[News] All Around The World

A posting place for news from places around the globe, outside of the US/Europe.

Worse than current US yes. Historically is more debatable.

Well they have their concentration camps, we have our concentration camps. At least they take care of their citizens unlike the US. I think it’ll be interesting to see how China leads as their global influence grows. I highly doubt they’ll inflict the international suffering that the US has. We are and have been the true evil empire. Honestly, if it wasn’t a country of yellow people, I think they’d be viewed in a much more favorable light.

Docjoe wrote:

Well they have their concentration camps, we have our concentration camps. At least they take care of their citizens unlike the US. I think it’ll be interesting to see how China leads as their global influence grows. I highly doubt they’ll inflict the international suffering that the US has. We are and have been the true evil empire. Honestly, if it wasn’t a country of yellow people, I think they’d be viewed in a much more favorable light.

If you really feel that way, then you should definitely be hoping Trump gets re-elected. I mean, he's a pushover on the world stage and no one has done more to undercut American power to influence international events.

If the U.S. is no better than the PRC, and you think the world will be a better place the faster China replaces America on the world stage, then you should definitely be rooting for the Trump family holding the White House for as long as possible. Because nothing will shuffle America off the world stage faster than that.

Docjoe wrote:

Well they have their concentration camps, we have our concentration camps. At least they take care of their citizens unlike the US. I think it’ll be interesting to see how China leads as their global influence grows. I highly doubt they’ll inflict the international suffering that the US has. We are and have been the true evil empire. Honestly, if it wasn’t a country of yellow people, I think they’d be viewed in a much more favorable light.

You’re delusional. And it’s an opinion you can afford to have as America looks inwards. Meanwhile, many of China’s neighbours that have been overly reliant on the American security umbrella are in for a rude awakening.

There is no modern American comparison that comes close to the genocide being undertaken against Uighurs right now. Who are Chinese citizens last I checked.

China literally already has an AI powered surveillance system called skynet because the creator likes The Terminator.

The Chinese government gives you a social score based on what you do online. A low score means you can't leave the country.

China's concentration camps are holding more than a million people. The US maybe has thousands?

The Chinese government bans access to Twitter and Facebook (oh wait sorry I'm listing negatives)

Modern mainstream Chinese movies uniformly suck. Look what happened to Zhang Yimou.

Chinese people are forgetting their history, sometimes to the point where they get in trouble for unwittingly acknowledging it.

Chinese healthcare is terrible. They do not take care of their people.

The Chinese government has banned Winnie the Pooh.

But the food is good.

Chairman_Mao wrote:

The Chinese government gives you a social score based on what you do online. A low score means you can't leave the country.

Or even travel by train out of the province.

We shouldn't forget that China has its own BLM history.
China says it has a 'zero-tolerance policy' for racism, but discrimination towards Africans goes back decades

Chairman_Mao wrote:

China's concentration camps are holding more than a million people. The US maybe has thousands?

And let's not forget the organ harvesting. China murders their prisoners -- mostly minorities they don't like such as the Falun Gong -- and harvests their organs to sell to the highest bidder.

Chairman_Mao wrote:

The Chinese government has banned Winnie the Pooh.

I must have missed the cartoon where he said "Free Hong Kong" to Tigger.

Rat Boy wrote:
Chairman_Mao wrote:

The Chinese government has banned Winnie the Pooh.

I must have missed the cartoon where he said "Free Hong Kong" to Tigger.

it's dumber than that. There was a meme about how the Party Leader kind of looked like Pooh, so they banned the entire thing.

Jeyaraj and Beniks: Indian deaths in custody spark national debate about police brutality

When shop owners P Jeyaraj and his son J Beniks were taken into custody, the pair was accused of committing a minor offence: keeping their store open for 15 minutes after curfew.

Four days later, both men were dead after allegedly being beaten, sexually assaulted and tortured at the hands of local police.

The case, in the south Indian town of Santhankulam, is seen as a monumental failure by multiple levels of India's justice system.

How did a minor infraction result in two deaths?

On a Friday in mid-June, Jeyaraj was taken into custody to be questioned about whether his timber shop was open recently beyond curfew.

His son arrived soon after and tried to intervene as a police officer repeatedly slapped his father.

The pair was then taken to the station's cells, where they were held overnight.

Nearby residents heard the men scream for help throughout the evening as they were allegedly assaulted.

"They were wailing and shouting," said Robin Stanley, a lawyer who spoke to the ABC on behalf of a non-English speaking local witness who was outside the police station.

"They were beaten throughout the night. They were tortured. They were beaten in the buttocks and back. The flesh was crushed and torn to pieces."

The following morning, the father and son were bloodied, swollen, bruised and hobbling as they were taken to a local hospital for treatment, before seeing a magistrate.

Lawyers claim the magistrate was given a fake medical certificate, and the court did not ask the pair about their physical condition or if they understood the charges, despite being required to do so by law.

The father and son were sent to a local jail, where their condition deteriorated.

Three days later, 31-year-old Beniks died after developing respiratory problems. His 60-year-old dad died soon after.

The only charges filed were against the son: breaching curfew and obstructing police from doing their duties.

A preliminary post mortem identified "grave" injuries throughout their bodies, but the family is now awaiting a more comprehensive report.

Chilling.

Hong Kong was once a home for critics of Beijing. Now they might not even be safe at the airport

A year ago, Chinese-Australian dissident artist Badiucao was searching for a place in Hong Kong to display some of his political works, many of which are critical of the Chinese Communist Party.

Now he says he wouldn't even transfer through Hong Kong airport for fear of being arrested under the city's new national security law.
That's because the legislation, which came into effect late Tuesday, doesn't only clamp down on freedoms at home. It also puts foreign citizens who criticize the Chinese government anywhere in the world at risk of jail if they even set foot in the city -- even if they are just transiting through the airport.
"It's really concerning and terrifying, not just for residents in Hong Kong but anyone who cares about human rights in Hong Kong and human rights in China, in general," said Badiucao from his home in Melbourne, Australia.

The law introduces four new crimes: secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with a foreign country, which carry maximum sentences of life in prison.
Its primarily focus is on stopping local dissent. Yet section 38 has caught the eye of legal experts globally.
"This law shall apply to offenses under this law committed against the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region from outside the region by a person who is not a permanent resident of the region," is the unofficial translation of section 38 by state-run news agency Xinhua.
In short, even people who are not Chinese citizens and live outside of Hong Kong can fall foul of the new legislation.
Mainland China has a similar law, section 8 of the criminal code, but it can only apply if the crime is punishable in both China and the foreign country -- which means speaking out against the Communist Party likely would not be covered.
But section 38 of the Hong Kong national security law has no such exception. The act committed abroad only has to be considered a crime in Hong Kong.
The law isn't retroactive, which means that anything said or done before July 1, 2020, won't be taken into account. But for artists like Badiucao, who has no intention of stopping criticizing governments in his work, or displaying previous art that was political, the law could apply as soon as he sets foot inside Hong Kong -- even though he is now an Australian citizen.
Dissidents aren't the only people who are worried, either, as Western academics could be rethinking their travel to Hong Kong. Maggie Lewis, an expert in contemporary Chinese law at Seton Hall University, said she would now consider the risk differently every time she traveled the city.
"If you aren't thinking through what you did outside Hong Kong before you enter Hong Kong, I don't think you're going through the necessary thought process to be careful," she said.

I already had no plans to ever visit China. I think there are at least a couple of Australian citizens (of Chinese origin) currently in detention on the mainland for unannounced charges. The Australian government is doing what it can I guess...

This seems like a better-written version of the Terrorism law the Phillipines recently passed.

I'm not up on that, how exactly do they compare?

The Phillipines news I read recently was about a backlash against their pivot to China and China's continual territorial encroachments.

Philippine Congress approves anti-terror law more ‘urgent’ than coronavirus

On Monday, Defence Secretary Delfin Lorenzana attempted to assure the public, insisting there were enough safeguards to prevent abuses, especially by law enforcers, and that arguments opposing the bill were “baseless”. Soon before the bill’s passage on Wednesday, Lorenzana assured the public that “anybody who makes a peaceful protest [against the government] – they are not terrorists.”

Interior and local governments secretary Eduardo Ano said the law was “for everyone’s safety and this was carefully thought out”.

Still, rights activists insisted the measure could be used by the government to pursue critics of the president in addition to terrorists.

Former congressman Teodoro Casino said he expected to be arrested under the law, as his party, Bayan Muna, had been referred to in some official documents as a front for a ‘communist terror group’ – even though it had not been designated as such by the courts.

“Even now, many of our members, including myself, have been falsely charged and arrested for much more established and well-defined crimes,” said Casino. “What more for such a vague and broadly defined crime as terrorism under this new law?”

Aside from the vague definition of “terrorist act”, Dean Sta. Maria said there were problems with the idea of the Anti-Terror Council.

He said the creation of the body would take the country back to the abusive years of the Ferdinand Marcos’ dictatorship when the notorious Asso orders (arrest, search and seizure order) could be issued by a civil administrative body, the Ministry of Defence.

Under the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020, the Anti-Terror Council would have the power to order arrests without warrants and detentions, he said.

“[Asso] was one of the greatest lessons we learned from martial law [under Marcos]. That if you leave [that power] with an administrative body, it can easily be abused. Having that lesson, we made the 1987 Constitution specifically limit the issuing power to the courts,” he said.

“Now, with this law, we are going back.”

Highest percentage of sh*tty world leaders in history?

China's national security law leaves Hong Kong citizens vulnerable, and presents Scott Morrison with a choice

"We meet here to show our support for the Chinese people and to reaffirm our commitment to the ideals of democracy and freedom of expression. We meet here reflecting on the very future of China."

That was prime minister Bob Hawke in 1989, in one of his most memorable and emotional speeches, reflecting on the atrocity of the Tiananmen Square massacre.

Without consulting his Cabinet, Hawke instinctively offered asylum to Chinese students and eventually their families. It led to 42,000 Chinese nationals ultimately resettling in Australia.

Scott Morrison faces a moment with striking parallels and 31 years on, he has an opportunity to be just as bold.

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong aren't being mowed down with tanks, but they are being rounded up in their hundreds under a draconian new "national security" law imposed by Beijing.

Under the law, the people of Hong Kong can be jailed for life for engaging in vaguely defined acts of "secession, subversion, terrorism or collusion with foreign forces". This can include anything that broadly provokes "hatred" of the Chinese Government. One of the first to be arrested was a man merely holding an independence flag.

Worryingly, the law can also apply to citizens and non-citizens who aren't even in Hong Kong. So, attending a pro-democracy rally in Sydney or Melbourne or openly criticising the Chinese Communist Party could potentially put someone in danger of arrest should they one day visit Hong Kong.

From China's perspective, any move to help pro-democracy activists flee Hong Kong equates to "meddling" in its internal affairs. This is about sovereignty and territorial integrity. Beijing will be far more upset about this than Australia's Strategic Update plans to buy more high-tech defence kit.

Whatever the immediate backlash may be, the view in Canberra is that clear lines must be drawn for the longer-term good.

Hong Kong libraries see pro-democracy books removed after national security law introduced

Books by prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy figures have become unavailable in the Chinese-ruled city's public libraries as they are being reviewed to see whether they violate a new national security law, a government department said.

I applaud their openness... I guess?

Bob Hawke was a legend. He paved the way for my parents and siblings (I was then unborn) to be resettled in Australia as refugees from the Khmer civil war/genocide. I will be sure to toast his name the next time I down a drink.

As to HK, the writing has been on the wall as to the demise of the special administrative region concessions extended to its territory. It was only a matter of time as to when annexation and assimilation would occur. That said, China's modern profile needs to be understood in full context however. People easily forget the atrocities the British inflicted with the opium wars and sacking of Beijing, the Japanese occupation etc. They are in many ways right to be wary of foreign powers. So too should every nation.

I will also point out that the BLM has raised my awareness of how atrocious Murica has treated its Black Americans with the so called Jim Crow laws and systemic disenfranchisement and suppression/exploitation/murder of its own citizens and more recently with the separation/incarceration of foreign children. Not that Australia with its White Australia and stolen generation or the more recent imprisonment of asylum seekers can say it has clean hands either.

Tldr; the world is full of evil. We should call it out as it is and not seek to compare horrors - they are each their own tragedy which should never have happened.

100%. The problem is how the CCP uses that history to fuel nationalist sentiments and crush domestic opposition. Hardly a unique strategy but proving incredibly successful. Also, much of the territory that the CCP regards as rightfully belonging to the Chinese Empire, and has incorporated or is currently seeking to incorporate, really isn’t in any historical context.

For many countries however, it’s a case of don’t bite the hand that feeds, whether through free trade agreements or loans for infrastructure projects that are inevitably awarded to Chinese companies and staffed by Chinese workers.

I’ve been listening to Behind the Bastards podcast series, lots of context there for BLM as someone who isn’t familiar with it. Also, the current Hardcore History series is covering the Pacific theatre of WWII including quite a bit about Japanese colonisation efforts in China and atrocities committed there before and during the war.

Mexico's president has his own plane. So why is he flying commercial to meet Trump?

Officially, the Mexican government purchased a 787-8 Boeing Dreamliner for presidential use back in 2012. The plane's price tag was a whopping $218.7 million.

López Obrador, a leftist known for his populist positions and strong base among lower income communities, had long decried the plane as a notorious example of government excess and vowed to never use it.
The plane has been up for sale for more than a year (asking price: $130 million), but López Obrador has struggled to find a buyer. The government keeps it at an airfield in Los Angeles, California, and still pays for its maintenance and storage.

López Obrador said earlier this year he would sell tickets and raffle off the plane to the winner. But what, exactly, would the lucky raffle winner do with a wide-body jet engine passenger aircraft? He later changed his proposition, saying he would still sell tickets to cover the cost of the plane but, instead of gifting the plane itself to the winner, would instead give a 20 million Mexican pesos cash prize to 100 winners, the equivalent of roughly $900,000.

Meanwhile, attempts to sell or lease the plane will continue.

Critics say López Obrador's unwillingness to use that plane, or another plane from Mexico's Air Force, is a cheap political stunt designed to appeal to the many Mexican voters who will never be able to afford a plane ticket.

Supporters have backed his stance, saying boarding a plane with wide leather seats, a double bed, and a spacious bathroom with a shower would be unconscionable with so many Mexicans struggling with poverty.
No matter which side you fall on, flying commercial is definitely the cheapest option. A Kayak.com search over the weekend for a one-stop, roundtrip Mexico City -- Washington, DC, ticket, leaving Tuesday and returning Thursday, was a little more than $1,100 USD per person.

I like the sentiment, a little worried for the President's safety but I imagine they've considered the risks.

TikTok pulls out of Hong Kong as police get sweeping new powers

TikTok is to pull its app from Hong Kong app stores and Zoom will stop complying with city authorities’ data requests as social media companies react to the sweeping new national security laws imposed on the city by Beijing.

TikTok, which is owned by China-based ByteDance, has consistently denied sharing any user data with authorities in China, and was adamant it did not intend to begin to agree to such requests. The company expected to take several days to wind-down app operations in Hong Kong.

The decision, which a spokesperson said was made “in light of recent events”, came after the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, said the US was “certainly looking at” banning Chinese social media apps including TikTok. Microsoft, Google, Whatsapp, Facebook, and Telegram have all said they had paused cooperation with data requests from Hong Kong authorities pending human rights reviews, putting pressure on Apple to do likewise.

Just hours after Tik Tok’s announcement, the video conferencing platform Zoom told Hong Kong Free Press it would also stop complying with data requests from Hong Kong authorities.

A spokesman for Zoom said the company “supports the free and open exchange of thoughts and ideas”.

“We’re actively monitoring the developments in Hong Kong SAR, including any potential guidance from the U.S. government. We have paused processing any data requests from, and related to, Hong Kong SAR.”

Mr GT Chris wrote:

I'm not up on that, how exactly do they compare?

The Phillipines news I read recently was about a backlash against their pivot to China and China's continual territorial encroachments.

The Philippine "Anti-Terror Law" defines "terrorism" as

"acts intended to cause death or serious bodily injury to any person or endangers a person's life."

"acts intended to cause extensive damage or destruction to a government or public facility, public place, or private property."

"acts intended to cause extensive interference with, damage, or destroy critical infrastructure (including virtual)."

"develops, manufactures, possesses, acquires, transports, supplies, or uses weapons, explosives, or biological, nuclear, radiological, or chemical weapons;"

"Release of dangerous substances, or causing fire, floods, or explosions."

On top of how broad and vague all these possible offenses are, you can be arrested and held for 14 days without being charged. Also, if you threaten to commit any of these acts, that's also a crime, so don't go around saying "We might as well burn it all to the ground," as that is apparently threat to commit terrorism.

You could also be accused of participating in the planning of any of those vague things, and that's life. Coming to an agreement with another person concerning the commission of any of the above is conspiracy to commit terrorism and is 12 years.

The TLDR of all this is they can arrest you for nothing, make up all manner of vague accusations, and then hold you for life even as they themselves shoot innocent people on corners.

LarryC wrote:

The TLDR of all this is they can arrest you for nothing, make up all manner of vague accusations, and then hold you for life even as they themselves shoot innocent people on corners.

If you keep talking like this you'll summon Steve Bannon.

Chinese embassy says upgraded travel warning for Australians in China 'completely ridiculous'

The Chinese embassy has slammed government travel advice warning Australians they are at risk of "arbitrary detention" in China, labelling the advisory "disinformation" and "ridiculous".

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) issued the new advice on Tuesday, directing it at Australians in mainland China.

It also said Chinese authorities had detained foreigners for "endangering national security".

In a statement released on Wednesday, China's embassy in Canberra fiercely criticised the warning.

"This is completely ridiculous and disinformation," it said.

"Foreigners in China, including the Australians, as long as they abide by the Chinese laws, have no need to worry at all.

"However those who engage in illegal activities, such as drug smuggling or espionage, will be dealt with according to the laws in China, as is the case in all other countries."

I'm sure the Australian citizens currently held are happy to know they will soon be released.

Hong Kong citizens offered extended Australian visas as extradition agreement suspended amid China crackdown

Australia will extend the visas of some Hong Kong citizens in response to China's crackdown on personal freedoms and dissent, Prime Minister Scott Morrison says.
The changes apply to people already in Australia, offering safe haven and a path to permanent residency.

Temporary work visa holders and student visa holders currently in Australia will have their visas extended, allowing them to stay in Australia for five years.

They will have the opportunity to apply for permanent residency after that period.

It is understood the changes will affect about 10,500 students, and 1,500 people on other relevant visas, most of whom are already in Australia.

Australia is also suspending its extradition agreement with Hong Kong.

Mr Morrison said the agreement was on hold because the new laws represented a "fundamental change in circumstances".

The travel advice for Hong Kong has been upgraded and now warns that Australians who visit the city "may be at increased risk of detention on vaguely defined national security grounds".

I was actually surprised to note that there was still an extradition agreement in place since there had been cases of Hong Kong residents quietly being extradited to the mainland even prior to the new security law.

And like clockwork...
Chinese embassy accuses Australia of violating international law after Hong Kong visa extensions announced

In a statement, China's embassy in Canberra said it "strongly deplores and opposes the groundless accusations and measures announced by the Australian Government".

"Which is a serious violation of international law and basic norms governing international relations, and a gross interference in China's internal affairs.

"Hong Kong affairs are China's internal affairs. The Australian side has been clanking that they oppose 'foreign interference'. However, they have blatantly interfered in China's internal affairs by making irresponsible remarks on Hong Kong-related issues.

"Its hypocrisy and double standard is exposed in full."

China issues upgraded travel warning for Australia

Chinese authorities have ratcheted up their travel advice for Australia, alleging Australian law enforcement agencies have been "arbitrarily" searching Chinese citizens and seizing their possessions.

Cancel your vacations!

The travel advice is largely redundant, as Australia's borders remain closed to all but citizens and permanent residents.

Never mind.

Mr GT Chris wrote:

China issues upgraded travel warning for Australia

Chinese authorities have ratcheted up their travel advice for Australia, alleging Australian law enforcement agencies have been "arbitrarily" searching Chinese citizens and seizing their possessions.

Cancel your vacations!

The travel advice is largely redundant, as Australia's borders remain closed to all but citizens and permanent residents.

Never mind.

Nothing but pro forma retaliation for Australia offering asylum to hong kong refugees.

It's funny that China would rant about ignoring international law and hypocrisy while also continuing to ignore the Hague ruling about the West Philippine Sea.