[News] Post a Political News Story

Ongoing discussion of the political news of the day. This thread is for 'smaller' stories that don't call for their own thread. If a story blows up, please start a new thread for it.

Stengah wrote:
absurddoctor wrote:
Malor wrote:
fangblackbone wrote:

How is "segregated town" a thing in 2020?

They did some interesting "population studies" with agents awhile back, trying to examine how neighborhoods form. They were using extremely simple agents, just dots in a grid. The typical setup was to sprinkle the dots randomly, and then evaluate the 'happiness' of the dots, with the happiness function changing for different experiments. If a dot was happy, it stayed where it was; if it was unhappy, it tried to find another unhappy dot to swap with.

One of the interesting things that came out of the sim was that you got strong population patterns from even very slight awareness of dot color. In one experiment, for instance, dots were either red or blue, and wanted to live near other dots of the same color, but only just barely... if they had one neighbor (out of 8) that was their color, they were happy. They were just fine with 7 out of 8 dots being different, as long as one was like them.

Well, what happened, after all the dots swapped and settled down into a stable configuration, was that you ended up with segregated neighborhoods. Even that tiny preference ended up arranging all the dots into broad swaths of the same color. As the scientist running the experiment said, roughly, that just looking at that layout, you'd think those were seriously racist dots, when in fact they cared the minimum amount above zero that they could in that simple simulation.

At least in a dot sim, it seems to require a large fraction of the population actively seeking diversity to make dots settle in heterogeneous patches. Simple tolerance isn't enough.

Anecdotally, NYC seems like a solid example of this in real life. Before I lived there, I accepted its reputation as the most diverse place in the country. And there is some truth to that. Good chunks of Manhattan seem to bear that out during business hours. But then everyone goes home, and for most people they travel to neighborhoods where everyone else looks like them. There have been plenty of other pressures to make things this way, but at least when I lived there, the people who had the means to work on creating more diverse neighborhoods didn't seem to have any desire to do so. (With the exception, maybe, of some middle to upper class white people with kids, who would speak of wanting their kids to see some diversity in their schools. When I heard this sentiment, it always seemed like there was a hidden asterisk of 'but not too much').

They want some diversity in their neighborhood, but not so many that they become the minority.

I always marvel at how folks my age refer to the neighborhood I grew up in as a “very diverse community” when I remember my high school as virtually all white with a few marginalized minorities. The same folks now complain that the same high school is “Chinatown” now that it has a 30% Asian attendance (and is still majority white).

Someone did a study on this that I'm too busy to look for right now, but there's a quantifiable number where you make the switch from "acceptably diverse" to "white flight," and it it was something like 20% or so, perhaps lower.

But yes, NYC is America's most "diverse" city, but is fairly segregated residentially (I believe Milwaukee is the nation's worst) and educationally, is probably America's most segregated city.

Yesterday on Twitter there were a lot of pictures of armed black people protesting in Brunswick, Georgia.

They just wanted to have a conversation.

I'm honestly glad to see people standing up for their rights and demanding justice. I just hope the racist rednecks down there don't get trigger happy. Again.

McConnell really is a sh*thead...

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Senate Republicans and the White House will be unified on how and when to move ahead on a phase four recovery package that could give funding to state and local governments.

“We’re basically assessing what we've done already,” McConnell said. “I'm in constant communication with the White House. If we decide to go forward, we will go forward together."“In the meantime, I don't think we have yet felt the urgency of acting immediately. That time could [come], but I don’t think it has yet," McConnell said.

Haven't felt the urgency? Open your eyes dipsh*t.

A third of Kentuckians have filed for unemployment, the highest rate in the country. Kind of amazing one of their Senators thinks it's nbd.

OG_slinger wrote:

A third of Kentuckians have filed for unemployment, the highest rate in the country. Kind of amazing one of their Senators thinks it's nbd.

And baby turtle's economic crisis was just right.

Farscry wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Yeah. That sh*t would get me in a very firebomby mood.

Look, I know we're supposed to temper our emotions, but I'm right there with Paleo. I know it can be construed as dragging down the level of discourse, but at the same time, I really struggle with the question of "what's the f*cking point of decorum?" when we're talking about systemic racism creating conditions that allow very likely premeditated murderers to just get on with their lives with nary a peep of consequence.

I also know this isn't even remotely our first rodeo with this crap in the US.

Which only serves to make it ever more enraging each time we witness essentially ironclad proof of these incidents.

Raging on an unjust and broken system is different from getting ranty and devolving to interpersonal attacks. Directing anger and heated words at fellow peers for their opinions here is not looked kindly upon, but against a corrupt government shouldered by white supremecy within its law enforcement I have zero issues, so would prefer we not conflate the two.

My concerns regarding allowing forums as platforms for folks to express wishes of violent justice or death upon other people as a means of venting frustatrion or helplessness is more to deter the notion of that kind of thing in general is normal and acceptable around here.

Speaking of white supremacy within law enforcement:

Lawyer: Louisville Cops Did Not Identify Themselves During ‘Botched’ Raid That Killed EMT, Led to Her Boyfriend’s Attempted Murder Charge for Shooting Officer
WP: Family seeks answers in fatal police shooting of Louisville woman in her apartment

Breonna Taylor was working as an EMT in Louisville when the coronavirus pandemic hit the country, helping to save lives while trying to protect her own.

On March 13, the 26-year-old aspiring nurse was killed in her apartment, shot at least eight times by Louisville police officers who officials have said were executing a drug warrant, according to a lawsuit filed by the family, accusing officers of wrongful death, excessive force and gross negligence.

The cops were at the wrong apartment complex, the suspect they were looking for was already in police custody, and they entered unannounced.

I call that murder.

Since when does executing a drug warrant warrant guns a-blazin'?

were they just in the wrong place, or was this a hit? It seems odd to go to the wrong apartment complex when you've already apprehended the guy.

fangblackbone wrote:

Since when does executing a drug warrant warrant guns a-blazin'?

Her boyfriend, a licensed gun owner, fired a shot at the intruders (he wasn't aware they were police since they didn't announce) and hit one in the leg. The officers returned fire (20 times apparently).

Tennessee has a "Castle Doctrine" but that clearly won't apply here because the victims are black and the offenders are police.

IMAGE(https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/96664735_935542992216_7358863700721139712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_oc=AQn2_4jY9dJY1qsL4_1UG_rJwzNbi5z5JF4KREQtTkKXaWGvpvgKxC9Rmb0CQNz-UXo&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=19df948841eaa3bff54a5d93f6fe8050&oe=5EDFAE13)

thrawn82 wrote:

were they just in the wrong place, or was this a hit? It seems odd to go to the wrong apartment complex when you've already apprehended the guy.

It's possible that the Louisville police are breathtakingly incompetent and an active danger to society.

They didn't even manage to plant any drugs in the apartment to find.

Courier Journal: Who was Breonna Taylor? What to know about the Louisville EMT shot and killed by police

After Walker's shot, LMPD officers returned fire, police say.

The lawsuit says that officers "failed to use any sound reasonable judgment" and fired "more than 25 blind shots into multiple homes."

Eggert has said he inspected the apartment building on Springfield Drive where Taylor lived and found evidence of 20 gunshots fired into the building, some of which entered other apartments.

It's a miracle more people aren't dead.

Gremlin wrote:
thrawn82 wrote:

were they just in the wrong place, or was this a hit? It seems odd to go to the wrong apartment complex when you've already apprehended the guy.

It's possible that the Louisville police are breathtakingly incompetent and an active danger to society.

They didn't even manage to plant any drugs in the apartment to find.

Courier Journal: Who was Breonna Taylor? What to know about the Louisville EMT shot and killed by police

After Walker's shot, LMPD officers returned fire, police say.

The lawsuit says that officers "failed to use any sound reasonable judgment" and fired "more than 25 blind shots into multiple homes."

Eggert has said he inspected the apartment building on Springfield Drive where Taylor lived and found evidence of 20 gunshots fired into the building, some of which entered other apartments.

It's a miracle more people aren't dead.

Police in the United States are on a whole, undertrained. I'd like to see a system where there's far fewer officers allowed to carry/use deadly force (call it 10% of all law enforcement officers) but the same budget if not more is used to train those who are.

Clumber wrote:
Gremlin wrote:
thrawn82 wrote:

were they just in the wrong place, or was this a hit? It seems odd to go to the wrong apartment complex when you've already apprehended the guy.

It's possible that the Louisville police are breathtakingly incompetent and an active danger to society.

They didn't even manage to plant any drugs in the apartment to find.

Courier Journal: Who was Breonna Taylor? What to know about the Louisville EMT shot and killed by police

After Walker's shot, LMPD officers returned fire, police say.

The lawsuit says that officers "failed to use any sound reasonable judgment" and fired "more than 25 blind shots into multiple homes."

Eggert has said he inspected the apartment building on Springfield Drive where Taylor lived and found evidence of 20 gunshots fired into the building, some of which entered other apartments.

It's a miracle more people aren't dead.

Police in the United States are on a whole, undertrained. I'd like to see a system where there's far fewer officers allowed to carry/use deadly force (call it 10% of all law enforcement officers) but the same budget if not more is used to train those who are.

We need reliable non-lethal subduing technology yesterday. Stun them all and let the cameras and the courts sort it out.

JLS wrote:

We need reliable non-lethal subduing technology yesterday. Stun them all and let the cameras and the courts sort it out.

Yeah, this, all cop's guns fire a bullet out the front and the taser out the back whenever the trigger is pulled.

Tanglebones wrote:

IMAGE(https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/96664735_935542992216_7358863700721139712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_oc=AQn2_4jY9dJY1qsL4_1UG_rJwzNbi5z5JF4KREQtTkKXaWGvpvgKxC9Rmb0CQNz-UXo&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=19df948841eaa3bff54a5d93f6fe8050&oe=5EDFAE13)

Like I keep saying.

White folks all bugging about Asian Murder Hornets when they should be minding their Caucasian Stand Your Ground Wasps.

Clumber wrote:
Gremlin wrote:
thrawn82 wrote:

were they just in the wrong place, or was this a hit? It seems odd to go to the wrong apartment complex when you've already apprehended the guy.

It's possible that the Louisville police are breathtakingly incompetent and an active danger to society.

They didn't even manage to plant any drugs in the apartment to find.

Courier Journal: Who was Breonna Taylor? What to know about the Louisville EMT shot and killed by police

After Walker's shot, LMPD officers returned fire, police say.

The lawsuit says that officers "failed to use any sound reasonable judgment" and fired "more than 25 blind shots into multiple homes."

Eggert has said he inspected the apartment building on Springfield Drive where Taylor lived and found evidence of 20 gunshots fired into the building, some of which entered other apartments.

It's a miracle more people aren't dead.

Police in the United States are on a whole, undertrained. I'd like to see a system where there's far fewer officers allowed to carry/use deadly force (call it 10% of all law enforcement officers) but the same budget if not more is used to train those who are.

I bring up the point all the f*cking time that in the state of North Carolina, you can become a sworn law enforcement officer with a badge and gun and the power entrusted by the state to deny a citizen's life or liberty with as little as 600 hours of training. And in many departments, that is all you ever get in your entire law enforcement career.

For contrast, in the same state, you are not allowed (and are criminally liable if you do) to cut hair for money without completing 1800 hours of classroom training.

A barber is literally three times better trained than a cop.

Because they have to set a standard that the types of people they want to install in those positions (and who even want the job) can actually achieve? Speaks volumes.

Amoebic wrote:
Farscry wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Yeah. That sh*t would get me in a very firebomby mood.

Look, I know we're supposed to temper our emotions, but I'm right there with Paleo. I know it can be construed as dragging down the level of discourse, but at the same time, I really struggle with the question of "what's the f*cking point of decorum?" when we're talking about systemic racism creating conditions that allow very likely premeditated murderers to just get on with their lives with nary a peep of consequence.

I also know this isn't even remotely our first rodeo with this crap in the US.

Which only serves to make it ever more enraging each time we witness essentially ironclad proof of these incidents.

Raging on an unjust and broken system is different from getting ranty and devolving to interpersonal attacks. Directing anger and heated words at fellow peers for their opinions here is not looked kindly upon, but against a corrupt government shouldered by white supremecy within its law enforcement I have zero issues, so would prefer we not conflate the two.

My concerns regarding allowing forums as platforms for folks to express wishes of violent justice or death upon other people as a means of venting frustatrion or helplessness is more to deter the notion of that kind of thing in general is normal and acceptable around here.

This is just one of many reasons why you are an admin and I am not. I have always, always struggled with trying to not let my emotions -- especially anger -- get the better of me.

Severe injustices like that perpetrated against Ahmaud Arbery generate a nearly incoherent rage inside me that I have no way to productively channel. I find myself struggling to tamp down the impulse to commit violence against the perpetrators -- not that I am either in any position to take any action nor do I rationally think it is the right course of action.

Blargh, I don't even know what I'm trying to say, other than that I have the utmost respect for you, Amoebic.

They bend me out of shape too Farscry. Just ask Sean Sands about a time we were going to meet up and he got lost and wandered into an arena in Everquest.

The senselessness of it is what boils my blood. The laws need to be changed regarding guns because did you shoot or did you not shoot and did you plan to shoot beforehand are oversimplifications.

Guns are lethal tools and determining criminality in the decision process should be way more granular:
when did you buy the gun
what type of gun did you buy
what type of ammo did you buy
how much ammo did you buy
how much ammo do you have in store
how much ammo do you have on you
what is the clip size
was it a full clip
did you reload
did you remove it from your holster
was it concealed carry
did you raise it towards another human being
did you point it at another human being
did you fire it at another human being
how many times did you fire it at a human being

Answers to each of these questions are critical to determining whether a human life will be lost. A gun owner should carry that responsibility in order to own and wield one.

It is quite literally incomprehensible to me that this could happen and the entire chain of command involved in planning, signing off and executing this raid not be immediately suspended and investigated. Yet another completely innocent person of colour was killed during a no-knock raid and it's just another 'unfortunate accident' as far as authorities are concerned? I know it's not my place to comment on domestic issues in the US but when the rule of law finally dies there it's going to have enormous repercussions for the rest of us... It is quite literally a death sentence to be black there, even at 0100 in your own goddamned home. Absolutely unbelievable and truly chilling, I can't imagine the background stress you're all dealing with at the moment.

Paleocon wrote:

White folks all bugging about Asian Murder Hornets when they should be minding their Caucasian Stand Your Ground Wasps WASPs.

Guess who is back.

The Bureau of Land Management is investigating whether Nevada rancher Ryan Bundy illegally built new irrigation infrastructure across Gold Butte National Monument, the same area where his family unlawfully grazes cattle on public lands.
The Bureau of Land Management is investigating whether Nevada rancher Ryan Bundy illegally built new irrigation infrastructure across Gold Butte National Monument, the same area where his family unlawfully grazes cattle on public lands.

A BLM official declined to comment on the allegations to E&E News but wrote emails to two individuals familiar with the situation that it is "under investigation" as of last week.

In an email to E&E News, Ryan Bundy said he was unaware of BLM's inquiry into his irrigation efforts.

A group of local hikers who visited the 300,000-acre monument in southeastern Nevada in mid-April first reported the incident to BLM.

The four-page complaint, a copy of which was provided to E&E News, includes GPS coordinates of new irrigation trenches, as well as photos of equipment used to lay irrigation pipe, including a tractor.

"The trenching is noted by disturbed soil and plants and in some places it came close enough to bust out the road surface," states the report, addressed to Gold Butte National Monument acting Land Manager James Lee Kirk, as well as congressional lawmakers and a local official.

The complaint expresses the hikers' "disgust and dismay" over the extensive irrigation project.

"It's a true scar where just that morning there had been pristine desert," the complaint states.

One of the individuals who filed the complaint spoke with E&E News on the condition of anonymity. The individual said that the hikers crossed paths with Ryan Bundy as he drove a flatbed truck carrying several reels of sprinkler line used for irrigation projects.

The missive concludes with a suggestion that Bundy is likely using the system for additional cattle watering troughs in the area and will increase the number of livestock that the Bundy clan illegally grazes in the region.

"Our conclusion truly is that we are dismayed that this problem continues in this protected area and is likely to get worse if no action is taken," the complaint says.

Very sparse information so far, and I'm not familiar with the source, so maybe it won't blow up again, but...

Gremlin wrote:

Guess who is back.

The Bureau of Land Management is investigating whether Nevada rancher Ryan Bundy illegally built new irrigation infrastructure across Gold Butte National Monument, the same area where his family unlawfully grazes cattle on public lands.
The Bureau of Land Management is investigating whether Nevada rancher Ryan Bundy illegally built new irrigation infrastructure across Gold Butte National Monument, the same area where his family unlawfully grazes cattle on public lands.

A BLM official declined to comment on the allegations to E&E News but wrote emails to two individuals familiar with the situation that it is "under investigation" as of last week.

In an email to E&E News, Ryan Bundy said he was unaware of BLM's inquiry into his irrigation efforts.

A group of local hikers who visited the 300,000-acre monument in southeastern Nevada in mid-April first reported the incident to BLM.

The four-page complaint, a copy of which was provided to E&E News, includes GPS coordinates of new irrigation trenches, as well as photos of equipment used to lay irrigation pipe, including a tractor.

"The trenching is noted by disturbed soil and plants and in some places it came close enough to bust out the road surface," states the report, addressed to Gold Butte National Monument acting Land Manager James Lee Kirk, as well as congressional lawmakers and a local official.

The complaint expresses the hikers' "disgust and dismay" over the extensive irrigation project.

"It's a true scar where just that morning there had been pristine desert," the complaint states.

One of the individuals who filed the complaint spoke with E&E News on the condition of anonymity. The individual said that the hikers crossed paths with Ryan Bundy as he drove a flatbed truck carrying several reels of sprinkler line used for irrigation projects.

The missive concludes with a suggestion that Bundy is likely using the system for additional cattle watering troughs in the area and will increase the number of livestock that the Bundy clan illegally grazes in the region.

"Our conclusion truly is that we are dismayed that this problem continues in this protected area and is likely to get worse if no action is taken," the complaint says.

Very sparse information so far, and I'm not familiar with the source, so maybe it won't blow up again, but...

Obama should have drone struck those terrorists when they took over Malheur.

Guess who's government just gave their federal police force the right to check out your browser history without a warrant?

NOT MINE. I'M CANADIAN!!

US folks, OTOH.

The US Senate has voted to give law enforcement agencies access to web browsing data without a warrant, dramatically expanding the government’s surveillance powers in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

he power grab was led by Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell as part of a reauthorization of the Patriot Act, which gives federal agencies broad domestic surveillance powers. Sens. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Steve Daines (R-MT) attempted to remove the expanded powers from the bill with a bipartisan amendment.

But in a shock upset, the privacy-preserving amendment fell short by a single vote after several senators who would have voted “Yes” failed to show up to the session, including Bernie Sanders. 9 Democratic senators also voted “No,” causing the amendment to fall short of the 60-vote threshold it needed to pass.

mudbunny wrote:

But in a shock upset, the privacy-preserving amendment fell short by a single vote after several senators who would have voted “Yes” failed to show up to the session, including Bernie Sanders.

"Failing to show up" seems consistent across the board with anything involving Bernie Sanders these days.

Maybe his faith in humanity and self preservation has been exhausted.

FBI serves warrant on senator in investigation of stock sales linked to coronavirus

LA Times wrote:

Federal agents seized a cellphone belonging to a prominent Republican senator on Wednesday night as part of the Justice Department’s investigation into controversial stock trades he made as the novel coronavirus first struck the U.S., a law enforcement official said.
Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, turned over his phone to agents after they served a search warrant on the lawmaker at his residence in the Washington area, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss a law enforcement action.

The seizure represents a significant escalation in the investigation into whether Burr violated a law preventing members of Congress from trading on insider information they have gleaned from their official work.

To obtain a search warrant, federal agents and prosecutors must persuade a judge they have probable cause to believe a crime has been committed. The law enforcement official said the Justice Department is examining Burr’s communications with his broker.

Such a warrant being served on a sitting U.S. senator would require approval from the highest ranks of the Justice Department and is a step that would not be taken lightly. Kerri Kupec, a Justice Department spokeswoman, declined to comment.

A second law enforcement official said FBI agents served a warrant in recent days on Apple to obtain information from Burr’s iCloud account and said agents used data obtained from the California-based company as part of the evidence used to obtain the warrant for the senator’s phone.

Burr sold a significant percentage of his stock portfolio in 33 different transactions on Feb. 13, just as his committee was receiving daily coronavirus briefings and a week before the stock market declined sharply. Much of the stock was invested in businesses that in subsequent weeks were hit hard by the plunging market.

Burr's brother-in-law and Sen. Loeffler and her husband are probably sh*tting their pants right about now.