do a lot of testing on cases, especially when it relates to good airflow.

Yeah their best of 2020 article has the phanteks mentioned, as well as a couple others. Lian li seems to have some cool ones but out of stock on Amazon.

That site definitely helps weigh price, cooling, and some other stuff.

Phishposer wrote:

It does have USB 3 on the front (on top): there are two type A and one type C (a separate header for type C is required, so check to make sure your mobo will support that). Mine doesn't, so if I decide I need that I'll have to get a PCIE card.

Good point. Since I haven't picked a mobo yet that is something to check.

The P500A is the tits.

Looking at upgrading my case fans to Noctuas. Does it matter if I get a 3-pin or 4-pin if the header is 3-pin? Both variants are the same price so I'm thinking I might as well just get the 4-pin in case I ever change to a mobo with more 4-pin headers

There's no reason to get the 3-pin ones. PWM fans (4-pin) will run just like non-PWM fans if they're only provided the 3 pin connection.

Yeah, always buy 4-pin fans. They don't cost any more, so I'm not sure why 3-pinners are still on the market.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/Kgr2K0J.png)

Should be-
"Did you manage to get your Radeon 6000 series or Nvidia 3000 series?"

There is nothing specific to the 3090 that can't be applied to the 6800xt or the 3060ti, etc.

If my gaming time on my pc mostly consists of text based sims and MMOs then would it make sense to have my eye on something more powerful than a 3600/X?

I'm also toying with the idea of using it as a Plex server for music, though I already use my current for movie/TV streaming via Plex. Far from its primary function though.

A 3700X isn't so far off the $$ mark, and is generally available, I'm not against it, but would I get any benefit from those extra cores or am I spending money on something that'll sit idle?

I didn't look at the 3700x specifically. But 3600 vs 3600x vs 5600x, it just made sense to me to get the 3600. $200 vs $250 vs $300. But benchmarks were only 10% better and 20-30% better, respectively for 25% and 50% more money. Just doesn't make sense to me to spend more.

Honestly I'd have a hard time ignoring the i5-11400 right now. As loathe I am to buy into an Intel platform, given the elevated prices of even last-gen Ryzens, the performance-per-dollar is pretty well in the 11400's favor, for gaming at least.

garion333 wrote:

If my gaming time on my pc mostly consists of text based sims and MMOs then would it make sense to have my eye on something more powerful than a 3600/X?

I'm also toying with the idea of using it as a Plex server for music, though I already use my current for movie/TV streaming via Plex. Far from its primary function though.

A 3700X isn't so far off the $$ mark, and is generally available, I'm not against it, but would I get any benefit from those extra cores or am I spending money on something that'll sit idle?

A lot depends on your budget and how long you plan to keep the machine. If you're gonna run with no more CPU upgrades for 5+ years, then it might make sense to go up to a 5600X. Amortized over time, it's not that much money, and the performance delta is enough that it might let you stave off upgrading for an extra year or two.

But if you're thinking about right now, and not so much five years from now, then a 3600 (non-X) or 11400 might well make sense. And the Intel parts are super easy to find.

You could also look at the 11600K, which is roughly comparable to a 5600X for somewhat less money. It's not as good, but it's almost there, noticeably cheaper, and easy to get. Its main downside is that the chip runs really hot, so you need good cooling. It will cost you more on your power bills when you're running the chip hard, but it idles at lower wattage than any of the AMD chips. If you leave the machine on all the time, the idle savings will probably more than offset the burst-use cost.

I'm not against Intel but the boards seem more expensive and it keeps pouring me off. I'd rather not give them anymore funds for being lazy the past decade.

That said the price point of the CPU does seem better than amd right now.

I'm running an overclocked 2500k still so anything is gonna be a huge upgrade.

Wow, that'll be ... noticeable, no matter what you buy. I upgraded from a 4790K, and this 5800X is way faster. It's probably close to a 50% per core boost, and has twice as many cores. From a 2500K, it would probably be more like a 70% boost per core. The difference would be very, very noticeable in anything heavily CPU-bound. If, for instance, you like emulation, a 5600X would be a massive improvement.

Of the applications you explicitly mention, Plex is probably the only thing that really uses CPU. If you're using it to transcode, I think it supports Intel better than AMD.... the Intel GPUs have compression acceleration that's apparently pretty good. Thin_J knows more about that, he might chime in. If you're not transcoding, if you're just playing the videos in the original format, then pretty much anything is fine.

The rest of your apps should be perfectly happy on a 3600. It'll still be a big upgrade, and should be comfortable for awhile. If you're not interested in ports of console games, I'd imagine it would last three years easy, maybe longer.

Another argument against sinking a ton of money into AMD: socket AM4 is at its end of life, and rumors are claiming that the CPUs next year will increase in speed by another forty percent. If you buy a cheapie now, you won't feel bad if you want to jump up to socket AM5, DDR5, and Zen 4 in a couple years. And even a current cheapie will be a massive improvement.

If you're going for cheap but decent, that 11400 is very appealing. $180ish for the chip, $180ish for the board, $100ish for 16 gigs of RAM, and you'd have a nice core upgrade for ~$500 after tax. And there are boards from ASRock that are closer to $100, so you could probably get that down close to $400.

You're making me question my desire to upgrade from a 4790k 4690k to a 5900x right now, if AM5 is just around the corner...

Edit: 4690k, not 4790k

merphle wrote:

You're making me question my desire to upgrade from a 4790k to a 5900x right now, if AM5 is just around the corner...

Isn't something always around the corner?

Heretk wrote:
merphle wrote:

You're making me question my desire to upgrade from a 4790k to a 5900x right now, if AM5 is just around the corner...

Isn't something always around the corner?

Yes, but AM4 is at the end of its life. Upgrading to an AM4 motherboard at this point would mandate another motherboard upgrade for any future improvements, whereas waiting for AM5 would potentially give a longer upgrade path.

Who am I kidding? If I find a 5900x in stock, I'll snap it up in a heartbeat.

FWIW, I've got no regrets if AM5 ends up being much better than AM4. I really wanted a new machine; the last one was 7 years old, with a 6-year-old GPU. I got my money's worth out of the old one, and I expect I'll do the same here. And having run Intel for 15+ years, I'm used to having to buy motherboard/CPU/RAM all at once.

If AMD keeps going like gangbusters, I might feel the need to upgrade sooner than six years, but I'd chalk that up in the win column too, because that would mean computers were getting a lot faster.

Also AM4 is mature while AM5 will likely be finicky on launch

Yeah I don't know that I would want to jump onto an AM5 chip in the first generation. I would at least wait several months to see if somehow AM5 had no finicky issues that caused headaches for people.

The existence of a next generation Ryzen and Mobo socket won’t make your existing Ryzen 5xxx and AM4 slower than it is today. You will still get 5-7 years out of it.