The Next Dragon Age Game

I'm disappointed there wasn't an option in Inquisition in regards to discussing the Hero of Fereldan:

Spoiler:

...to remark, "Wait, he romanced Leiliana, had a kid with Morrigan, and married the queen?"

LastSurprise wrote:

Question for the Dragon Age crowd: I've been thinking of going back and playing through actually finishing Origins. I played most of Origins with the human noble origin, and I think that MC as a Cousland has become canonical to me. I really like how the murder of the MC's family, at the hands of Howe and his goons, fundamentally alters the relationship that you, the player, have to Loghain and Howe. I also played the mage's origin, and thought it was ok but it didn't grip me.

But, I haven't tried any of the other origins. Do you all feel like there are any others that fundamentally affect how your character relates to the world, or your understanding of particular characters? Feel free to spoil the origins, I don't care at this point.

Thinking about this because I got a copy of Inquisition earlier this year, and haven't played it yet; I was contemplating going back through DA:O and DA2 before jumping into Inquisition. That may be biting off more than I can chew, and I might just prepare my tapestry and call it a day.

All the origins feel pretty significant and distinct to me. The human noble story allows you to make political decisions unavailable to the others at the end of the game. The two Dwarven ones are pretty excellent for the Orzammar section of the game. The city elf gives you a very dark, interesting perspective on events as well. Both the mage and Dalish elven origins give context on a lot of the wider lore of the world (the latter also ties into Dragon Age 2, I believe).

I recall the Cousland story feeling somewhat disappointing in the end as a human noble, for what that's worth.

The city elf origin is my favourite because as much as I love BioWare they tend to push the "almighty hero" angle pretty hard in their games. Being a character that is an almighty hero but also of a species a lot of people look down on created some dialogue scenes that were closer in style to Witcher games.

Eleima wrote:
Spoiler:

Cullen is basically Kaidan reincarnated with lyrium addiction in stead of L2 migraines. ;)

IMAGE(https://media.giphy.com/media/NCjISbEPFxm48/giphy.gif)

LastSurprise wrote:

Question for the Dragon Age crowd:

I agree with beanman that they're all pretty solid in their own ways. I didn't play the entire game as all of them, but as someone who invests pretty heavily into playing a role, I did feel distinctly different in approaching various events. I didn't finish my city elf woman play, but due to her origin she really relished how her new position let her bludgeon over these damn humans.

Also, the city elf marketing image can be troubling but also ... rules. "I have lost everything, but you still possess your other eye!" Hell Yeah.

LastSurprise wrote:

Do you all feel like there are any others that fundamentally affect how your character relates to the world, or your understanding of particular characters? Feel free to spoil the origins, I don't care at this point.

I really liked the power and politics of the Dwarven Noble origin. It also made me pause and consider what I felt was best for Orzammar versus what my player would feel personally when going back to the the quests there.

I have a soft spot for the Mage Origin, because it explains a whole lot of magical and historical lore. I’d recommend at least through the prologue of each origin (and female city elf felt more powerful to me than male city elf).

The human noble was my favourite playthrough of DA:O - although I only completed that origin and the mage origin for the whole game. I did play all the Origin stories though (up to the point you join the grey wardens) and the dwarves would probably be the next I would play, if I ever went through it all again, either from the slums or as the exiled noble. The city elf had an interesting start (putting it mildly) but the dalish start was pretty uninspired.

Need to play DAO again!
Played mage, human noble and dwarf noble before. Liked them all. It really does make some meaningful difference when playing.

Eleima wrote:

I’d recommend at least through the prologue of each origin (and female city elf felt more powerful to me than male city elf).

Incidentally, this is required for a cheev.

Whoa, and now I want to replay all the games.

garion333 wrote:

Whoa, and now I want to replay all the games.

Origins is nominated in RPG club right now for the next game to play. (Starting in January.) Might be worth a vote!

^OH! Depending on the reshade\ENB options available, that is sorely tempting! The city elf origin is the farthest I ever progressed with a character. Perhaps it's time to bolt this to the HDD and try something different -- it's been years (plus I need a distraction.. about to have a third child of a 'dependent' under my roof. argh)

"ubrakto” wrote:

Origins is nominated in RPG club right now for the next game to play. (Starting in January.) Might be worth a vote! :)

Shameless hustling in other threads is it?

I heard that Darkest Dungeon reveals who Solas truly is.

Spoiler:

sorry!

Sorbicol wrote:
"ubrakto” wrote:

Origins is nominated in RPG club right now for the next game to play. (Starting in January.) Might be worth a vote! :)

Shameless hustling in other threads is it?

What is this thing you call "shame"? I'm unfamiliar.

Fired DA:I back up with the news of the next game. Picked up on my Nightmare play through I last played 3 years ago. Once I got the hang of things again it has gone pretty smoothly. First play through was a human mage and this time it is an elf dagger rogue. The vastness of the lore and tying all 3 current games together is pretty neat. Game 4 will be interesting to see how the story moves forward.

The Past and Present of Dragon Age 4

Playing as spies in Tevinter planning heists sounds like it could have been fun. And it sounds like it would have been a tighter focus than Inquisition; on the other hand, not hand-crafting quests leads me to recall how much I don't like Bethesda's Radiant quest system in Fallout 4. Not exactly sure what to take away from this, as it seems everything is still so early in the process right now with the reset that happened to bail out Anthem.

Aeazel wrote:

The Past and Present of Dragon Age 4

Playing as spies in Tevinter planning heists sounds like it could have been fun. And it sounds like it would have been a tighter focus than Inquisition; on the other hand, not hand-crafting quests leads me to recall how much I don't like Bethesda's Radiant quest system in Fallout 4. Not exactly sure what to take away from this, as it seems everything is still so early in the process right now with the reset that happened to bail out Anthem.

The back end of that article makes it sounds - somewhat worryingly - that DA4 will be Anthem with Dragons with some weird ass lootbox system.

Still, wait and see. They are clearly doing something after releasing that teaser trailer last year, but it’ll be interesting to see exactly what.

Maybe I’m wrong, but it kind of feels like DA4 may be BioWare’s last shot at restoring some of their prestigious reputation from the old days.

I do fear we’re looking at another game where the online, loot-based, “games a a service” mandate is at odds with Bioware’s traditional story- and character-focused approach. Has one of these type of games ever had a great story with meaningful choices? I can’t think of an example.

Wish EA would just take a step back and let Bioware make Bioware games. Like why did they buy them if not to have someone making kick ass single player RPGs? Hell Mass Effect Andromeda gave EA one of the best first quarters it ever had and it wasn't some game-as-a-service cash grab.

It feels gross and disappointing reading that article, but not the least bit surprising. Seems to me like the foundational culture at Bioware took the biggest crack under EA's hammer when the founders left a few years ago. Everything since feels like the inevitable erosion that occurs at every developer EA gobbles up. Eventually, there's just not that much left of what made a place special, which... /shrug/. It's unfortunate, but I got a lot of great memories from what they've already done that no dictated focus on multiplayer or games-as-service can take away; and if they can sell more by appealing to people who aren't me, then more power to them.

I'll still be looking to see what they deliver for DA4 and hoping for the best, but for my money and time, it's got an uphill climb.

I mean, horrible loot-box/games as services culture aside, the first Kotaku article made it sound like EA was pretty hands off with Anthem and Andromeda(?), with the bigger problem being Bioware management more than anything. That plus they've already long since chased away (or drained to the point of nervous breakdown) all of their best talent. It was only AFTER EA decided to get involved that they started to actually pull Anthem into something resembling a finished product.

* Unless there's a serious shift in the way they work on projects, I forsee this as just being a repeat of what happened last two times. And tbh, i don't know that i could support what they produce even if it turns out great, because they are literally working people until they are physically ill and forced to take leave / quit and that's seriously got to change.

Edit for TLDR: I fear even the best management there is would have a hard time creating a product that satisfies the opposing needs of EA and BioWare fans. Therefore we are likely to have a repeat of Anthem’s mismanagement.

I remember a long time ago when I was a student, I had a Summer job working in a lab. The scientist in charge was very hands off and busy doing other things. She basically just told me what experiments she wanted to do for this research article and left me to my own devices to carry them out. I thought I could probably do it. Trouble is, despite some experience, I soon found out I was in over my head. All the other coworkers were busy doing their thing and didn't want to help. I remember wasting several weeks just reading numerous journal articles and trying to act busy without actually starting on the real work itself. I'd go out for long lunches and wander around the building and often just take naps at my desk. I was pretty miserable since I knew I wasn't accomplishing anything. At the end of things, she stepped in a bit and we cranked out a half-assed product before the deadline.

I imagine that's what it was like at BioWare. I actually suspect they would have been better off if EA had taken a very active role from the beginning.

Anyway, the problem was with BioWare's management certainly, but I do think to some extent the differing expectations of fans and EA were impossible to reconcile. There has yet to be a good online only, neverending revenue stream type of game that also has an excellent, discrete character-focused story on the level of past BioWare games. I think if EA had not required that constant revenue stream, BioWare's management, even in its diminished state, would have found the task much more surmountable and done a competent job. Progress would have been more steady and focused, morale would have been higher, people wouldn't quit and the finished product would have been much better.

Really no excuse for them not listening to The Old Republic's developers though to learn from their experience with a similar challenge... sheesh.

pyxistyx wrote:

I mean, horrible loot-box/games as services culture aside, the first Kotaku article made it sound like EA was pretty hands off with Anthem and Andromeda(?), with the bigger problem being Bioware management more than anything. That plus they've already long since chased away (or drained to the point of nervous breakdown) all of their best talent. It was only AFTER EA decided to get involved that they started to actually pull Anthem into something resembling a finished product.

* Unless there's a serious shift in the way they work on projects, I forsee this as just being a repeat of what happened last two times. And tbh, i don't know that i could support what they produce even if it turns out great, because they are literally working people until they are physically ill and forced to take leave / quit and that's seriously got to change.

Hands off at first with the exception of mandating that it be a game-as-a-service and that they use Frostbite.

Rykin wrote:

Hands off at first with the exception of mandating that it be a game-as-a-service and that they use Frostbite.

Neither of those was mandated. BioWare had always planned for Anthem to be a living multiplayer game, and they apparently chose Frostbite of their own volition during the development of Inquisition and chose to keep it.

I'm not going to wholly discount DA4 this far out, as I have absolutely no idea what that game will end up being. That said, the game they originally described flicked all of my switches, while the stuff that has occurred since has me feeling... concerned.

Ubrakto said pretty much everything I wanted to though. I'm hoping, but the hope is dimmed.

pyxistyx wrote:

I mean, horrible loot-box/games as services culture aside, the first Kotaku article made it sound like EA was pretty hands off with Anthem and Andromeda(?), with the bigger problem being Bioware management more than anything. That plus they've already long since chased away (or drained to the point of nervous breakdown) all of their best talent. It was only AFTER EA decided to get involved that they started to actually pull Anthem into something resembling a finished product.

* Unless there's a serious shift in the way they work on projects, I forsee this as just being a repeat of what happened last two times. And tbh, i don't know that i could support what they produce even if it turns out great, because they are literally working people until they are physically ill and forced to take leave / quit and that's seriously got to change.

Agreed. And if it wasn't for EA they would have dropped the one universally praised element from Anthem, the flying mechanic.

Is it too much to want a good follow-up to my favorite game franchise, and to want that follow-up to be good?

UpToIsomorphism wrote:

Is it too much to want a good follow-up to my favorite game franchise, and to want that follow-up to be good?

I get it. I want a Dead Space sequel as well.