[News] Post a Political News Story

Ongoing discussion of the political news of the day. This thread is for 'smaller' stories that don't call for their own thread. If a story blows up, please start a new thread for it.

Don't count Jones out! He has one move left.

IMAGE(https://manlymanfitness.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/hulk1.jpg)

Get Peter Thiel to finance a move to sue an online news site out of existence?

Cracker Barrel sparks uproar for plant-based sausage critics say is ‘woke’

I repeat, the single greatest okey-doke ever played is these people claiming that it's those "other people" who are Charmin-soft, perpetually triggered snowflakes.

Also, yet another datapoint that "woke" is meaningless. Like they saw their own "Everyone I disagree with a racist" memes and decided to give it a try.

Prederick wrote:

Cracker Barrel sparks uproar for plant-based sausage critics say is ‘woke’

I repeat, the single greatest okey-doke ever played is these people claiming that it's those "other people" who are Charmin-soft, perpetually triggered snowflakes.

Also, yet another datapoint that "woke" is meaningless. Like they saw their own "Everyone I disagree with a racist" memes and decided to give it a try.

Their whole mo is projection; whatever they're accusing their opposition of, they're most certainly doing. They're talking about themselves because they can't conceive others don't think or behave like they do.

weird how it was Cracker Barrel that set them off despite plant-based meats being pretty common in chain restaurants these days. Places like Taco Bell, Red Robin, Dennys, Carl’s jr., etc have been using it for years, and even McDonalds has been rolling it out in select locations.

Burger King has the Impossible Whopper

Prederick wrote:

Cracker Barrel sparks uproar for plant-based sausage critics say is ‘woke’

I repeat, the single greatest okey-doke ever played is these people claiming that it's those "other people" who are Charmin-soft, perpetually triggered snowflakes.

Also, yet another datapoint that "woke" is meaningless. Like they saw their own "Everyone I disagree with a racist" memes and decided to give it a try.

Skimmmmmeerrrrrrrrr.....

ruhk wrote:

weird how it was Cracker Barrel that set them off despite plant-based meats being pretty common in chain restaurants these days. Places like Taco Bell, Red Robin, Dennys, Carl’s jr., etc have been using it for years, and even McDonalds has been rolling it out in select locations.

Yeah, but I would imagine Cracker Barrel was considered a "conservative" brand.

Sinema's on board with the Inflation Reduction Act. It just cost the carried interest tax loophole that enables wealthy hedge fund and investment managers to pay lower taxes.

So when Sinema loses bigly in 2024 you can expect her to land a very cushy job with some hedge fund somewhere.

I serve low cost meals to senior citizens in a rural area at a county run community center and I'm not allowed to accept a free coffee from the family who runs the food truck out here.

Elected officials should have to take a vow of poverty.

GOP governors sent buses of migrants to D.C. — with no plan for what came next

Abbott also announced today that he'd be sending buses directly to NYC. It's a cruel political ploy, toying with people's lives, but, FWIW, It is, unfortunately, also very smart. Cuz so far, NYC and DC have proven largely unequipped to deal with the new arrivals and this immediately puts immense pressure on a "Sanctuary City" to either deal with it or change policy.

This is an especially useful ploy against NYC, which already has a major homelessness problem and whose shelters are already nearly full.

It's f*cked up, but if they don't get federal assistance, it's going to be damn effective.

For months now, the governors of Texas and Arizona have been sending charter buses full of migrants and refugees to Washington, D.C.'s Union Station, just a few blocks from the Capitol building.

When they disembark, they find neither the local nor federal government there to meet them.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says he started sending the buses to D.C. because the Biden administration attempted to lift the pandemic-era emergency Title 42 order that allowed the U.S. to deny migrants entry.

According to Abbott's office, more than 6,100 migrants have been bused to D.C. from Texas alone. They arrive six days a week, as early as 6 a.m. and as late as 11 p.m. — sometimes multiple buses each day.

In response, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser says this is a federal issue that demands a federal answer. She and other local government officials secured a FEMA grant in June for an international nonprofit to offer emergency services to migrants.

So far, only local volunteers and nonprofit staff have greeted these buses at Union Station. Abel Nuñez is head of CARECEN, the Central American Resource Center, which stepped in to help people being bussed to D.C. when this all started.

"It was really crazy because they were just leaving them on the street," said Nuñez, who first showed up at the station on April 16 after getting a tip from the D.C. Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs that a bus was on its way.

"We knew it was on its way so we were there since 5 a.m. just waiting for them along with mutual aid organizations," he said, adding that the first bus didn't arrive till 8 a.m. "And it was incredible how shell-shocked these people were coming out of the buses."

The organization soon learned that the migrants had been let out of immigration detention centers at the border and spent very little time — sometimes less than a day — at a shelter or nonprofit at the border before being put on the bus for a 36-hour journey.

hbi2k wrote:

Elected officials should have to take a vow of poverty.

I fully understand the impulse behind what you're saying.

The flip side of that is you really don't want a talented and passionate public servant to avoid getting into politics because they like the idea of a roof over their head and an occasional hot meal.

If you don't pay enough then the only people that can afford to take a job that doesn't really pay are people who are already rich. The push a few years ago to pay Congressional interns at least $15/hour was about that (along with every industry that offered no or low pay to interns looking to get started).

What needs to happen is that elected officials shouldn't be allowed to trade stocks or make investments based on privileged information they get access to and they should have to wait the better part of a decade after they leave office before they can 'consult' for companies and industries they legislated/regulated or 'lobby' their former coworkers.

They shouldn't be consigned to a life of poverty for their public service, but they also shouldn't be able to profit from it. And I definitely don't want them to feel like they *have* to take bribes because they aren't paid enough.

Final verdict is in for Alex Jones’ Sandy Hook damages trial #1, with punitive damages the grand total comes to about $50 million. A third of what was being asked but it sets an okay precedent for the several other upcoming damages trials, especially since Jones is already declaring that he won the case and is saying that the two parents that sued him are now on his side. Might push future jurors to dig deeper into Jones’ pockets.

It is sad that the plaintiff's lawyer was likely correct, between his regular fans, Rogan and Bitcoiners, he'll make back the initial $4M fine this weekend in donations.

Prederick wrote:

Cuz so far, NYC and DC have proven largely unequipped to deal with the new arrivals and this immediately puts immense pressure on a "Sanctuary City" to either deal with it or change policy.

......................

It's f*cked up, but if they don't get federal assistance, it's going to be damn effective.

Very effective.

The Pentagon rejected a request from the District of Columbia seeking National Guard assistance in what the mayor has called a “growing humanitarian crisis” prompted by thousands of migrants being bused to the city from two southern states.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin declined to provide Guard personnel and the use of the D.C. Armory to assist with the reception of migrants into the city, according to U.S. defense officials. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the district may send an amended, “more specific” request, adding that she believes this is the first time a D.C. request for National Guard has been denied.

One official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a decision not yet made public, said that the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s food and shelter program has provided funding for the problem, and has indicated those funds are sufficient at this point.

Bowser, the district’s Democratic mayor, formally asked the White House last month for an open-ended deployment of 150 National Guard members per day as well as a “suitable federal location” for a mass housing and processing center, mentioning the D.C. Armory as a logical candidate.

During the spring, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, both Republicans, announced plans to send busloads of migrants to Washington, D.C., in response to President Joe Biden’s decision to lift a pandemic-era emergency health order that restricted migrant entry numbers by denying them a chance to seek asylum. The rule remains in effect under court order.

On Friday, Abbott said the first group of migrants from his state had now been bused to New York as well.

As of mid-July, about 5,200 migrants had been bused from Texas to D.C. since April. As of Aug. 3, more than 1,300 had been sent from Arizona since May. The governors call the practice a voluntary free ride — paid for by state taxpayers — that gets migrants closer to family or support networks.

But Bowser last month dismissed that characterization, saying that the asylum-seekers are being “tricked,” as many don’t get close enough to their final destinations and some are ditched at Union Station near the U.S. Capitol and the White House. Often they arrive with no resources and no clue what to do next.

On Friday, Bowser told reporters that the Pentagon appears to be concerned “about the open-ended nature of our request,” and that a more specific one would help.

Use eminent domain to buy housing from speculators at rock bottom prices and give it to the homeless.

Call it the F*ck Robert Moses Plan.

OG_slinger wrote:

4 police officers federally charged with civil rights violation in Breonna Taylor death

NBC News wrote:

Four police officers in Louisville, Kentucky, have been charged with civil rights violations related to the 2020 botched raid in which Breonna Taylor was killed, federal officials said Thursday.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the charges at a press conference Thursday, saying the Justice Department alleges that the offenses the officers are charged with "resulted in Ms. Taylor's death."

Just heard about this. Cases for police officer should be sped up or they shouldn't be allowed to do anything their case is completed.

OG_slinger wrote:

Sinema's on board with the Inflation Reduction Act. It just cost the carried interest tax loophole that enables wealthy hedge fund and investment managers to pay lower taxes.

So when Sinema loses bigly in 2024 you can expect her to land a very cushy job with some hedge fund somewhere.

She’s so nakedly corrupt. Lmao

Mixolyde wrote:

Use eminent domain to buy housing from speculators Texas at rock bottom prices and give it to the homeless.

H.P. Lovesauce wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

Use eminent domain to buy housing from speculators Texas at rock bottom prices and give it to the homeless.

That's a cruel way to punish them. They deserve a working electric grid.

They could probably figure out how to get it working better than Texas leadership...
Just sayin'

*sigh*

The sheriff of a North Carolina mountain county said he will stock all public schools with AR-15 rifles this year so deputies have quick access to a more high-powered firearm in case of a mass shooter.

“Every day you turn on the TV and somebody’s been shot, somebody’s been stabbed, somebody’s been murdered, raped,” Madison County Sheriff Buddy Harwell said when he announced the initiative in a five-minute Facebook video in June.

“We live in Western North Carolina, a rural county, but we’ve got to be prepared even in our rural counties for the enemy when he tries to come in and destroy our children.”


Population of Marshall County NC as of 2020: 757

Size of Marshall County: 4.2 sq miles

Schools in Marshall County: 7

Number of Sherriff's Departments in Marshall NC: 2

Demographics:
White (non-Hispanic)- 698 (89.83%)
Native American- 8 (1.03%)
Asian- 3 (0.39%)
Other/Mixed 30 (3.86%)
Hispanic or Latino- 38 (4.89%)

90% white does make it more likely since about 98% of mass shooters are white males, I guess.

Either those guns need to be locked up tight so everyone will be able to know where they are but cannot easily use them or if they are ready for use then easier for a student to get and use.

What could go wrong?

As if keys are impossible to steal or copy. F*ck this country.

IMAGE(https://th.bing.com/th/id/R.24861f84602929c3fedad64594d3a0b5?rik=9yXkhsOxnXjeOw&riu=http%3a%2f%2fcdn.themis-media.com%2fmedia%2fglobal%2fimages%2flibrary%2fderiv%2f1403%2f1403444.gif&ehk=vTrisCeK%2fdCBeO3YSKsQ1fUKTYVU%2fEG8bx2qSxq%2fvvA%3d&risl=&pid=ImgRaw&r=0&PC=EMMX01)

Well and I guess there is zero percent chance those AR-15s will cause more collateral damage/casualties...
And cops are taught to empty their clips too!

The Atlantic just published a deep dive on the Trump administration's Zero Tolerance policy, how it came about, and its consequences. It's a long read, but very worth it.

The Secret History of Family Separation

The Atlantic wrote:

As a therapist for children who are being processed through the American immigration system, Cynthia Quintana has a routine that she repeats each time she meets a new patient in her office in Grand Rapids, Michigan: She calls the parents or closest relatives to let them know the child is safe and well cared for, and provides 24-hour contact information.

This process usually plays out within hours of when the children arrive. Most are teens who have memorized or written down their relatives’ phone numbers in notebooks they carried with them across the border. By the time of that initial call, their families are typically worried, waiting anxiously for news after having—in an act of desperation—sent their children into another country alone in pursuit of safety and the hope of a future.

But in the summer of 2017, Quintana encountered a curious case. A 3-year-old Guatemalan boy with a toothy smile and bowl-cut black hair sat down at her desk. He was far too little to have made the journey on his own. He had no phone numbers with him, and when she asked where he was headed or whom he’d been with, the boy stared back blankly. Quintana scoured his file for more information but found nothing. She asked for help from an Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer, who came back several days later with something unusual: information indicating that the boy’s father was in federal custody.

At their next session, the boy squirmed in his chair as Quintana dialed the detention center, getting his father on the line. At first the dad was quiet, she told me. “Finally we said, ‘Your child is here. He can hear you. You can speak now.’ And you could just tell that his voice was breaking—he couldn’t.”

The boy cried out for his father. Suddenly, both of them were screaming and sobbing so loudly that several of Quintana’s colleagues ran to her office.

Eventually, the man calmed down enough to address Quintana directly. “I’m so sorry, who are you? Where is my child? They came in the middle of the night and took him,” he said. “What do I tell his mother?”

That same summer, Quintana was also assigned to work with a 3-year-old Honduran girl who gave no indication of how she’d gotten to the United States or where she was supposed to be going. During their first several sessions, the girl refused to speak at all. The muscles on her face were slack and expressionless. Quintana surmised that the girl had severe detachment disorder, often the result of a sudden and recent trauma.

Across her organization—Bethany Christian Services, one of several companies contracted by the American government to care for newly arrived immigrant children—Quintana’s colleagues were having similar experiences. Jennifer Leon, a teacher at Bethany, was at the office one day when the private company that transports children from the border delivered a baby girl “like an Amazon package.” The baby was wearing a dirty diaper; her face was crusted with mucus. “They gave the baby to the case manager with a diaper bag, we signed, that was it,” Leon recalled. (Leon rushed the baby to the hospital for an evaluation.)

Mateo Salazar, a Bethany therapist, went to his office in the middle of the night to meet a newly arrived 5-year-old Honduran girl. At first, the girl was stoic, but when the transportation-company employees started to leave, the girl ran after them, banging on the glass doors and crying as she fell to the ground. Salazar sat with her for two hours until she was calm enough to explain that her mother had made her promise—as Border Patrol agents were pulling them apart—to stay with the adults who took her no matter what, because they would keep her safe.

For more than a year, Quintana and her colleagues encountered cases like this repeatedly. To track down the parents of children in their care, they would scour American prisons and immigration detention centers, using clues from social media or tips from friends inside the government. They would struggle to explain to parents why their kids had been taken away or how to get them back. The therapists, teachers, and caseworkers would try to maintain their composure at work, but they would later break down in their cars and in front of their families. Many debated quitting their job. Though they were experts in caring for severely traumatized children, this was a challenge to which they did not know how to respond.

“I started questioning myself,” Quintana said. “Am I doing the correct thing by serving these kids, or am I contributing to the harm that’s being done?”

“It just seemed unreal to me,” she said of the moment she understood that these were not one-off cases. “Something that was not humane.”

during the year and a half in which the U.S. government separated thousands of children from their parents, the Trump administration’s explanations for what was happening were deeply confusing, and on many occasions—it was clear even then—patently untrue. I’m one of the many reporters who covered this story in real time. Despite the flurry of work that we produced to fill the void of information, we knew that the full truth about how our government had reached this point still eluded us.

Trump-administration officials insisted for a whole year that family separations weren’t happening. Finally, in the spring of 2018, they announced the implementation of a separation policy with great fanfare—as if one had not already been under way for months. Then they declared that separating families was not the goal of the policy, but an unfortunate result of prosecuting parents who crossed the border illegally with their children. Yet a mountain of evidence shows that this is explicitly false: Separating children was not just a side effect, but the intent. Instead of working to reunify families after parents were prosecuted, officials worked to keep them apart for longer.

Over the past year and a half, I have conducted more than 150 interviews and reviewed thousands of pages of internal government documents, some of which were turned over to me only after a multiyear lawsuit. These records show that as officials were developing the policy that would ultimately tear thousands of families apart, they minimized its implications so as to obscure what they were doing. Many of these officials now insist that there had been no way to foresee all that would go wrong. But this is not true. The policy’s worst outcomes were all anticipated, and repeated internal and external warnings were ignored. Indeed, the records show that almost no logistical planning took place before the policy was initiated.

It’s been said of other Trump-era projects that the administration’s incompetence mitigated its malevolence; here, the opposite happened. A flagrant failure to prepare meant that courts, detention centers, and children’s shelters became dangerously overwhelmed; that parents and children were lost to each other, sometimes many states apart; that four years later, some families are still separated—and that even many of those who have been reunited have suffered irreparable harm.

It is easy to pin culpability for family separations on the anti-immigration officials for which the Trump administration is known. But these separations were also endorsed and enabled by dozens of members of the government’s middle and upper management: Cabinet secretaries, commissioners, chiefs, and deputies who, for various reasons, didn’t voice concern even when they should have seen catastrophe looming; who trusted “the system” to stop the worst from happening; who reasoned that it would not be strategic to speak up in an administration where being labeled a RINO or a “squish”—nicknames for those deemed insufficiently conservative—could end their career; who assumed that someone else, in some other department, must be on top of the problem; who were so many layers of abstraction away from the reality of screaming children being pulled out of their parent’s arms that they could hide from the human consequences of what they were doing.

Congress, too, deserves blame, because it failed for decades to fill a legislative vacuum that anti-immigration officials moved to exploit. For too long, an overworked and underequipped border-police force has been left to determine crucial social, economic, and humanitarian policy. It should be no surprise that this police force reached for the most ready tool at its disposal: harsher punishments.

What happened in the months that led up to the implementation of Zero Tolerance—the Trump administration’s initiative that separated thousands of families—should be studied by future generations of organizational psychologists and moral philosophers. It raises questions that have resonance far beyond this one policy: What happens when personal ambition and moral qualm clash in the gray anonymity of a bureaucracy? When rationalizations become denial or outright delusion? When one’s understanding of the line between right and wrong gets overridden by a boss’s screaming insistence?

In reporting this story, I talked with scores of Trump-administration officials whose work was in some way connected to the policy. Very few were willing to speak on the record, for fear that it would affect their employment prospects. A number of them told me they were particularly nervous because they had children to think about and college tuitions to pay. During interviews, they asked to call me back so that they could run and pick their children up from school; they sat their children down in front of homework or toys so that we could speak privately in their homes. “Can you hold on? My daughter is about to get in her car to leave and I need to kiss her goodbye,” one government official said as she was in the middle of describing a spreadsheet of hundreds of complaints from parents searching for their children. I listened as the mother and daughter said “I love you” back and forth to each other at least five times before the official returned and our conversation continued.

Recently, I called Nazario Jacinto-Carrillo, a 36-year-old farmer from the western highlands of Guatemala whom I first wrote about in 2018. Back then, with his field barren and the price of crops stagnant, his family had been straining to survive on the $4 a week he brought home during harvest season. Most days, he and his wife went hungry; some days, his two young children did too. They were destitute and felt unsafe in their community. So that spring, he and his 5-year-old daughter, Filomena, set off for the United States. A “coyote” guided them to the American border near San Diego. All they had to do was walk across.

Things didn’t go as planned. As six Border Patrol agents surrounded them, Filomena grabbed onto one of Nazario’s legs, as did another girl her age with whom they were traveling. The girls screamed as the agents pulled the three apart, one of them holding Nazario by the neck. Nazario eventually agreed to be deported back to Guatemala because, he said, a federal agent told him that if he did so, Filomena would be returned to him within two weeks. This false promise was made to many separated parents, who were later portrayed by the administration as having heartlessly chosen to leave their children alone in the United States. “I would never abandon my daughter,” Nazario told me when we first spoke. More than a month had passed since Nazario’s deportation, and Filomena still wasn’t home.

Nazario’s voice cracked as he interrupted my questions with his own. When will Filomena be returned to Guatemala? How many weeks? What number of days? When is the United States government going to give back the children it kidnapped? What does it want with them? They’re children.

It would take nearly three months, a team of lawyers, the sustained attention of journalists, and a federal court order for Filomena to be reunited with her family. By then she was 6; she’d celebrated a birthday in U.S. government custody.

When I called Nazario again recently, his children were still hungry and his family still felt unsafe. I told him that four years later, some parents still don’t have their children back. “I honestly don’t know what to say,” he said. When I asked him if Filomena, now 9 years old, thinks back on what she experienced in the U.S., he handed her the phone so she could answer herself. She eked out a few words that I couldn’t understand and then went silent and handed the phone back to her father.

“Sorry,” he told me. “She’s crying.”

JC wrote:

*sigh*

The sheriff of a North Carolina mountain county said he will stock all public schools with AR-15 rifles this year so deputies have quick access to a more high-powered firearm in case of a mass shooter.

“Every day you turn on the TV and somebody’s been shot, somebody’s been stabbed, somebody’s been murdered, raped,” Madison County Sheriff Buddy Harwell said when he announced the initiative in a five-minute Facebook video in June.

“We live in Western North Carolina, a rural county, but we’ve got to be prepared even in our rural counties for the enemy when he tries to come in and destroy our children.”


Population of Marshall County NC as of 2020: 757

Size of Marshall County: 4.2 sq miles

Schools in Marshall County: 7

Number of Sherriff's Departments in Marshall NC: 2

Demographics:
White (non-Hispanic)- 698 (89.83%)
Native American- 8 (1.03%)
Asian- 3 (0.39%)
Other/Mixed 30 (3.86%)
Hispanic or Latino- 38 (4.89%)

My son's high school had a weapons locker in the main office. I think only the school resource officer had access and it was (at least) a combination lock. I was talking about it with one of the administrators. He mentioned that it was a parental demand and just rolled his eyes when I mentioned that it didn't look overly usable. So yeah, it is basically a very expensive placebo.

JC wrote:

*sigh*

The sheriff of a North Carolina mountain county said he will stock all public schools with AR-15 rifles this year so deputies have quick access to a more high-powered firearm in case of a mass shooter.

“Every day you turn on the TV and somebody’s been shot, somebody’s been stabbed, somebody’s been murdered, raped,” Madison County Sheriff Buddy Harwell said when he announced the initiative in a five-minute Facebook video in June.

“We live in Western North Carolina, a rural county, but we’ve got to be prepared even in our rural counties for the enemy when he tries to come in and destroy our children.”


Population of Marshall County NC as of 2020: 757

Size of Marshall County: 4.2 sq miles

Schools in Marshall County: 7

Number of Sherriff's Departments in Marshall NC: 2

Demographics:
White (non-Hispanic)- 698 (89.83%)
Native American- 8 (1.03%)
Asian- 3 (0.39%)
Other/Mixed 30 (3.86%)
Hispanic or Latino- 38 (4.89%)

This is the neghboring county to mine, and it's actually Madison county, Marshall is the county seat. The county population is around 22k and is considered part of Metro Asheville, though just barely. The county is a mix between true Appalachian hollers and boutique organic animal farms (alpaca, highland coo, emu.)

None of which changes the fact that it's a bat sh*t idea, but just another in a long line of bad ideas that does nothing to actually help.