[News] All Around The World

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A posting place for news from places around the globe, outside of the US/Europe.

Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi Dies In Court, State TV SaysYour text to link here...

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s state TV says the country’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi has collapsed during a court session and died.

The state TV says the 67-year-old Morsi was attending a session Monday in his trial on espionage charges when he blacked out and then died. His body was taken to a hospital, it said.

Killary strikes again!

So, some interesting news from Turkey!

It looks like Erdogan's ruling AKP party has lost the Mayoralty of the capital, Istanbul.

Again.

Long and the short of it, Istanbul is an incredibly important city in Turkey (obviously) that Erdogan was once Mayor of. They had a Mayoral election earlier this ear, and the AKP candidate lost by a slim margin, leading the AKP to challenge the result (and bring claims that they were trying to steal the election).

Now, it's looking like they took an even more sound beating the second time around. This won't kill Erodogan or the AKP to be clear, but the AKP have controlled Istanbul since 1994, when I believe Erdogan himself was Mayor. It is, at a minimum, a major embarrassment for Erdogan.

Also, holy hell, how have I not posted about the protests in Hong Kong?

Islamic State captives 'must be tried or freed', says UN's Bachelet

The UN says tens of thousands of Islamic State fighters and family members being held in Iraq and Syria must be tried or released.

Human rights chief Michelle Bachelet also called on countries to take responsibility for their citizens and take them back if not charged.

The last IS strongholds fell in March and some 55,000 people are being held, including thousands of foreigners.

But many nations have shown reluctance to bring their citizens back.

The countries fear prosecutions of IS fighters may be difficult and public opinion is often strongly against repatriation.

Some countries have also refused to recognise the children of IS members born in Syria and Iraq as citizens, despite their parents having nationality.

Ms Bachelet said that children in particular had suffered "grievous violations" of their human rights.

We've discussed this in this thread before, and I'm still a little conflicted about it, honestly. The kids, fine, but the adults?

Gangnam: The scandal rocking the playground of K-pop

Earlier this year, the meticulously managed world of K-pop was rocked by scandal.

Seungri, a singer in one of the world's most famous boy bands, Big Bang, was questioned by police over allegations he was procuring prostitutes for his business and had embezzled funds at Burning Sun, a nightclub he part-owned in the exclusive Gangnam district of Seoul, South Korea.

Several of his celebrity K-pop friends were also caught sharing sex videos and bragging in a chat room about raping women. One by one, Korean heartthrobs more used to being mobbed by fans found themselves fending off reporters as they made their way to the police station to face questions from drug-taking to rape.

But in recent months an even more shocking picture has emerged of Gangnam, where South Korea's high society live, work and play. The BBC has heard allegations that in its glitzy nightclubs, women have been drugged to order by powerful men and raped, and that underage girls are being sexually exploited for profit.

The BBC has sought the voices of those caught up in Seoul's sex scandal. We have heard from club-goers and club employees as well as victims, including underage girls who say they were recruited to have sex with paying customers. They all say the abuse of women in the clubs is pervasive and often violent.

We have been told that elite clients, known as VIPs - and the richest VVIPs - were prepared to pay tens of thousands of dollars to have women who were enjoying a night out drugged and taken to a nearby hotel room, the abuse routinely captured on camera.

As one club-goer put it to us: "These men are hunters and they pay to get in the game. So you need prey. It's foolish to think you won't get shot in this place."

Prederick wrote:

So, some interesting news from Turkey!

It looks like Erdogan's ruling AKP party has lost the Mayoralty of the capital, Istanbul.

Again.

Long and the short of it, Istanbul is an incredibly important city in Turkey (obviously) that Erdogan was once Mayor of.

A former mayor of Istanbul once claimed that whoever controls Istanbul will go on to rule Turkey. That mayor was *checks* Erdogan.

So this means that the AKP rules zero of Turkey’s three largest cities, including the capital.

In my eyes, a first of its kind and an absolutely mind-blowing interview from the Bahrain foreign minister to an Israeli news channel. Keep in mind that the Gulf countries don't have diplomatic relations with Israel. They consistently and blindly support the Palestinians and refuse to move forward with establishing relations with Israel until the Palestinian issue is resolved.
However, things are changing. Those countries see for themselves that the Palestinians keep refusing peace negotiations time after time while practicing terrorism and use the money coming from same Gulf countries to "invest" in terrorism then blame Israel for the poor economy in Gaza.
The Gulf countries have common allies (USA) and common enemies (Iran) so they understand there is very little sense in supporting people who oppose peace, while strengthening relations with Israel is the logical thing to do.

Bahrain foreign minister: Palestinians made a mistake by boycotting peace conference

MANAMA, Bahrain — Bahraini Foreign Minister Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa told me in an exclusive interview for Channel 13 news and Axios that the Palestinians made a mistake not showing up to the U.S.-led conference in Manama, where the Trump administration is launching the economic portion of its peace plan.

Highlights

On why he accepted an interview with an Israeli journalist: "It should have happened a long time ago. Talking with people you differ with is always a step that would lead to easing up any tension. We have always wanted to solve the Arab-Israeli dispute or the Palestinian-Israeli dispute. But we have always missed the communication. We've always talked to the whole people around the world except talking directly to the Israeli public and through their own ... media. ... And we didn't want to miss this opportunity here since we have this workshop."

On normalization with Israel, he added: "Yes, you do have a peace agreement with Egypt. You do have a peace agreement with Jordan, and ... some kind of understandings with the Palestinians. ... But this is not the limit of the scope of where you belong. Israel is a country in the Middle East. Israel is part of this heritage of this whole region historically. So the Jewish people have a place among us. So communication needs to be a prerequisite for solving all the dispute. We should talk."

On the Bahrain conference: Sheikh Khalid said the Bahraini government tried to convince the Palestinians not to boycott the conference. "It is always a mistake to miss an opportunity to achieve peace. … This was an opportunity that we wanted to see them here, but they chose not to come."

On the White House peace plan: Sheikh Khalid said he was not privy to the details of the political part of the plan, but said: "We do trust the U.S. that they will be able to reach an agreement." He added in a message to the Palestinians: "It will not be a good idea to shun the role of the U.S. in the peace process." The foreign minister also said he thinks the Israeli government made a mistake by not responding positively to the Arab Peace Initiative when it was first announced in 2002.

On Iran: "Iran is a major threat to the security and stability of the region. I don’t want to use the word Iran. It’s the Islamic Republic. It's this regime that changed all the dynamics." Sheikh Khalid said that Iran is exacerbating the Arab-Israeli conflict by transferring money and weapons to its proxies in the region, and he stressed that Israel had every right to act militarily against Iranian forces in Syria out of self-defense.

Full Transcript

sonny615 wrote:

On the White House peace plan: Sheikh Khalid said he was not privy to the details of the political part of the plan, but said: "We do trust the U.S. that they will be able to reach an agreement." He added in a message to the Palestinians:

Well there goes that guy's credibility.

Jonman wrote:
sonny615 wrote:

On the White House peace plan: Sheikh Khalid said he was not privy to the details of the political part of the plan, but said: "We do trust the U.S. that they will be able to reach an agreement." He added in a message to the Palestinians:

Well there goes that guy's credibility. :)

for some values of "agreement" i'm sure that's true.

BOLSONAROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, known for his hard-line policies on law and order, began his trip to Japan for the G-20 summit on an embarrassing note after a crewman in an advance party was accused of carrying cocaine in his luggage.

Police arrested the crewman in Seville, Spain, on Tuesday after a Brazilian air force plane made a stopover on its way to Japan. Spanish authorities say the crewman, identified by Brazilian and Spanish media as Sgt. Manoel Silva Rodrigues, was carrying 39 kilos of cocaine — 86 pounds. According to Spanish news outlet ABC, the drug was divided into 37 blocks — and the crewman told Civil Guard agents that he was carrying cheese.

The president followed on a separate jet, which reportedly altered its route after Rodrigues' arrest to avoid Seville and instead stop in Lisbon, Portugal, according to Brazilian news outlet Folha de S. Paulo.

Rodrigues serves as a flight steward who has worked internationally dozens of times, including trips with three different Brazilian presidents, according to Folha. In a note about the arrest, Brazil's air force says that when Bolsonaro returns to Brazil, his plane will not pass through Seville but through Seattle in the U.S.

Responding to the news, Bolsonaro stressed that the cocaine arrest was not related to his personal team. But he tweeted that the incident was "unacceptable" and demanded an investigation and severe punishment.

Credit to the Financial Times for going with the perfect headline on this one.

Also, in an interview with FT Putin called liberalism "obsolete," which I imagine sounded twice as ominous in person.

IMAGE(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/976/cpsprodpb/82D1/production/_107398433_3-sogoafp.jpg)

CNN: The unique reasons why millions in Hong Kong are protesting

(CNN)The images coming out of Hong Kong over the past month have been striking: millions of black-clad protesters marching through the streets and thousands of yellow-hatted demonstrators storming into government headquarters.

These protests have been about stopping a controversial extradition bill from taking effect. In previous years, residents have demonstrated over the right to pick their own leaders. The ultimate aim of all of this unrest, it seems, is to keep Hong Kong culturally and politically distinct from the rest of China. People taking to the streets are doing what they can to preserve the city's unique way of life.

China state media run footage of Hong Kong protests

HONG KONG (AP) — Chinese state media ran footage Tuesday of police in Hong Kong clearing protesters from streets in a break with its silence over several past days of pro-democracy demonstrations.

Beijing has largely sought to downplay the demonstrations that have highlighted doubts about the validity of its “one country, two systems” formula for governing the former British colony. Its coverage of the protests and the publication of a harsh editorial in the official Communist Party newspaper Global Times may indicate it is prepared to take a tougher line against the demonstrators following days of forbearance.

“These violent assailants in their arrogance pay no heed to Hong Kong’s law, no doubt arousing the anger and sadness of all people of the city of Hong Kong,” the editorial said.

Hundreds of protesters swarmed into Hong Kong’s legislature Monday night, defacing portraits of lawmakers and spray-painting pro-democracy slogans in the chamber before vacating it as riot police cleared surrounding streets with tear gas and then moved inside.

The occupation came on the 22nd anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to China.

BOLSONAROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

“It’s a marmalade of madness,” Lobão grumbled of Bolsonaro’s crisis-packed opening act in power which has been plagued by factional struggles, mass protests, claims of mafia ties and corruption involving his family, a cocaine smuggling scandal involving a presidential plane and damaging revelations involving his celebrity justice minister, Sérgio Moro.

Not to mention a series of bizarre gaffes – including sharing a pornographic video with his 3.4 million Twitter followers – that have led some to question whether Bolsonaro will even see out his four-year term.

“Not even Syd Barrett ever had such a bad trip,” Lobão said.

Six months after Bolsonaro took office, Lobão, 61, has emerged as one of the rightwing populist’s most ferocious critics, assailing his administration in a succession of searing media appearances.

And he is not alone in his dismay.

Opinion polls show Bolsonaro’s approval ratings have plunged since his 1 January inauguration with 32% of Brazilians now considering his government bad or awful compared with 11% when he took power.

More than half of Brazil now says it does not trust the president.

“It is the worst start to a presidency since the return of democracy [in 1990],” said Mauro Paulino, the director of Datafolha, one of Brazil’s top pollsters. “A lot would depend on the opponent … but if there was another election today, I don’t think he would be re-elected.”

Notorious for his bellicose, bile-filled rhetoric and contempt for human rights, Bolsonaro has long been a hate figure for Brazil’s left.

But a growing number of conservative voices are also now questioning his presidency.

“His popularity is falling because people feel baffled by the things he is doing and saying,” said Eliane Cantanhêde, a columnist for the conservative Estado de São Paulo newspaper, another of Bolsonaro’s most trenchant critics.

São Paulo congressman Arthur do Val insisted he and his libertarian group, Movimento Brasil Livre, didn’t regret backing Bolsonaro “for a single second”.

He accused hostile lefty journalists of unfairly portraying Brazil’s president as a grouch, an ogre and “a 2019 Hitler who wants to kill homosexuals”.

But what mark would Val give Bolsonaro’s first six months in power?

“Four and a half out of 10,” the politician replied. “It’s bad.”

Val’s primary gripe was the excessive influence of the ideological wing of Bolsonaro’s administration – led by an eccentric US-based polemicist called Olavo de Carvalho – and its obsession with waging irrelevant ideological battles instead of promoting key reforms.

He was also perplexed that control of presidential communications had been entrusted to the president’s “most hot-headed son”, Carlos Bolsonaro, who has launched a succession of social media attacks on perceived enemies in his father’s administration and on Brazil’s right.

The “antics” of such figures risked enabling a leftwing comeback, Val warned.

“If the country ends up with a negative impression of the right and goes back to voting for the left, then I think we’ll be going down a very dangerous path.”

Prederick wrote:
Val’s primary gripe was the excessive influence of the ideological wing of Bolsonaro’s administration – led by an eccentric US-based polemicist called Olavo de Carvalho – and its obsession with waging irrelevant ideological battles instead of promoting key reforms.

He was also perplexed that control of presidential communications had been entrusted to the president’s “most hot-headed son”, Carlos Bolsonaro, who has launched a succession of social media attacks on perceived enemies in his father’s administration and on Brazil’s right.

Gee, that sounds familiar. Where have I seen a leader like that recently?

BOLSONAROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Brazil’s justice minister Sérgio Moro is facing renewed pressure to resign after the country’s leading conservative magazine waded into a snowballing scandal over his role in a mammoth anti-corruption investigation that helped reshape South America’s political landscape.

Brazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, and his supporters have tried to portray the slew of revelations about Moro’s conduct in ‘Operation Car Wash’ as part of a leftwing assault being spearheaded by the investigative website the Intercept and its co-founder Glenn Greenwald.

In early June, the Intercept began publishing a series of exposés based on what it called “a vast trove” of leaked messages between Brazilian law enforcement officials.

But efforts to disqualify the revelations were undermined on Friday when Brazil’s most influential conservative magazine, Veja, published a front-page report featuring damaging new disclosures about Bolsonaro’s most famous minister.

Veja – long a cheerleader for Moro’s anti-corruption crusade – said its journalists had spent a fortnight poring over nearly 650,000 leaked messages between officials involved in the investigation, and concluded the former judge was guilty of serious “irregularities”.

They included claims that – despite being a supposedly impartial judge in the ‘Car Wash’ inquiry – Moro had “illegally” steered prosecutors as they worked to convict Brazilian politicians.

Apropos of nothing, I find Greenwald such a perplexing character, fighting Bolsonaro in Brazil (where he lives) but a regular guest on Tucker Carlson's show here. Go figure.

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