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How Republican States Are Expanding Their Power Over Elections

@zittrain wrote:

Some extraordinary quotes in this piece. It’s hard not to conclude from it that many Republican officials believe that only Republicans can be trusted to administer elections, and only Republicans can legitimately win them. (Any Rs who do certify a D victory are also purged.)

Or, as Adam Serwer accurately put it:

The Michigan protester’s declaration that Trump won the election (by a landslide, no less) falls into the same category. The majority of people who make such declarations understand that in fact, Trump did not win, that he received fewer votes than his opponent, and that the Electoral College result reflects that loss. But they support Trump’s claims that the vote was fraudulent, and his efforts to pressure Republican officials in key states to overturn the result. To Trump’s strongest supporters, Biden’s win is a fraud because his voters should not count to begin with, and because the Democratic Party is not a legitimate political institution that should be allowed to wield power even if they did.

This is why the authoritarian remedies festering in the Trump fever swamps—martial law, the usurpation of state electors, Supreme Court fiat—are so openly contemplated. Because the true will of the people is that Trump remain president, forcing that outcome, even in the face of defeat, is a fulfillment of democracy rather than its betrayal.

The Republican base’s fundamental belief, the one that Trump used to win them over in the first place, the one that ties the election conspiracy theory to birtherism and to Trump’s sneering attack on the Squad’s citizenship, is that Democratic victories do not count, because Democratic voters are not truly American. It’s no accident that the Trump campaign’s claims have focused almost entirely on jurisdictions with high Black populations.

..........

According to a 2020 survey by the political scientist Larry Bartels, three-quarters of Republican voters believe that “it is hard to trust the results of elections when so many people will vote for anyone who offers a handout.” Because Republicans believe, as Mitt Romney put it after his defeat in 2012, that Black people vote for Democrats only because they are offered “free stuff,” Black votes are considered illegitimate even if they are legally cast. Those votes could be legitimate if more of them were cast for Republicans, the party of true Americans, but as long as they are cast for Democrats, they can be dismissed as the result of Democratic brainwashing. Demanding that Black votes be tossed out is not antidemocratic, because they should not have counted in the first place.

..........

When they say the 2020 election was stolen, Trumpists are expressing their view that the votes of rival constituencies should not count, even though they understand, on some level, that they do. They are declaring that the nation belongs to them and them alone, whether or not they actually comprise a majority, because they are the only real Americans to begin with.

Progressive policies like pot legalization and Medicaid expansion became law through ballot initiatives. Now some Republican-led states are working to limit that process.

The most damning example is probably Mississippi, where the overwhelming voter led legalization of marijuana was overturned by six assholes in black robes because of some literal hand waving.

Yeah and Florida passed a ballot to let ex-felons vote. They've paid their debt to society after all. But then the GOP got involved and made up a poll tax to keep them from voting.

Looks like the organization that sheltered child molesters and funneled nazi war criminals to Argentina wants to preach to Biden about abortion.

It'll be interesting how this US bishop thing plays out. They have direct orders from the Pope but are pushing ahead with their political agenda. So what happens if the Pope defrocks them, ex-communicates them, or whatever?

Paleocon wrote:

Looks like the organization that sheltered child molesters and funneled nazi war criminals to Argentina wants to preach to Biden about abortion.

Just reinforces why we left the church and why our girls aren't being raised catholic.

SallyNasty wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Looks like the organization that sheltered child molesters and funneled nazi war criminals to Argentina wants to preach to Biden about abortion.

Just reinforces why we left the church and why our girls aren't being raised catholic.

Oh, Catholics. I was wondering which one we were talking about.

The Bishop’s vote was about 3/4 for the proposal, and 1/4 against. In order to turn the resolution into policy, they have to have *unanimous* consent, OR 2/3 plus the explicit support of the Pope.

The Pope has come out against this, so there’s no way this will become American Church policy. What they will do is to put out a handwringing statement urging Church leaders to “think deeply about the issue”. That will happen this Fall.

What I would like a journalist to ask the bishops voting for this is why there’s not a similar vote for elected officials that support the death penalty.

Clumber wrote:

What I would like a journalist to ask the bishops voting for this is why there’s not a similar vote for elected officials that support the death penalty.

I actually think that the Catholic Church has done a pretty good job standing against the Death Penalty.

Yes, Nathaniel, they are consistent in that. But they don't take Republican politicians to task for it that I have (ever) seen. Counter-evidence is welcome, I have not studied this.

Hypocrites is about the nicest word you can use to describe them.

As someone I read pointed out - they are a "pro birth" party not a "pro life" party. They want lots of live births but they don't give two sh*ts what happens after that.

It's gonna get real interesting when the white supremacist/replacement theory crowd of the GOP starts telling the anti-abortion crowd that some abortions would be OK and are actually needed for the future of America. For quite a few anti-abortionists that call is going to be coming from inside their house,

"The only moral abortion is my Hispanic housekeeper's...no reason."

Its not even pro-birth. Its not even pro anything. They pressure you to give birth and suffer whatever the consequences are. There is no support for the mother at any stage other than lip service. It is evil of the worst kind since this "sage advice" is zealous and under the guise of valuing life and high morals.

It isn't about fetuses. It's about punishing sluts.

I mean, that's my kink too, but there's a way to do it that involves a safe word and aftercare and not, y'know, communion and/or public health policy.

hbi2k wrote:

I mean, that's my kink too, but there's a way to do it that involves a safe word and aftercare and not, y'know, communion and/or public health policy.

Are you me?

The safeword is in Latin and the aftercare is a cracker and some wine-adjacent beverage.

Mixolyde wrote:

"The only moral abortion is my Hispanic housekeeper's...no reason."

Whoa, calm down Mr. Schwarzenegger.

Partisan war over teaching history and racism stokes tensions in U.S. schools

The school board of Virginia's wealthy Loudoun County had planned to hold a routine meeting to close out the school year. Instead, it was pandemonium.

Many of the hundreds of parents who flooded the auditorium in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., on Tuesday night were there to accuse the schools of teaching their kids that racism in America is structural and systemic - which the board denies. Some signs read, "Education not indoctrination" and "You don't end racism by teaching it."

The evening grew so heated that the board walked out of the room, leaving sheriff's deputies to disperse the crowd.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Wayde Byard, the Loudoun County Public Schools spokesman for more than two decades, after deputies took two attendees out of the room in handcuffs.

Loudoun has been roiled for months by accusations that it has embraced critical race theory, a school of thought that maintains that racism is ingrained in U.S. law and institutions and that legacies of slavery and segregation have created an uneven playing field for Black Americans.

The school system says it is simply training teachers, the majority of whom are white, to be “culturally responsive" to serve the county's increasingly diverse student population.

The tensions in Loudoun echo a larger battle playing out across the country. As Americans tackle racial and social injustice in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd last year, several Republican-led states including Florida, Georgia and Texas have enacted new rules to limit teaching about the role of racism in the United States.

I posted it the white supremacy thread but maybe it goes better here based on the article above

Well this video clip on CNN is well worth watching - go old white guy!

General's response to Gaetz's question leaves him shaking his head

Some good news

States across the country are dropping barriers to voting, widening a stark geographic divide in ballot access

More than half of U.S. states have lowered some barriers to voting since the 2020 election, making permanent practices that helped produce record voter turnout during the coronavirus pandemic — a striking countertrend to the passage of new restrictions in key Republican-controlled states this year.

The newly enacted laws in states from Vermont to California expand access to the voting process on a number of fronts, such as offering more early and mail voting options, protecting mail ballots from being improperly rejected and making it easier to register to vote.

Some states restored voting rights to people with past felony convictions or expanded options for voters with disabilities, both long-standing priorities among advocates. And in Virginia, a new law requires localities to receive preapproval or feedback on voting changes as a shield against racial discrimination, a first for states after the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the federal Voting Rights Act in 2013.

The push to make voting easier around the country comes even as Republicans have embraced voting restrictions in GOP-controlled states such as Georgia, Florida and Iowa. Some states have passed laws that make some elements of voting easier and others harder, leading to mixed effects.

But the overall result is a deepening divide in ballot access depending on where voters live — one shaped by how lawmakers have reacted to both the pandemic and former president Donald Trump’s false claims that the 2020 election was tainted by massive fraud.

“There’s a fault line that’s developing between states working to strengthen our democracy and states actively restricting it,” said Liz Avore, vice president for law and policy with the nonpartisan Voting Rights Lab, which tracks developments in state election law and analyzed this year’s legislative action in a report last week. “It is stark when you look at the map … That division is really remarkable.”

The trend is not limited to blue states, though they have led the charge. Indiana and Kentucky made several significant changes this year, including expanding the availability of ballot drop-off locations and establishing processes for voters to correct certain errors that would otherwise invalidate their mail ballots. At least four red states created systems for voters to track their ballots through the mail. Louisiana eliminated hurdles for people with past felony convictions as they register to vote. Montana made voting more accessible for people with disabilities, even as it ended same-day voter registration.

Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams, a Republican who fought for his state’s policy changes, said the GOP needs to “stop being scared of voters.”

“Let them vote, and go out and make the case,” he said in an interview, adding: “I want Republicans to succeed. I think it’s an unforced error to shoot themselves in the foot in these states by shrinking access. You don’t need to do that.”

Seventy-one new laws easing voting rules are poised to benefit 63 million eligible voters across 28 states, or about one-quarter of the U.S. voting population, according to the Voting Rights Lab report, which tracked policy changes as of June 13.

Thirty-one new laws in 18 states create more barriers to the ballot box, affecting 36 million eligible voters, or 15 percent of the voting population, the report stated.

Legislative debates over restrictions are ongoing in key states such as Texas and Pennsylvania, leaving open the possibility that new limitations affecting millions more voters will still be enacted before the end of the year.

The uncertainty is heightened by a standoff on Capitol Hill over Democratic-backed legislation to protect voting rights. On Tuesday, Senate Republicans blocked a test vote that would have cleared the way to start debate on the bill, known as the For the People Act, which Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) vowed to fight.

Senate Republicans block debate on elections bill, dealing blow to Democrats’ voting rights push

“States are stepping up in the absence of or while waiting for congressional action,” said Eliza Sweren-Becker, voting rights and elections counsel at the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice, adding: “Some of this is really a call to action to Washington.”

Absent federal standards, voters’ experiences will vary widely from state to state in details large and small — from the length of lines on Election Day to the process for registering to vote or casting a mail ballot. Starting this year, the contrast is poised to become more dramatic as the wave of new election laws begins to take effect.

“Voting rights really shouldn’t be impacted by boundary lines that are drawn arbitrarily for states,” said Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) of Nevada, which enacted universal mail voting this year. “It should be the same for everybody. … It shouldn’t be dependent on who is in power and who is not and who is passing the laws.”

Legacy of the pandemic
The new laws that ease the voting process build on emergency actions taken to protect voters during the pandemic, when public health measures barred many people from leaving home or gathering in public places.

Before 2020, only five states automatically sent mail ballots to all voters, a figure that jumped to nine — plus the District of Columbia — for November’s general election. Roughly three dozen states offered no-excuse absentee voting or proactively mailed absentee ballot applications to voters, leading to a spike in the number of Americans who cast ballots by mail.

Under laws passed this year, Vermont and Nevada will mail ballots to active voters for general elections and all elections, respectively. Maryland has created a permanent absentee voter list, which allows voters to sign up to receive mail ballots for every election, and Connecticut and New York are moving toward amending their state constitutions to allow voters to cast mail ballots without an excuse.

So far, nearly two dozen states have taken steps to improve the process of mail voting — agreeing to pay for return postage for ballots, expand the use of drop boxes or give election administrators more time to process returned mail ballots before Election Day, for example.

These moves reflect the popularity of the more flexible voting options during the pandemic and election administrators’ success in implementing them securely for November’s contests.

“We started getting input pretty early from our residents, saying, ‘This is great — why can’t we do this all the time?’” Sisolak said in an interview.

In 2020, active voters in the state received ballots in the mail for both the June primary and the general election. Sisolak noted that Nevada Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske, a Republican, found no evidence to support GOP claims of widespread voter fraud in the state.

“You’re always going to get the naysayers and the haters that are going to complain about the process, but it proved very effective and very secure so I’m happy about it,” he said. The majority-Democratic state legislature approved the new system with Republicans unified in opposition....

farley3k wrote:

I posted it the white supremacy thread but maybe it goes better here based on the article above

Well this video clip on CNN is well worth watching - go old white guy!

General's response to Gaetz's question leaves him shaking his head

Smarmy sex offender thinks he knows something about military readiness.

The GOP is all about the soldiers. That's why we need Wounded Warrior Project and hundreds of other private charities, because they won't fund "socialist" aftercare for soldiers (hey, can't raise taxes, right?). Capitalism at it's most refined - use, abuse and dump the young fighters out of the system, if they wanted a pleasant retirement they'd have used the stock market to make themselves millionaires before being blown out of a HMMV at age 24...

Prederick wrote:

Partisan war over teaching history and racism stokes tensions in U.S. schools

The school board of Virginia's wealthy Loudoun County had planned to hold a routine meeting to close out the school year. Instead, it was pandemonium.

Many of the hundreds of parents who flooded the auditorium in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., on Tuesday night were there to accuse the schools of teaching their kids that racism in America is structural and systemic - which the board denies. Some signs read, "Education not indoctrination" and "You don't end racism by teaching it."

The evening grew so heated that the board walked out of the room, leaving sheriff's deputies to disperse the crowd.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Wayde Byard, the Loudoun County Public Schools spokesman for more than two decades, after deputies took two attendees out of the room in handcuffs.

Loudoun has been roiled for months by accusations that it has embraced critical race theory, a school of thought that maintains that racism is ingrained in U.S. law and institutions and that legacies of slavery and segregation have created an uneven playing field for Black Americans.

The school system says it is simply training teachers, the majority of whom are white, to be “culturally responsive" to serve the county's increasingly diverse student population.

The tensions in Loudoun echo a larger battle playing out across the country. As Americans tackle racial and social injustice in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd last year, several Republican-led states including Florida, Georgia and Texas have enacted new rules to limit teaching about the role of racism in the United States.

They say pictures are worth a thousand words and the pics that a Reuters photog took and posted on Twitter sure tells one hell of a story about how unhinged that meeting was.

Morning Consult recently surveyed Americans about CRT. See if you can guess which group has been exposed to non-stop propaganda about it for the past several months.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/TBYcwlm.png)

Prederick wrote:

Partisan war over teaching history and racism stokes tensions in U.S. schools

The school board of Virginia's wealthy Loudoun County had planned to hold a routine meeting to close out the school year. Instead, it was pandemonium.

Many of the hundreds of parents who flooded the auditorium in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., on Tuesday night were there to accuse the schools of teaching their kids that racism in America is structural and systemic - which the board denies. Some signs read, "Education not indoctrination" and "You don't end racism by teaching it."

The evening grew so heated that the board walked out of the room, leaving sheriff's deputies to disperse the crowd.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Wayde Byard, the Loudoun County Public Schools spokesman for more than two decades, after deputies took two attendees out of the room in handcuffs.

Loudoun has been roiled for months by accusations that it has embraced critical race theory, a school of thought that maintains that racism is ingrained in U.S. law and institutions and that legacies of slavery and segregation have created an uneven playing field for Black Americans.

The school system says it is simply training teachers, the majority of whom are white, to be “culturally responsive" to serve the county's increasingly diverse student population.

The tensions in Loudoun echo a larger battle playing out across the country. As Americans tackle racial and social injustice in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd last year, several Republican-led states including Florida, Georgia and Texas have enacted new rules to limit teaching about the role of racism in the United States.

Same thing happened at JCPS board meeting in Louisville last night. Protesters outside, and inside, and tried to attack the board, but CRT isn't taught, wasn't on the agenda, and security threw their asses out so the board could finish the meeting.

Paleocon wrote:
farley3k wrote:

I posted it the white supremacy thread but maybe it goes better here based on the article above

Well this video clip on CNN is well worth watching - go old white guy!

General's response to Gaetz's question leaves him shaking his head

Smarmy sex offender thinks he knows something about military readiness.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/Zn8L3qt.png)

I couldn't imagine a Republican Congressperson saying something like this twenty years ago and not be immediately denounced by everyone with an 'R' behind their name and bounced from the party.