[News] Around The Rest of World

A posting place for news from places around the globe, outside of the US/Europe.

"It belongs in a museum!".gif

Another mass grave at a residential school for Indigenous children in Saskatchewan, Canada was discovered. 751 unmarked graves were found at the site of the former residential school. The mass grave discovered earlier last month wasn't an anomaly and neither is this one. Expect a few more of these stories to popup in the coming weeks.

And just to be clear, this isn't some ancient history lesson. This residential school operated from 1899 to 1997, so while we were playing N64 games Indigenous kids were still being sent to this school.

Canada: 751 unmarked graves found at residential school

The Catholic Church once again showing the world what a beacon of morality and goodness it is...

I was about to post this in the political story thread, because, uh...

Canada...

What the f*ck have y'all been doing?

Same thing Australia and the US have been doing...

Yeah. It's no different than other colonies and just as horrific.

Yeah. China brings up that stuff every time we talk about the Uighurs.

Speaking of, Millennial/Xennial burnout appears to be a global issue:

China’s Downwardly Mobile Millennials Are Throwing in the Towel

An episode of the TV drama A Love for Dilemma (小舍得) aired in April that many on the platform Weibo felt perfectly captured the critique implied in the concept of involution.

In it, two characters compare the education system to an audience watching a show in a theater. If one person stands up to get an advantage over the others, then others must also stand up to see. And when inevitably people start standing on chairs to increase their advantage, everyone must stand on their chairs.

The show keeps playing regardless, and it’s not necessary to strain so much in order to experience it. That is, circumstances remain the same despite the exertion. There is no extra reward for the extra effort. Everyone is simply straining to secure an advantage because everyone else is — a stressful, meaningless, endless competition.

Last September, when a photo went viral of a Tsinghua University student working on his laptop while riding his bicycle, the internet crowned him “Tsinghua’s Involuted King.”

The suggestion was that he was one of the many students in China who will devote their youths to single-minded preparation for a future that will never be his. His is an intense expenditure with no payoff, metaphorically similar to agricultural development with no industrial breakthrough or an intricate design pattern that collapses in on itself forever.

To be fair, I think this is one of those "a minority of people are doing this but not nearly enough to seriously call it a movement" kind of things.

Gonna file this one under "sh*t that probably should've happened already."

OG_slinger wrote:

The Catholic Church once again showing the world what a beacon of morality and goodness it is...

They are nothing if not consistent

Prederick wrote:

I was about to post this in the political story thread, because, uh...

Canada...

What the f*ck have y'all been doing?

it's not isolated to Canada. The US, Australia, Ireland. Pretty much all of Albion and/or Vatican's captive children take after their parents.

A funny thing about colonised populations...

Djinn wrote:

And just to be clear, this isn't some ancient history lesson. This residential school operated from 1899 to 1997, so while we were playing N64 games Indigenous kids were still being sent to this school.
residential school.

I used to give rides to a woman who regularly rented from us, and we would talk. She told me her story. It was...bleak? Dehumanizing? Horrific? It wasn't until she was middle-aged that she was able to find her mom and brother again. They never found the rest.

Canada has a new Governor General.

Simon was one of the senior Inuit negotiators during the repatriation of the Canadian Constitution, during First Minister Meetings that took place from 1982 to 1992, as well as during the 1992 Charlottetown Accord discussions. She is also formerly Ambassador to Denmark, Chair of the Arctic Council, and other diplomatic/NGO posts.

Note she is bilingual (English, Inuktitut), but has acknowledged her poor french skills, saying the teachers at the Governmental school in Quebec didn't permit them to learn french. She has indicated her goal to improve her french and has hired a tutor to help her.

Djinn wrote:

Another mass grave at a residential school for Indigenous children in Saskatchewan, Canada was discovered. 751 unmarked graves were found at the site of the former residential school. The mass grave discovered earlier last month wasn't an anomaly and neither is this one. Expect a few more of these stories to popup in the coming weeks.

And just to be clear, this isn't some ancient history lesson. This residential school operated from 1899 to 1997, so while we were playing N64 games Indigenous kids were still being sent to this school.

Canada: 751 unmarked graves found at residential school

The American Conservative had a supremely hot take on this:

The Meaning Of The Native Graves
They're good, actually.

The American Conservative wrote:

...

It would not be the last church burned in the land whose heavenly patron is now St. Jean de Brébeuf. In recent weeks, nine Canadian churches, both Catholic and Anglican, have been subjected to arson attacks. Many more have been otherwise vandalized to varying degrees. The popular narrative, broadcast by an astonishingly credulous media, is that previously unknown mass graves of children were discovered just this summer on the grounds of Indian residential schools and, in a rash of grief and righteous anger, indigenous protestors swept across the nation desecrating churches.

It is very important to note that the entire story is made up. First, we have always known that many children died in the residential schools, which were active through the 19th and 20th centuries. Child mortality was relatively high during that period to begin with; Indian mortality overall was astronomically high; and the Church-run schools for native children were systemically underfunded by the government, resulting in subpar facilities and inadequate medical care. Second, the sites almost certainly include the graves of Christian adults from the neighboring communities, as Chief Cadmus Delorme of the Cowessess First Nation admitted with respect to the Marieval Indian Residential School, where an estimated 751 burials were detected by radar last month. The “mass graves” of public hysteria are, in fact, the ordered and intentional burial sites of people we always knew were dead, and who died of more or less natural causes. In more literate times, we might have called that a cemetery.

People die, and when they die, you put them in the ground. There is nothing inherently scandalous about this. When the burial site of the 1636 Feast of the Dead was excavated in 1947, the only outrage—justified, mind you—was directed at those who uncovered it, and in so doing disturbed and desecrated the sacred resting ground.

This is not to discount the deaths of children altogether. Of course, it would have been better if each and every one of the First Nations tykes Christianized by the union of Church and state had lived a long and happy life. But it is absolutely to discount the blame fixed on the Church by vicious opportunists. If anyone is at fault here—and the residential school system, for all the good of its evangelizing purpose, was hardly without flaws—it is, without a doubt, the secular authority. Had the Canadian government, which in word endorsed the Christian mission of the residential schools, upheld that word in deed by providing the funding which Church authorities repeatedly said was necessary for adequate operation, living conditions could have been improved and a great many premature deaths avoided.

But this failure of the secular authority to sufficiently serve the Church does not in any way indict that Christian mission. And make no mistake, the residential schools were first and foremost Christian. Those who ministered to the Indians a century ago did so, like Jean de Brébeuf three centuries before, out of a sincere concern for the salvation of their souls. The political utility recognized by the Canadian government—that, as one bureaucrat put it early on, “the North American Indian cannot be civilized or preserved in a state of civilization (including habits of industry and sobriety) except in connection with, if not by the influence of, not only religious instruction and sentiment but of religious feelings”—is secondary. Likewise, the certain fact that souls were saved by the missionaries, the enduring belief of Christians that the Gospel is true and must be spread, is paramount; everything else is secondary.

Whatever good was present at the Ossossané ossuary—where those who had not yet encountered the fullness of Truth honored their dead as best they knew how—is increased a thousandfold in the cemeteries of the residential schools, where baptized Christians were given Christian burials. Whatever natural good was present in the piety and community of the pagan past is an infinitesimal fraction of the grace rendered unto those pagans’ descendants who have been received into the Church of Christ. Whatever sacrifices were exacted in pursuit of that grace—the suffocation of a noble pagan culture; an increase in disease and bodily death due to government negligence; even the sundering of natural families—is worth it.

It must be, else two millennia of Christian civilization, in which oceans have been bridged, wars waged, continents conquered, and the lives of a million Jean de Brébeufs given in service to the Lord’s final commandment—Going therefore, teach ye all nations; baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world.—all has been for nought.

It must be very intoxicating to know that any horrible thing you do will be excused or justified if you claim you did it in the name of God.

Reading that last paragraph, he’s so close to getting it…

It wasn’t our fault, the government didn’t give the richest religious organization in the world enough money to do things properly, so they died in uncomfortable circumstances. Maybe if they had funded the Church directly through taxation, things might have been different.

But hey, everyone in those days died young. These kids are no different, even if they’d had more food and comforts they’d probably still have died young.

We wanted to save their souls, not run hospitals. We’re priests, not doctors, sorry.

Anyway, lots of them might not have been kids at all, so it’s okay they died and were buried in mass graves. They got Christian burials so what’s the problem?

And we had to do it - there was no other way to instill the virtues of modern life into them. How else could they be assimilated into the workforce?

Finally, it was all done to bring them to Christ, so at least they died with the comfort of Christian beliefs, and that’s the object of it all anyway.

Don’t forget, “We cannot change our interpretation of these events, because if we do we’ll have to face that we did awful, awful things.”

Wow. That article is rage-inducing. Anyone who could read the TRC Report and still write this is irredeemable as a human, and anyone who could write this without reading at least some of the report is irredeemable as a journalistic professional.

Of course he's not redeemable. Just Forgiven, so really, as long as his exegetical lies might convince someone, it's all in the same good cause as rescuing the souls of those benighted native children from darkness.

(Bitter? Why yes, why do you ask?)

BushPilot wrote:

Wow. That article is rage-inducing. Anyone who could read the TRC Report and still write this is irredeemable as a human, and anyone who could write this without reading at least some of the report is irredeemable as a journalistic professional.

I mean...

OG_slinger wrote:
The American Conservative wrote:

Whatever natural good was present in the piety and community of the pagan past is an infinitesimal fraction of the grace rendered unto those pagans’ descendants who have been received into the Church of Christ. Whatever sacrifices were exacted in pursuit of that grace—the suffocation of a noble pagan culture; an increase in disease and bodily death due to government negligence; even the sundering of natural families—is worth it.

He literally says that it's okay that we got them killed, ripped their families apart, and destroyed their culture because we brought their descendants around to the "correct" religion.

Not figuratively. LITERALLY.

"Any sacrifice is worth it", says person who didn't sacrifice anything.

Rage-inducing indeed.

Keldar wrote:

"Any sacrifice is worth it", says person who didn't sacrifice anything.

Even worse:
“Any sacrifice we demand is worth it,” says person who would demand sacrifices if they could.

Prederick wrote:

Gonna file this one under "sh*t that probably should've happened already."

Consequence of this is what we've been going through the last few days.

https://www.news24.com/news24/southa...

Myself and our family are personally safe right now. But all industrial and warehousing districts are being looted and burned down.

The issue goes deeper than Zuma's arrest, but that was the spark.

MrDeVil909 wrote:
Prederick wrote:

Gonna file this one under "sh*t that probably should've happened already."

Consequence of this is what we've been going through the last few days.

https://www.news24.com/news24/southa...

Myself and our family are personally safe right now. But all industrial and warehousing districts are being looted and burned down.

The issue goes deeper than Zuma's arrest, but that was the spark.

Hope you and your family are still doing fine. Here in my neck of the woods (North West province) its all quiet. Looks all kinds of crazy in Kwazulu and southern parts of Gauteng.

KramNesnah wrote:

Hope you and your family are still doing fine. Here in my neck of the woods (North West province) its all quiet. Looks all kinds of crazy in Kwazulu and southern parts of Gauteng.

Yeah, we're fine thanks. We're far enough away from the major areas being raided that we're out of direct risk, but can still smell warehouses being burned down.

It looks like things may be settling down. Taxi associations are due to start running again and stores are opening.

I'm just glad I do my monthly grocery shopping so we haven't had to stress about food or essentials.

Given the history there, is it a cultural norm for families to be prepared for periods of civil unrest? Here, it's considered a sort of paranoid subculture associated with the far Right... We have supplies for storms, sure, but beyond that is kind of unusual. At the same time, a disruption of the sort you're having now would be unprecedented in modern American history.

Sometimes I think we are just pushing our like with a faith in law and order and complex supply chains.

David’s time in South Africa draws to a close in Orania, where he meets a small group of Afrikaner nationalists before moving further north to Randfontein and meeting the Suidlander survivalists.

The Dark Tourism documentary series showed some of the armed preppers convinced that "the bleks" were going to seize their land Any Day Now.

Robear wrote:

Given the history there, is it a cultural norm for families to be prepared for periods of civil unrest? Here, it's considered a sort of paranoid subculture associated with the far Right... We have supplies for storms, sure, but beyond that is kind of unusual. At the same time, a disruption of the sort you're having now would be unprecedented in modern American history.

Sometimes I think we are just pushing our like with a faith in law and order and complex supply chains.

Not really. We don't have any extravagant supplies built up. The closest we've got was last year when the covid rumblings started and everyone was suddenly buying toilet paper (as seen across most of the world)... My wife went grocery shopping as usual and then came back with one additional bag of sugar, which she claimed was her emergency supply ration that she would want to have

I do however live in an area that has largish supply of right wing nut jobs, and if I would have to hazard a guess, they would probably be ready to live for a few extended months without having access to the usual supplies.