Without nostalgia, is it still worth playing?

Oh, you have to. Act 4 and 5 are so good! You have to battle diablo 2.0 and Bael. Not to mention:
the ancients, the seals, hephasto, izual, the siege, nihlithak, the minions of destruction, etc.

Plus I would argue that nightmare and hell difficulties are where some classes finally shine *cough* frozen orb sorceress *cough*
Normal is for story. Nightmare is where the powerhouse classes gel.

Oh and warts on the EQ UI and all, I still enjoy the combat. It is pretty much every fight is a like a world boss. It is one of the things I love about WoW Legion: that a lot of classes can solo wandering named elites. It is a nice change of pace from 15 second kills.

Lord Of The Rings Online is 11 years old so I think it qualifies. I think that anyone interested in Lord of the rings might want to give it a try. For my money it’s the best LotR game ever made.

What makes it so good, 11 years later?

For me.. is if i can tolerate the controls and camera. Of course as well if the game is fun and enjoyable.

A perfect example -just for me- is the case of Ocarina of Time.. i havent been able to play the game no matter what. the controls just do not work for me.

jrralls wrote:

Lord Of The Rings Online is 11 years old so I think it qualifies. I think that anyone interested in Lord of the rings might want to give it a try. For my money it’s the best LotR game ever made.

I bounced off LOTR Online hard back in the day. I still remember it being cool that characters were playing real music in the towns.

I was wondering what you guys think of Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time? Is it worth going back to?

I bought it years ago when I found it on sale, but barely touched it.

I'm not sure this game is old enough for the nostalgia factor to kick in, but I know it was really well regarded when it came out and led to a couple other Prince of Persia games that were a bit more action-oriented. It's also not terribly long, which makes it a good candidate for clearing from my backlog.

At the same time, given that the game is 15 years old (WOW!) I am sure there are a lot of games that do what Prince of Persia did at the time, but much better. Still worth playing?

LastSurprise wrote:

I am sure there are a lot of games that do what Prince of Persia did at the time, but much better. Still worth playing?

I'm not sure that's true, honestly. The particular mix of mechanics, level design, and narrative delivery are still top-notch, and its sequels never surpassed it. I'd say give it a try, you might be surprised how well it holds up.

I, on the other hand, found Sands of Time infuriating when I played through it in early 2009 - rarely have I cursed as much while playing a game. I much preferred Prince of Persia (2008) when I played it late 2011, though I think I'm in the minority with that opinion.

I wouldn't necessarily put it over Sands of Time, but I really enjoyed PoP 2008.

I'm taking a slightly different approach here, and possibly missing the point of this thread, but I'm wondering if Crash Bandicoot: N. Sane Trilogy would be worth playing without the nostalgia of the original trilogy? I'm playing it now, and really enjoying the experience, but I honestly don't know if I'd recommend it to someone who never played these games on the PS1 and/or wasn't interested in older games.

I guess a similar question could be asked about recommending Sonic Mania someone to who never played the first three Sonic games. Anyone have any thoughts?

Flashback just hit the Switch eShop. I loved the original. Can I ever go home again or is this one better left in my memories?

The animations were so lifelike! Sadly, better left as a happy memory.

I'm playing Super Mario Bros 3 for the first time on the 3DS, since it was on sale. It definitely holds up. As one who never played an NES, I'm constantly impressed by the graphics and details and animations they were able to squeeze into this game.

Running Man wrote:

The animations were so lifelike! Sadly, better left as a happy memory.

Oh really, you wouldn't recommend it?

Stevintendo wrote:

I'm taking a slightly different approach here, and possibly missing the point of this thread, but I'm wondering if Crash Bandicoot: N. Sane Trilogy would be worth playing without the nostalgia of the original trilogy? I'm playing it now, and really enjoying the experience, but I honestly don't know if I'd recommend it to someone who never played these games on the PS1 and/or wasn't interested in older games.

I guess a similar question could be asked about recommending Sonic Mania someone to who never played the first three Sonic games. Anyone have any thoughts?

I can't opine on Sonic Mania, nor about Crash Bandicoot, but I was having kind of the reverse experience this weekend with Donkey Kong Country Returns.

When I first bought a Wii (a few years after it came out; for a while, I was behind the curve on games), I also bought Donkey Kong Country Returns, and I was expecting to recapture the thrill of I felt when playing DKC, or even DKC2: one of my favorite games ever, and (I think) a true classic. Then I fired up DKC Returns, and it was ... fine. But, I wasn't especially impressed and set it down pretty quickly, precisely because it didn't live up to my nostalgia.

This week, while home sick, I picked it up again to give it another try, and it's pretty fun! It's beautiful, the levels are well-designed -- although some are very frustrating, given the need for timing jumps and such -- and it definitely stands on its own as a solid game. Not revolutionary like DKC, nor iconic as DKC2, but a good game nonetheless.

gravity wrote:

Flashback just hit the Switch eShop. I loved the original. Can I ever go home again or is this one better left in my memories?

I play the SNES cart pretty regularly. I don’t know if the Switch version is exactly the same, but the main thing that might bother people these days is the check point system. The controls are a little slow by modern standards but it doesn’t take long to get used to them if you stick with it. However you may find yourself losing quite a bit of progress if you haven’t happened to trip a checkpoint recently.

I played the Vita version. I didn't get too far but it was a nice little nostalgia hit.

Sundown wrote:

I'm playing Super Mario Bros 3 for the first time on the 3DS, since it was on sale. It definitely holds up. As one who never played an NES, I'm constantly impressed by the graphics and details and animations they were able to squeeze into this game.

The NES was optimized for scrolling a tiled background; many computer games wouldn't have run well on it at all, but all the Super Marios really made that hardware sing. Probably, a lot of the fundamental design of the original games was based around what it offered, extrapolating its capabilities into game mechanics.

The SNES was enormously more capable; that was a seriously kickass little system. I think it might have been the last time that Nintendo was genuinely in the lead on hardware capabilities. In the right hands, that system was ridiculously good, given its transistor count and overall cost.

Malor wrote:

I think [the SNES] might have been the last time that Nintendo was genuinely in the lead on hardware capabilities.

I would count N64 too since it pretty much pioneered 3D polygon gaming, compared to its first competitor, Saturn, which was just a bigger Genesis. Dreamcast (hallowed be its memory), though, was on a different level, but that was well into the N64 lifecycle. PS1 came out about the same time as N64 and went a completely different tech-capability route but I didn’t try it much since I frankly hated the graphical style of most of the games. Maybe it was superior in horsepower? (But don’t try to convince me the CD-ROM was better than the cartridge; it took many years for load times on them to become tolerable.)

As to the tech of scrolling games and game design, there’s a wonderful discussion of John Carmack cheating the PC limitations to do that and led to the development of Commander Keen in David Kushner’s Masters of Doom.

IMAGE(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/53/Masters_of_doom-Book_cover.jpg/220px-Masters_of_doom-Book_cover.jpg)

Warriorpoet897 wrote:
gravity wrote:

Flashback just hit the Switch eShop. I loved the original. Can I ever go home again or is this one better left in my memories?

I play the SNES cart pretty regularly. I don’t know if the Switch version is exactly the same, but the main thing that might bother people these days is the check point system. The controls are a little slow by modern standards but it doesn’t take long to get used to them if you stick with it. However you may find yourself losing quite a bit of progress if you haven’t happened to trip a checkpoint recently.

Oh yeah I’d forgotten about the checkpoint system. That was annoying me even in the 90’s when I played it. The slow controls I think I could get used to, partially because I remember the feeling of moving around in that game. I'll have to think about dealing with checkpoints, that’d give me more pause than anything. Thank you!

This is exactly why I am reluctant to return to Baldur's Gate 1 & 2 despite the enhanced edition and the expansion linking both games. I look back fondly to these 20 year old games (wow I'm old), but I do remember how punishing they were, especially when you came across a mage or a lich that just decided he wasn't going to die. And healing potion and arrow hoarding was an absolute necessity.

Budo wrote:

This is exactly why I am reluctant to return to Baldur's Gate 1 & 2 despite the enhanced edition and the expansion linking both games. I look back fondly to these 20 year old games (wow I'm old), but I do remember how punishing they were, especially when you came across a mage or a lich that just decided he wasn't going to die. And healing potion and arrow hoarding was an absolute necessity.

Mage/lich fights were all basically the same...load up magic-users with that spell that takes down shield, wait for the enemy shield to come up (usually right away), remove it and then blast with damage spells and arrows/bolts. Done. Yep, arrow hoarding definitely a must!