[News] Post a Political News Story

Ongoing discussion of the political news of the day. This thread is for 'smaller' stories that don't call for their own thread. If a story blows up, please start a new thread for it.

About time.

(CNN)Twitter has permanently suspended Georgia GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's Twitter account @mtgreenee, the company confirmed to CNN Sunday morning.

A Twitter spokesperson said the company "permanently suspended" the account "for repeated violations of our COVID-19 misinformation policy."

Greene most frequently tweeted from the handle @mtgreenee. She still has access to and can tweet from her official congressional account @RepMTG.

Rep. Greene released a statement after the ban, part of which said: "Social media platforms can't stop the truth from being spread far and wide. Big Tech can't stop the truth. Communist Democrats can't stop the truth. I stand with the truth and the people. We will overcome!"

Now do Boebert.

And Gosar.

Jewish Space Laser: 1
Marjorie Taylor Greene: 0

The ban is for her personal account. She still has her official Congressional account.

Devin Nunes has resigned from congress.

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) formally resigned from Congress on Monday, as the California Republican departs to run former President Trump's new media and technology company.

Nunes’s resignation letter was read aloud on the House floor during a pro forma session on Monday. It is set to take effect at 11:59 p.m. today.

Can't wait to see the new company crash and burn.

Related question - do voters give a sh*t when the person they elected to a post gives up on that post for a $$$ job?

His voters? No, of course not. And I don't think it will matter much since redistricting supposedly will make it harder for him to hold his seat.

Let the whining comence - just a witch hunt, politically motivated, etc.

farley3k wrote:

Let the whining comence - just a witch hunt, politically motivated, etc.

Ain't nothing gonna happen, call me when they go to jail, etc.

Mixolyde wrote:
farley3k wrote:

Let the whining comence - just a witch hunt, politically motivated, etc.

Ain't nothing gonna happen, call me when they go to jail, etc.

So we don’t need to get your number, then?

Probably related

Eldest Trump children won't comply with subpoenas from New York attorney general

So Trump cancelled his planned press conference to what I can only imagine was to 'celebrate' the one year anniversary of the insurrection. It's hard to tell if he cancelled it because--as some Trump insiders said--he found out it wasn't going to be covered live by the news media or because the House January 6th Commission asked his dear friend Sean Hannity why in the f*ck he sent dozens of super sus text messages to him, Mark Meadows (Trump's CoS), and multiple members of the White House Counsel's Office right before, during, and after the insurrection. Texts that show Hannity wasn't acting as a journalist, but as an unofficial advisor to Trump.

Either way we're a year into this mess and fourteen months into the Big Lie. And speaking of the Big Lie an ABC/Ipsos poll from last week found that 71% of Republicans still believe that Biden is an illegitimate president because Trump really won last year.. I believe that's several points higher than what it was right after the election.

And that's even with every review and audit of the election showing there wasn't any voter fraud or shenanigans. Hell Texas just completed the first part of the election audit Trump wanted and found, well, nothing in the four million votes it reviewed.

If you hadn't heard about that it's no wonder. Texas released the results of the audit in the ultimate Friday news dump: late on New Year's Eve.

I don't know what's going to happen with all of this. My greatest fear is nothing. No repercussions for the traitors among us and a Republican party full of angry idiots who proudly reject all the evidence before us and believe in a lie.

OG_slinger wrote:

So Trump cancelled his planned press conference to what I can only imagine was to 'celebrate' the one year anniversary of the insurrection. It's hard to tell if he cancelled it because--as some Trump insiders said--he found out it wasn't going to be covered live by the news media or because the House January 6th Commission asked his dear friend Sean Hannity why in the f*ck he sent dozens of super sus text messages to him, Mark Meadows (Trump's CoS), and multiple members of the White House Counsel's Office right before, during, and after the insurrection. Texts that show Hannity wasn't acting as a journalist, but as an unofficial advisor to Trump.

Either way we're a year into this mess and fourteen months into the Big Lie. And speaking of the Big Lie an ABC/Ipsos poll from last week found that 71% of Republicans still believe that Biden is an illegitimate president because Trump really won last year.. I believe that's several points higher than what it was right after the election.

And that's even with every review and audit of the election showing there wasn't any voter fraud or shenanigans. Hell Texas just completed the first part of the election audit Trump wanted and found, well, nothing in the four million votes it reviewed.

If you hadn't heard about that it's no wonder. Texas released the results of the audit in the ultimate Friday news dump: late on New Year's Eve.

I don't know what's going to happen with all of this. My greatest fear is nothing. No repercussions for the traitors among us and a Republican party full of angry idiots who proudly reject all the evidence before us and believe in a lie.

Don't look up man. We won't feel the hurt until the comet hits.

And we could be rich. How awful!

OG_slinger wrote:

I don't know what's going to happen with all of this. My greatest fear is nothing. No repercussions for the traitors among us and a Republican party full of angry idiots who proudly reject all the evidence before us and believe in a lie.

I fear you are right. But I don't know how to stop it. When proof, logic, facts, evidence etc. don't sway them what can be done?

Interesting interview in today's Boston Globe.

Bottom line:

Q. So voting is not enough?

In terms of the citizenry, we really have to engage in disruptive, narratively speaking, disruptive, economically speaking, disruptive, politically speaking — warfare. It’s more than just voting. We literally have to stop business from being done the way it has been done. We have done all we can do coloring within the lines.

Emphasis mine, but the premise is that we are at war and need to realize that and act accordingly.

farley3k wrote:

I fear you are right. But I don't know how to stop it. When proof, logic, facts, evidence etc. don't sway them what can be done?

Honestly? I increasingly don't see a future that doesn't include widespread political violence.

If Dems continue to win it'll be the racist, gun-owning hicks who misquote the Declaration and Constitution who will brazenly murder people who they feel are undermining the power of White Christian men (i.e., everyone who's not a White Christian man). They'll be militias and lone wolves who the right will claim doesn't represent them, but who a lot of them openly encourage and support.

If Republicans win then our little governmental experiment is dead and the country will have to physically wrest power from their grubby little hands. They know the numbers and know they can't legitimately hold political power outside of backwater square states with virtually all White populations. And because they're in power Republicans will use every state tool at their disposal to stay there which will make the protests of Summer 2020 look like block parties.

^^ Saying "we're at war, y'all!" feels good, but it's not particularly actionable, unless you mean it in the literal sense and are advocating physical violence. Here's a more complete quote including more specific actions that the interviewee-- Harvard's Cornell William Brooks-- recommends.

A. Here’s how we get out of it. Commendably, [radio talk show host known as the Black Eagle] Joe Madison is engaged, for example, in a principled, morally driven hunger strike against voter suppression, as are the young people from Arizona [universities]. They’re also engaged in a kind of guerrilla warfare. They’re upending the script, they’re creating disruption. If that kind of thing grows, it’s like the civil rights movement before [nonviolent, direct-action] strategy became conventional. We saw this with the George Floyd protests, just in terms of the sheer size, and number, and diversity, and the disruption to daily life.

Q. So voting is not enough?

In terms of the citizenry, we really have to engage in disruptive, narratively speaking, disruptive, economically speaking, disruptive, politically speaking — warfare. It’s more than just voting. We literally have to stop business from being done the way it has been done. We have done all we can do coloring within the lines.

Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, the abolitionists of old, couldn’t vote their way to freedom. They had to do a lot more than that. That’s what I’m saying: We’ve got to do a lot more than that.

I'm curious what specifically he means by "a kind of guerilla warfare." The interview does not go into further detail on that point.

OG_slinger wrote:

I don't know what's going to happen with all of this. My greatest fear is nothing. No repercussions for the traitors among us and a Republican party full of angry idiots who proudly reject all the evidence before us and believe in a lie.

See, you DO know what's going to happen, though you seem to have missed out the bit where it's "the same, but on steroids".

The playbook has been validated, and is now the dominant strategy going forward.

I'm 100% expecting an American version of The Troubles.

I don't see many scenarios where the US doesn't continue to accelerate its direction toward being the textbook definition of a Third World sh*thole.

Yes, I am looking at exit strategies.

hbi2k wrote:

^^ Saying "we're at war, y'all!" feels good, but it's not particularly actionable, unless you mean it in the literal sense and are advocating physical violence.

It doesn't feel good. It's feels terrible and hopeless.

I'm not advocating violence. I just don't see a path forward where conservatives are going to willingly and peacefully hand over the power they currently hold, but have not earned.

It would be a really weird read of American history to think that we're going to get through this without violence.

We're literally a country whose founding act was to violently wrest power from King George. Then we did it again to ourselves to prevent Southern states from taking their power elsewhere. And a close read of the Civil Rights Movement will show that sh*t got done not because of peaceful protests, but because of the political and social threat those protests represented (not that those protests, like 2020's, were considered peaceful at the time).

And then there was 1/6 which was very much a not-so surprise attack on our democracy by red hat shock troops who'd spent the previous five years mainlining hate and conservative lies.

These are the people who cheered Trump's tough talk, who said "f*ck your feelings," who remain entirely OK with nearly a million COVID deaths just as long as they can eat at Applebees. They aren't going to care about hunger strikes or the moral high ground.

I know any attempt to get Democratic voices heard and Democratic votes counted will be branded by the right as political violence. The Summer of 2020 (as well as 1964 to 1969) made that perfectly clear.

And the right will cheer and celebrate the (conservative controlled) State violently putting down any protest or civil disobedience. And, thanks to Rittenhouse, there will be many who will happily join in on their own. That's because they already think they're at war. Hell that ABC/Ipsos poll found that a majority of Republicans view the violence of 1/6 as them valiantly defending democracy, not the other way around.

Paleocon wrote:

I don't see many scenarios where the US doesn't continue to accelerate its direction toward being the textbook definition of a Third World sh*thole.

Yes, I am looking at exit strategies.

The problem is that the U.S. isn't the only place where authoritarianism is rising. And countries with stable democracies are all smaller, and heavily influenced by the U.S.

Finally, how many aging X'ers is New Zealand going to allow in?

New Zealand needs to take a page from China's book and start creating islands off its coast.

EDIT: nvm

I've officially wanted to US-Exit since... hell, I'm not sure. Sometime in the mid '10's. After last January, that changed from "I officially want out" to "f*ck, get me the hell out of here". Sadly, between my age, my career not really being easily transferable (health care EMR support), my wife's custody agreement for our daughter (technically my stepdaughter, but dad's basically a non-existent deadbeat), and general reluctance on the part of my wife to consider leaving the US even once our daughter is of age unless things are so bad that we'll be effectively stuck here anyway... I'm pretty much riding this sh*t out one way or another.

I do find myself often wishing I'd taken a different course in my life starting back in college for quite a variety of reasons, but... eh, I made my bed, now I'm stuck with it.

Farscry - I feel the same. I tell my kids, when they talk about future plans, to think about leaving the US if they have any desire and I would leave in a heartbeat if I could.

Portugal. My wife and I are looking at Portugal. Of course we can't retire for 15 years, but we're starting to lay down the groundwork now.

When I moved here in 2007, I had an attitude of "oh well, if this doesn't work out, I've still got my British passport so I can go anywhere in Europe."

Yeah.....ummm.....

At this point, it's a question of which country is least on fire.

Well I’m two hours drive from the Canadian border and there are plenty of poorly watched crossing points if things get bad enough. At least I’ll get my family to safety - since I’m former military I’d feel honor-bound to stick it out.