[Discussion] On "Forgotten Americans"

Paleocon wrote:

There would certainly be a period of adjustment as infrastructure would have to be adjusted, but that externality is tiny when compared to the issues we already face because labor is not as fluid or fungible as capital.

Urban and Suburban housing prices seem to me to be less of a "tiny externality" and more of an "intractable problem". Right now there is both a really huge social push against increased affordable housing near cities (because people that live in affordable Urban housing are the sorts of people that will ruin your neighborhood (what's that, I feel like I'm barely hearing a high pitched whistling noise), millenials are much less anti-renting and renters than previous generations, but that still seems to be the dominant feeling in this country). Just as, and probably more importantly, there is the huge economic incentive for existing home-owner voters to block new housing development at any opportunity, because it makes their existing homes less valuable.

It is true that if there was a Federal initiative for this there may very well be something that can be done. Not all jurisdictions are as tough for new development (depending on whether ballot initiatives can let people write new laws to block development, or what the rules on public commentary and blocking of new zoning rules are). Identifying one or two cities that where this could be addressed, and sponsoring them as the destinations for people signing up for the public program, could be doable.

However, I think that would hurt you in Congress and with public opinion, it easily feeds into the narrative of government picking "winners" and "losers". It also pushes the immediacy of this solution into the timelines of other possibilities, as you may need to change local zoning and permitting laws, push through public complaints, then build new housing, either special housing just for members of this program, or much more housing, surpass pentup demand in the chosen cities, even before accounting for the new people.

I kind of really want to watch a TV show where someone moves their white family from Appalachia to the south side of Chicago.

Edit: A scripted show. I don't, generally, want any more unscripted shows.

wordsmythe wrote:

I kind of really want to watch a TV show where someone moves their white family from Appalachia to the south side of Chicago.

Edit: A scripted show. I don't, generally, want any more unscripted shows.

The Beverly Hillbillies?

I would pay to watch the scene where the Hillbilly father agonizes over whether to get a handgun carry license to protect his family from the surrounding thugs, who might knife him during a robbery or invade his house. He know that "an armed society is a safe, polite society" and comes to resent having to keep his weapons locked up. Besides, the thugs he worries about are aggressive and seem, well, racist.

He gradually comes to understand that if he's to protect his family, he needs to be able to provide enough show of force to deter the bad guys, so he gets his handgun carry license, regretting that he has to actually get permission for this. An armed society is a polite society; why do liberals not get that? And then in the next confrontation, he's determined to impose manners on these unruly thugs who are hanging out across the street from his house, catcalling his daughter and laughing at his reactions.

An armed society is a polite society, so of course they are not an *actual* danger to him; they'd never dare treat an *armed* man this way. He marches over, brandishes his Glock 17 and tells them to get the hell out, whereupon he's immediately confronted with six handguns and a compact Uzi. Welcome to your NRA dream, motherfcuker...

Jonman wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:

I kind of really want to watch a TV show where someone moves their white family from Appalachia to the south side of Chicago.

Edit: A scripted show. I don't, generally, want any more unscripted shows.

The Beverly Hillbillies?

Beverly's actually kinda suburban, but at the same time, it has a fairly remarkable history in terms of race.

Robear wrote:

I would pay to watch the scene where the Hillbilly father agonizes over whether to get a handgun carry license to protect his family from the surrounding thugs, who might knife him during a robbery or invade his house. He know that "an armed society is a safe, polite society" and comes to resent having to keep his weapons locked up. Besides, the thugs he worries about are aggressive and seem, well, racist.

He gradually comes to understand that if he's to protect his family, he needs to be able to provide enough show of force to deter the bad guys, so he gets his handgun carry license, regretting that he has to actually get permission for this. An armed society is a polite society; why do liberals not get that? And then in the next confrontation, he's determined to impose manners on these unruly thugs who are hanging out across the street from his house, catcalling his daughter and laughing at his reactions.

An armed society is a polite society, so of course they are not an *actual* danger to him; they'd never dare treat an *armed* man this way. He marches over, brandishes his Glock 17 and tells them to get the hell out, whereupon he's immediately confronted with six handguns and a compact Uzi. Welcome to your NRA dream, motherfcuker...

I like the way this shifted between "Good fences make good neighbors" mantra and a better version of Gran Torino.