RIP Anthony Bourdain

Dead at 61 of apparent suicide.

Too soon, obviously. f*cking brain weasels.

Yeah just got the news ping. Dang. Way too soon.

Folks who know me well know that I often say that I want to be Anthony Bourdain when I grow up. This is a tragedy. Whatever demons he was dealing with must have been significant. Peace to you, brother.

Oh sh*t.

This one hurts. Big time.

This was a gut punch to wake up to. He at least should've gotten to outlive Kissinger.

I re-listen to his Kitchen Confidential (read by himself) every year. He's been a huge inspiration to me for at least a decade. This makes me so sad. Time to re-read his portrait of Justo Thomas from Le Bernardin in Medium Raw. That's one great piece of writing.

This was awful to wake up to.

Paleocon wrote:

Folks who know me well know that I often say that I want to be Anthony Bourdain when I grow up. This is a tragedy. Whatever demons he was dealing with must have been significant. Peace to you, brother.

Same. His love of travel and adventure were examples for me. I watched his show for inspiration of where to travel next and what experiences to open myself up to while out there (all of them, was usually the lesson).

He is the reason I had a desire to travel in the first place, and he helped me to understand different cultures. Loved his books, loved his shows. He also is an inspiration - a recovering drug addict with no savings at 40; getting paid tons of money to travel the world and eat amazing food at 50. I feel bad for his daughter.

With such a hard life he led, one wonders if this is a Tony Scott situation: Where he got a health diagnosis he decided he didn't want to live through, or maybe there was a bad financial situation going on with his overly ambitious New York market thing. Or maybe I'm just trying to make sense of his suicide because it's always hard to grasp the reasoning why someone who seemed to have the life you idolize suffers from depression because it's better than accepting the truth.

Rest in Peace.

Horrible news. We're in the middle of watching No Reservations and are constantly struck by how genuine he is when encountering strangers from all walks of life, all over the world. Seemed like such a kind soul.

Yeah this one hit hard. RIP, a great talent is lost.

kuddles wrote:

With such a hard life he led, one wonders if this is a Tony Scott situation: Where he got a health diagnosis he decided he didn't want to live through

This is what I said when my wife told me about his suicide.

Honestly, as much as I might want it, I probably don't need a reason. It is what it is, reason or not.

Anthony was one of those guys many of us would have gladly traded careers with. I know he had some drug issues in the distant past, maybe he was hiding a current habit. Either way I don't want to speculate too much, better that we celebrate his efforts as a human to bring us all together at the dinner table.

I always wonder what medication the individual was taking. I’m part of a community of folks where we lose someone every month or so to the debilitating side effects of a specific medication. This news made me wonder if that’s what happened to him. In the end, though, there is usually not a rational reason, which is what makes it so awful.

You know, I never once saw the man until today, when I went and looked him up on YouTube. Yet, even so, I knew his name and that he was a great cook/chef. (not sure which wording he would have liked.) There's no doubt that his influence was massive and that his presence was global. I hope this loss at least inspires a few more people to ask for help. If depression can take out someone that talented and successful, at the height of his popularity and in the middle of creating something neat, it can happen to anyone, anywhere.

edit: the assumption that it was depression could be incorrect. As others are saying, there are other reasons why he might have made that choice, and I shouldn't project.

This news guts me. For quite some time he struck me as a person who was trying to get away from something. As if his inner demons got In the way of appreciating where he was. In recent years he seemed more at peace like he had reached a better inner perspective which matched the way he lived, with as little bullsh*t as possible. RIP Tony. You gave the world so much.

Malor wrote:

edit: the assumption that it was depression could be incorrect. As others are saying, there are other reasons why he might have made that choice, and I shouldn't project.

Regardless of what the reason is, I think speaking up about depression is fair in this context anyways. This news along with Kate Spade should make it clear that mental illness and personal demons don't automatically get fixed with financial success.

https://twitter.com/EvanBenn/status/...

He was a shining example of someone who saw the world purely, and treated all people as worthy. Twitter's talking about a lot of things, but one of the bits that's really hitting me is that his was pretty much the only show to treat Africans, Palestinians, Lebanese and other nationalities as *people* first, and people worthy of love and admiration.

My own small story with him is that I was once going to a cheesesteak place in midtown on a day off; it was fairly new, and out of the way, so the crowds hadn't hit it yet. I got there, and through the front, I saw Bourdain and Mario Batali sitting there and chowing down. My anxiety hit hard, and I just kept walking, because I was too shy to go up and say hi to them. I subsequently ran into Batali a couple of times when I started working near to his restaurants, but I never had a chance to meet Bourdain and tell him how important he was to me. And now I never will.

I can't find the exact quote, but I recall him saying the best meals you remember having usually aren't about the food you ate or the restaurant you were at, but the people you were with that made it special.

Rest in peace.

I think the place that made him a suit in 24 hours in Singapore offered to make me one, too.

I admired and took to heart his response to Paula Dean mocking him for eating a pig anus, which was basically Damn right I ate it, people offered me their traditional food, it would have been rude to recoil. Sad. Most of my newsfeed is in mourning, too.

Paleocon wrote:

Folks who know me well know that I often say that I want to be Anthony Bourdain when I grow up. This is a tragedy. Whatever demons he was dealing with must have been significant. Peace to you, brother.

I told my wife a few months ago the Anthony Bourdain was living the life I most wished I could duplicate.

This is really hard to take.

SpacePPoliceman wrote:

I admired and took to heart his response to Paula Dean mocking him for eating a pig anus, which was basically Damn right I ate it, people offered me their traditional food, it would have been rude to recoil.

Paula Deen having the audacity to mock anyone for their food choices is in itself wholly ridiculous.

RIP Anthony - one of the few people I would watch on TV where you felt they were telling you what they actually thought of something.

Let's hope the chefs in Heaven are on form today.

This is terrible.

f*ck.

This is devastating and hard to believe.

The sound quality is absolutely crap in this, but it's the only complete version I've found of this recommendation:

... in which he visits Waffle House, a restaurant I happen to rather like. I think of it as decent, cheap food made from staples, and in seeing his reactions, I'm getting an idea of why people liked the man so much.

People love to hate on Waffle House because it's so omnipresent, but it's so utterly omnipresent in the South for a reason. It feels like food your mom would cook you, entirely without pretense, but still tasty.

The whole episode (and the whole series of Parts Unknown) is on Netflix:
https://www.netflix.com/watch/800987...

Malor wrote:

... in which he visits Waffle House, a restaurant I happen to rather like. I think of it as decent, cheap food made from staples, and in seeing his reactions, I'm getting an idea of why people liked the man so much.

Anthony was cultured and reflective without being pretentious, and while he praised fine dining, he praised well-made fast food and home cooking just as much. He actually had a very angry attitude towards people who travel to other countries but don't take a risk on the street food that the locals eat.

This really sucks. I've watched and enjoyed a bunch of his shows over the years, and he always seemed like such an overwhelmingly positive guy. He'll be sorely missed.

I really started to get and really admire Anthony Bourdain on his No Reservations show on the Travel Channel. In particular, this episode when he got trapped in Lebanon when the Israelis began attacking. I found the entire episode (I think it was over two episodes, actually) fascinating.