[News] All Around The World

A posting place for news from places around the globe, outside of the US/Europe.

They released him back to the cartel. I guess the cartel really does run Mexico.

Yes, apparently, what happened was they found him, and a real-life version of Payday: The Heist happened, except with the sides switched and real bullets. Just a never-ending line of Cartel gangsters showing up and shooting everything to sh*t and causing so much chaos, the police went "this ain't worth it."

The commercial district of Culiacán resembled a battlefield with cars and jeeps set on fire and a large deployment of military vehicles.

Panic spread in the city as sustained fighting took place between scores of cartel gunmen - in pick-up trucks with machine guns mounted on them - and a large deployment of police and the military.

In the middle of the chaos, a jail break involving a number of prisoners also apparently took place in the city as the cartel tried to sow greater confusion in the effort to recover their leader.

Speaking of El Chapo...

The hunt for Asia’s El Chapo

The Asia-Pacific region is awash in crystal meth. A multinational task force is on the trail of a China-born Canadian national who, police tell Reuters, is the suspected kingpin of a vast drug network that is raking in up to $17 billion a year.
He is Asia’s most-wanted man. He is protected by a guard of Thai kickboxers. He flies by private jet. And, police say, he once lost $66 million in a single night at a Macau casino.

Tse Chi Lop, a Canadian national born in China, is suspected of leading a vast multinational drug trafficking syndicate formed out of an alliance of five of Asia’s triad groups, according to law enforcement officials. Its members call it simply “The Company.” Police, in a nod to one of Tse’s nicknames, have dubbed it Sam Gor, Cantonese for “Brother Number Three.”

The syndicate, law enforcers believe, is funneling tonnes of methamphetamine, heroin and ketamine to at least a dozen countries from Japan in North Asia to New Zealand in the South Pacific. But meth – a highly addictive drug with devastating physical and mental effects on long-term users – is its main business, they say.

In what it calls a conservative estimate, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) puts the Sam Gor syndicate’s meth revenue in 2018 at $8 billion a year, but says it could be as high as $17.7 billion. The UN agency estimates that the cartel, which often conceals its drugs in packets of tea, has a 40% to 70% share of the wholesale regional meth market that has expanded at least fourfold in the past five years.

Prediction based on a photo I saw earlier: Oscar Isaac will be cast to play El Chapo's son in a future season of Narcos: Mexico.

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Yowza. My only argument against is that Oscar Isaac is 10 years older than Ovidio, but Netflix has that The Irishman technology, so anything's possible now.

How about that dude from El Casa de Papel. Denver?

So! It appears to have emphatically Not Gone Well.

CULIACAN, Mexico (AP) — Mexican security forces aborted an attempt to capture a son of imprisoned drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman after finding themselves outgunned in a ferocious shootout with cartel henchmen that left at least eight people dead and more than 20 wounded, authorities said Friday.

The gunbattle Thursday paralyzed the capital of Mexico’s Sinaloa state, Culiacan, and left the streets littered with burning vehicles. Residents took cover indoors as automatic gunfire raged outside.

It was the third bloody and terrifying shootout in less than a week between security forces and cartel henchmen, raising questions about whether President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s policy of avoiding the use of force and focusing on social ills is working.

López Obrador defended the decision to back down, saying his predecessors’ strategy “turned this country into a cemetery, and we don’t want that anymore.”

But Mike Vigil, a former chief of international operations for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration who worked undercover in Mexico, called the violence “a massive black eye to the Mexican government” and a “sign that the cartels are more powerful” than it is.

Streets in Culiacan, a city of over 800,000, remained blocked with torched cars Friday morning, schools were closed, and some public offices asked their employees to stay home. Few buses were running.

Teresa Mercado, who had just returned to her native Culiacan on Thursday, said: “This is worse than what I had lived through years ago.”

It's like Don Winslow's books write themselves.

Mexico's bid to detain El Chapo son 'a failure of everything'

Sounds like things went well!

Even to a nation hardened to drug war images, the scenes in Culiacán were shocking.

Scores of cartel gunmen shut down the streets and engaged in sustained battles with the armed forces. Vast patrols of military vehicles descended on the neighbourhood of Tres Rios.

There were burning cars, roadblocks and heavy weaponry being fired in the middle of the day in the centre of the commercial district of the city.

There soon followed equally disturbing images of people - families with children - diving for cover.

"Can we get up now?" one child asked her father as they cowered behind the wheels of their car. "Not yet, darling," he replied, his voice strained and frightened.

I can't believe they just gave up. That is crazy.

Oh yeah, remember how South Korea's Moon Jae-in was riding high in approval when he was talking with North Korea?

It's... uh... dropped a bit.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s approval rating hit a record low after he appointed a scandal-tainted ally as justice minister, adding to woes that include a tepid economy, a trade war with Japan, and North Korea snubbing his overtures for talks.

A regular tracking survey from Gallup Korea released Friday showed Moon’s rating at 40%, a drop from 43% two weeks ago. Respondents cited “personnel appointment issues” as a major reason for what they saw as shortcomings. The disapproval rate for Moon’s government hit a record high of 53%, the poll showed.

Also, here's an interesting sidenote on his presidency:

In a survey carried out by South Korean polling firm Realmeter last month, just 29.4 per cent of men in their 20s said they approved of Moon, compared to 64.5 per cent of women in the same age bracket – an even sharper divide than the much-discussed gender split among Democratic and Republican voters in the United States, where 23 percentage points separates male and female voters.

Moon’s plummeting approval rating among younger men, which stood at 87 per cent soon after the election according to research company Gallup Korea, has been linked to a lacklustre jobs market, slowing economy, and his support for feminism in a country that is undergoing a polarising and sometimes vitriolic debate about gender.

“In the beginning, the intentions might have been pure – advocating for women’s rights – but now it has changed quite a lot,” said Do, a business administration student who believes that South Korea’s feminism movement is mostly “radical” and paints all men as bad.

In the past year, a home-grown #MeToo movement, protests calling for the legalisation of abortion and a crackdown on voyeurs who secretly film women in bathrooms and changing areas have rocked a society whose gender roles are rigidly shaped by patriarchal Confucian values.

South Korea ranked 115 in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2018 – largely because of the gulf in average pay between the sexes and a lack of women in senior business roles. In 2017, nine out of 10 women told rights group Womenlink that they did not feel they were treated as men’s equals.

Yet despite the rampant inequality, feminism remains a dirty word for many – especially men.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s approval rating hit a record low after he appointed a scandal-tainted ally as justice minister, adding to woes that include a tepid economy, a trade war with Japan, and North Korea snubbing his overtures for talks.

Hey, he sounds just like Trump. (except I guess Trumps approval rating is unaffected by such matters)

his support for feminism in a country that is undergoing a polarising and sometimes vitriolic debate about gender.

Oh wait, he does not.

Increasingly, I believe that, rather than simple nationalism, what we are seeing is a resurgence of reactionary traditionalism, across the globe.

Prederick wrote:

Increasingly, I believe that, rather than simple nationalism, what we are seeing is a resurgence of reactionary traditionalism, across the globe.

So does that make it less worrisome (in a very high level sense)? In the same way that Republican actions in the US are getting steadily less palatable as they strive desperately to maintain power in the face of changing desires by the populace, might this be fear by the old guard of what the new generations want in terms of liberal-ness?

Chumpy_McChump wrote:
Prederick wrote:

Increasingly, I believe that, rather than simple nationalism, what we are seeing is a resurgence of reactionary traditionalism, across the globe.

So does that make it less worrisome (in a very high level sense)? In the same way that Republican actions in the US are getting steadily less palatable as they strive desperately to maintain power in the face of changing desires by the populace, might this be fear by the old guard of what the new generations want in terms of liberal-ness?

Depends on whether those minorities can get enough pieces in place to secure their power. Like court packing, gerrymandering and voter supression in the US.

Sure, but I was thinking more motivation than results.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:

So does that make it less worrisome (in a very high level sense)? In the same way that Republican actions in the US are getting steadily less palatable as they strive desperately to maintain power in the face of changing desires by the populace, might this be fear by the old guard of what the new generations want in terms of liberal-ness?

If progress was inevitable, sure, but there can absolutely be massive backslides, or at least, a lot of garbage can happen prior to breaking through.

Meanwhile, Chile gets in on the protest action as well.

Chile's President Sebastián Piñera has suspended a rise in metro fares after two days of violent protests that brought the capital to a standstill.

Soldiers in armoured personnel carriers confronted protesters in Santiago, which is under a state of emergency.

Elsewhere, residents demonstrated by banging pots and honking car horns.

The protests have broadened to reflect general discontent about the high cost of living in one of Latin America's most stable countries.

The unrest, the worst in decades, has exposed divisions in the nation, one of the region's wealthiest but also one of its most unequal, and intensified calls for economic reforms.

Meanwhile, in Barcelona.

Prederick wrote:

Meanwhile, Chile gets in on the protest action as well.

And we have gone sailing right into genuinely violent protests.

Five people have died after a garment factory was set ablaze by looters near Chile's capital Santiago amid a wave of protests.

The military and police used tear gas and water cannon against demonstrators, and a night-time curfew was imposed in major cities.

The unrest, sparked by a now suspended metro fare hike, has widened to reflect anger over living costs and inequality.

President Sebastián Piñera has defended the government's response.

"I'm convinced that democracy not only has the right, it has the obligation to defend itself using all the instruments that democracy itself provides, and the rule of law to combat those who want to destroy it," he said after an emergency meeting with officials.

Protests continued across the country despite a state of emergency in five regions declared by Mr Piñera on Friday, allowing authorities to restrict people's freedom of movement and their right to assembly.

Thousands of soldiers and tanks have been sent to the streets of the capital and other cities for the first time since 1990, when Chile returned to democracy after the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.

You ever hear the one about the married couple that gets a divorce after having an argument over pancakes and the moral is "It wasn't just about the pancakes?" Yeah, replace pancakes with the Chilean equivalent of Metro Passes.

An explosion of protest, a howl of rage – but not a Latin American spring

Tanks on the streets in Chile. Barricades and bloodshed in Bolivia. Weeks of unrest that have pushed Haiti to the brink and forced Ecuador’s president to relocate his government.

“This is a social revolution,” said Andrea Lyn, a 61-year-old actor who took to the streets of Santiago this week. “It is us saying: no more.”

Latin America has been called “the forgotten continent” – but in recent weeks it has hardly been out of the news.

A succession of dramatic – and in several cases unforeseen – social explosions have catapulted the region into the global consciousness and left some asking if a Latin American spring has arrived. A headline in Mexico’s El Universal newspaper this week declared Latin America and the Caribbean “red hot”.

In an enormous and disparate region of 33 countries, more than 630 million people and governments from authoritarian left to far right, there is no single explanation for the political and social tremors currently rattling the region, from Quito to Caracas.

But longtime observers do see some common threads linking many of the convulsions.

Polls just closed in Argentina's election.

Polls have closed in Argentina's presidential election, which pitted conservative incumbent Mauricio Macri against centre-left challenger Alberto Fernández.

The vote was held amid a deep economic crisis that has left a third of the population in poverty.

Early forecasts by local media suggested a win for Mr Fernández.

Official results are not expected to be released until about 21:00 local time (00:00 GMT).

Mr Macri had trailed behind his challenger in pre-election polls and was trounced by the opposition in primary elections in August.

Ahead of the official results, Mr Fernández's Frente de Todos party said it was confident of victory.

"We improved our electoral performance from the primaries at a national and provincial level," a party spokesman said, according to Reuters news agency.

After casting his vote earlier in the day, Mr Macri told reporters it was a "historic election".

EDIT: The Peronists won!

That is insane.

That is really sad.

slazev wrote:

A famous castle in Japan is burning. Notre Dame , part 2.

I am going to say that this won't get the same attention in the West because of White people.

Or because one was in the West and one wasn’t. I don’t see what race has to do with it.

Bolivian President Evo Morales resigns amid fraud poll protests

Bolivian President Evo Morales has resigned amid turmoil following his disputed re-election last month.

On Sunday, international monitors called for the election result to be annulled, saying they had found "clear manipulations" of the 20 October poll.

Mr Morales agreed with the findings and announced his intention to call fresh elections - after overhauling the country's election body.

But politicians - and the army and police chiefs - had urged him to quit.

In a televised address, Mr Morales said he would resign as president, and urged protesters to "stop attacking the brothers and sisters, stop burning and attacking".

Some of his allies were attacked earlier this week, and said their homes had been set alight.

How the U.S. betrayed the Marshall Islands, kindling the next nuclear disaster

Five thousand miles west of Los Angeles and 500 miles north of the equator, on a far-flung spit of white coral sand in the central Pacific, a massive, aging and weathered concrete dome bobs up and down with the tide.

Here in the Marshall Islands, Runit Dome holds more than 3.1 million cubic feet — or 35 Olympic-sized swimming pools — of U.S.-produced radioactive soil and debris, including lethal amounts of plutonium. Nowhere else has the United States saddled another country with so much of its nuclear waste, a product of its Cold War atomic testing program.

Between 1946 and 1958, the United States detonated 67 nuclear bombs on, in and above the Marshall Islands — vaporizing whole islands, carving craters into its shallow lagoons and exiling hundreds of people from their homes.

U.S. authorities later cleaned up contaminated soil on Enewetak Atoll, where the United States not only detonated the bulk of its weapons tests but, as The Times has learned, also conducted a dozen biological weapons tests and dumped 130 tons of soil from an irradiated Nevada testing site. It then deposited the atoll’s most lethal debris and soil into the dome.

Now the concrete coffin, which locals call “the Tomb,” is at risk of collapsing from rising seas and other effects of climate change. Tides are creeping up its sides, advancing higher every year as distant glaciers melt and ocean waters rise.

Officials in the Marshall Islands have lobbied the U.S. government for help, but American officials have declined, saying the dome is on Marshallese land and therefore the responsibility of the Marshallese government.

“I’m like, how can it [the dome] be ours?” Hilda Heine, the president of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, said in an interview in her presidential office in September. “We don’t want it. We didn’t build it. The garbage inside is not ours. It’s theirs.”

To many in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Runit Dome is the most visible manifestation of the United States’ nuclear legacy, a symbol of the sacrifices the Marshallese made for U.S. security, and the broken promises they received in return.