Star Trek: Picard Catch-All [Spoilers]

So I am enjoying this show, but the writing comes across as really lazy and, well, quite frankly sh*t. From the technobabble CSI scene in the apartment (where we learn that *gasp* someone is living off-world ... in a space-faring civilization. Shocking!) to the one-dimensional mustache twirling villains. If you make a drinking game for every time someone says a variation of "if you fail me again it will be the last time!" you'll be dead before the episode ends.

I don't know, maybe it will get better, but Patrick Stewart is the only reason I'm enjoying this show so far.

So.. at what point is this going to start feeling like a Star Trek show? We have F-bombs now too. If it wasn't for Patrick Stewart, I'd think it's some random new generic scifi show.

Djinn wrote:

So I am enjoying this show, but the writing comes across as really lazy and, well, quite frankly sh*t. From the technobabble CSI scene in the apartment (where we learn that *gasp* someone is living off-world ... in a space-faring civilization. Shocking!).

I’ve always gotten the impression from Trek that casual warp travel isn’t super common among humans in the Federation. There are a few instances of tourism that I remember offhand, but otherwise long-distance space travel seems limited to Starfleet or “private” initiatives like colonization or cargo shipping. There’s more of it in DS9, but even then most of the people with their own warp-capable craft are either wealthy aliens or some commercial interest.

I’m by no means an expert, though, this is just a casual observation.

I’m wondering if I should bail after the first episode. I got into Star Trek for the first time with Discovery but this feels like it isn’t for me.

For people that don't have the service and don't pirate their shows the first episode is on Pluto TV for free.

All of the reviews out there right now are based on the first 3 episodes, because that's all CBS released to them. They all say these three episodes are mostly expository.

Does that mean things will change in episode 4? I don't know, but I doubt it. Kurtzman seems to have indicated this show is meant to be more of a drama.

As far as the technobabble CSI: Tal Shiar scene... I didn't find it that terribly egregious. Certainly not in comparison to other uses of technobabble. See: a significant majority of Voyager episodes where they brought the problem-of-the-week into existence with technobabble, then solved it with another kind of technobabble.

Picard just used it to establish that there wasn't much evidence left for them to work with, and that Soji is definitely offworld. I can live with that.

I have my problems with this show already (Data's neurons are some kind of fractal that can store his entire consciousness? Whut? Androids are now biological? Are we BSGing this place up? ANOTHER f*cking secret society under the existing secret society?) but I'm probably here for the duration, so I'm being as forgiving of it as I can manage.

Spoiler:

Also, the whole "biological android" thing, and the Zhat Vash having a "secret that will break your mind" ... I sincerely hope these writers aren't setting up that either the Vulcans or the Romulans are somehow an ancient android species that became biological, and their own society. Don't f*ck with the canon that much, please.

Baron Of Hell wrote:

For people that don't have the service and don't pirate their shows the first episode is on Pluto TV for free.

It's also up on YouTube for a limited time:

Well I really enjoyed that first episode. It has me hooked....but not hooked enough to subscribe. However I will be getting it when it is out on DVD.

NSMike wrote:

I have my problems with this show already (Data's neurons are some kind of fractal that can store his entire consciousness? Whut? Androids are now biological? Are we BSGing this place up? ANOTHER f*cking secret society under the existing secret society?) but I'm probably here for the duration, so I'm being as forgiving of it as I can manage.

The last season of TNG did introduce a "biological android" through Data's mother Juliana Tainer. She still had a positronic net but had devices that would fool sensors and transporters into believing she was 100% biological. She also aged and would eventually die. So it isn't a stretch to say that with nanotech, one could make an android that is more biological then technological.

I mean, I don't have a problem with the plausibility of the concept... I just kinda hate that this show is going BSG on us already.

I enjoyed it. I still feel like people have some rose colored glasses as far as TNG goes. Star Trek IS technobabble so the little bit here is not really that much. People complained about too much action last week and not enough this week.

IMO, they told who was Data related in the 1st ep so it has already passed the BSG test.

Just wait until the finale. You know they are going to reveal that Picard was replaced with an android ;).

Can't tell if you're joking, but there's some definite visual foreshadowing to that effect in the intro.

hbi2k wrote:

Can't tell if you're joking, but there's some definite visual foreshadowing to that effect in the intro.

About half joking. After I wrote it I kind of think that is how it might go.

This is on Amazon Prime in the UK and the episodes are being released weekly, so I've only seen episodes 1 and 2. So far it's quite mediocre, a nonsensical story and one short 45 minute episode every week isn't helping it. Also, while I was initially looking forward to seeing Patrick Stewart reprising the role of Picard, I'm finding hard to imagine Picard being so diminished by age and retreating into retirement.

The tern technobabble ORIGINATES with star trek. that's the term they used in the draft scripts when they needed people to make up trek sounded science magic talk.

I enjoyed the second episode. I didn't think the technobabble was nearly as egregious as it got in Voyager. The biggest suspension of disbelief issue I had was with the "Romulan molecular forensic reconstruction" methods. And to be fair, the investigation of Dahj's PDA wasn't technically wrong, just ridiculously overgeneralized. But that's done to gloss over the differences with computers in the future and that the reality would be boring as crap. I'm betting if they're watching "CSI: Lunar One" in the Star Trek universe in the 24th century, people are complaining that the computer hacking scenes are unrealistic.

Anyways, more speculation:

Spoiler:

I'm revising my earlier theory. Maddox isn't with the Romulans. Not all the synths went bad, but the rest saw the writing on the wall and fled, and Maddox went with them. I also think the Zhat Vash might predate the Vulcan/Romulan split. To once again borrow from a different sci-fi franchise, the Vulcan's shift towards pure logic may have also served as a Mentat-like substitute for a lack of more advanced computing power.

I'm probably way off the mark, but making wild guesses is too much fun right now.

deftly wrote:

I enjoyed the second episode. I didn't think the technobabble was nearly as egregious as it got in Voyager. The biggest suspension of disbelief issue I had was with the "Romulan molecular forensic reconstruction" methods. And to be fair, the investigation of Dahj's PDA wasn't technically wrong, just ridiculously overgeneralized. But that's done to gloss over the differences with computers in the future and that the reality would be boring as crap. I'm betting if they're watching "CSI: Lunar One" in the Star Trek universe in the 24th century, people are complaining that the computer hacking scenes are unrealistic.

Anyways, more speculation:

Spoiler:

I'm revising my earlier theory. Maddox isn't with the Romulans. Not all the synths went bad, but the rest saw the writing on the wall and fled, and Maddox went with them. I also think the Zhat Vash might predate the Vulcan/Romulan split. To once again borrow from a different sci-fi franchise, the Vulcan's shift towards pure logic may have also served as a Mentat-like substitute for a lack of more advanced computing power.

I'm probably way off the mark, but making wild guesses is too much fun right now.

Spoiler:

I think it's also clear from the second episodes cold open that the synths didn't actually 'go bad'. The eye flickers definitely say to me that the synth in the open is being controlled from elsewhere and not acting on it's own free will, emphasized by the synth's last action being to destroy it's positron brain to prevent that fact being uncovered

thrawn82 wrote:
deftly wrote:

I enjoyed the second episode. I didn't think the technobabble was nearly as egregious as it got in Voyager. The biggest suspension of disbelief issue I had was with the "Romulan molecular forensic reconstruction" methods. And to be fair, the investigation of Dahj's PDA wasn't technically wrong, just ridiculously overgeneralized. But that's done to gloss over the differences with computers in the future and that the reality would be boring as crap. I'm betting if they're watching "CSI: Lunar One" in the Star Trek universe in the 24th century, people are complaining that the computer hacking scenes are unrealistic.

Anyways, more speculation:

Spoiler:

I'm revising my earlier theory. Maddox isn't with the Romulans. Not all the synths went bad, but the rest saw the writing on the wall and fled, and Maddox went with them. I also think the Zhat Vash might predate the Vulcan/Romulan split. To once again borrow from a different sci-fi franchise, the Vulcan's shift towards pure logic may have also served as a Mentat-like substitute for a lack of more advanced computing power.

I'm probably way off the mark, but making wild guesses is too much fun right now.

Spoiler:

I think it's also clear from the second episodes cold open that the synths didn't actually 'go bad'. The eye flickers definitely say to me that the synth in the open is being controlled from elsewhere and not acting on it's own free will, emphasized by the synth's last action being to destroy it's positron brain to prevent that fact being uncovered

Spoiler:

Sure, that's probably a bad choice of words on my part. Regardless, I suspect that not all of the synths were under remote control during the Mars attack. It seems like it would be the work of the Zaht Vash. Maybe the destruction of Romulus forced them to rush their plans. The chaos and internal strife, not to mention the loss of the largest shipyard facility, prevents the Federation from becoming the sole superpower in the Alpha quadrant.

So that sign in the cube that said "5000+ days since last assimilation" had to be put up by a human right? No way Romulans have that level sense of humor? lol

Assuming that count is accurate and that they're going by 24-hour Earth days, that comes to 16 years. Which would also mean that the facility was active for years before the Romulan supernova and Utopia Planitia attack. Food for thought.

karmajay wrote:

So that sign in the cube that said "5000+ days since last assimilation" had to be put up by a human right? No way Romulans have that level sense of humor? lol

There's a sign in Romulan right next to it.

I felt episode three alleviated my concerns about episode two (and as it turns out they were originally supposed to be one episode). Like what they did with the new characters, Raffi and Rios (and Rios and Rios). I just hope whatever was implied between Narik and Narissa was a one off and that they're not Romulannisters. Also, even though it's still early, but I can see people who aren't knowledgeable of "I, Borg" and the "Descent" two-parter not realizing who Hugh is.

Yeah, that was a big improvement. Some of the writing is still a bit clunky, but it was still a notable improvement over last week's episode.

If you don't want the ending of episode 4 spoiled, do not watch the opening credits.

Really enjoying this show - except for the cliffhanger endings.

I really like how this show goes deep on how diverse the Romulan culture is. And of course Picard just being Picard.

Spoiler:

I loved how he dressed down Elnor for killing Senator No-Head.

Rat Boy wrote:

If you don't want the ending of episode 4 spoiled, do not watch the opening credits.

I skipped it, and now that you mention this, I am glad I did. Sucks they would do that, but I guess they have to.

Rat Boy wrote:

If you don't want the ending of episode 4 spoiled, do not watch the opening credits.

Spoiler:

I figured she was going to show up soon in the series anyways. But when you're down to 90 seconds left in the episode, it does pretty much give away who's on the other ship. I was more annoyed that her name was in the credits for almost as long as she was in the actual episode. Ah well, there's always next week!

The best thing about all the new Star Treks is that they lowered my standards. The other day I started watching Voyager, which I couldn't stand before - I only managed to watch 2 episodes years ago but now I'm actually enjoying it.

I'm somewhat bewildered at all the negativity. For me it hits all the right nostalgia notes, but improves on 'old' star trek in many ways. I'm not crazy about some of the decisions they've made, but for the most part I'm enjoying the hell out of it.