Help me build my PC 2017 Catch All

Gaald wrote:

So I did a fresh install of Windows 10 on a new SSD and for the most part I have everything back up and running.

The windows install was quick. Unfortunately there was some weirdness with the old install. My data drives were preventing the new Windows 10 install from being seen by my motherboard. When I manually forced the motherboard to startup from that drive, and windows had loaded up, two of the data drives were missing. They weren't even recognized by disk manager.

So I backed up all the info on those drives wiped them clean and did a reformat. Voila everything works great now. Except all that data transfer took forever, even over USB 3. Ugh!

Not sure how long I will wait before wiping the old SSD drive but it's sitting in the system waiting for me to reformat whenever I think the time is right, and then I will be able to use it as a current games played folder for faster load times! Squee!

I know this one well, because I've seen it many times over the years since Windows 10 was released.

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...

Method 1 in the response works every time I've tried it. Windows 10's Troubleshooting tool does amazing work when it comes to finding hardware, even when Device Manager won't see something. I see this frequently with data drives that are migrated between machines or to a freshly installed Windows 10 instance. Repartitioning/reformatting them may also work, but the troubleshooting tool seems to slap Windows 10 back into line and make it recognize the drives without doing anything else.

Here's the procedure in case the link is dead in the future...

Nyima Yonten from Microsoft wrote:

Method 1: I suggest you to run the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter and check if it helps.

1. Press Windows Key, then click on Search bar.
2. Type “Troubleshooting” without the quotes and click on Troubleshooting.
3. Then click on View All on the left panel of the screen.
4. Click on Hardware and Devices.
5. Click on Next and follow the instructions.

If the issues still persist, refer to the below methods.

All well. It was a pain in the ass but I am glad I wiped and re partitioned them. It gave me a chance to change the partition sizes which I had wanted to do anyways.

Plus there was the issue with the drives screwing up the boot sequence for some reason.

I'm having a slightly nightmare build going on. At the least, I'm posting from it. Will report all the weirdness at some point.

Gaald wrote:

All well. It was a pain in the ass but I am glad I wiped and re partitioned them. It gave me a chance to change the partition sizes which I had wanted to do anyways.

Plus there was the issue with the drives screwing up the boot sequence for some reason.

The first time I came across this I did the exact same thing. I'd become used to Device Manager's showing everything - even stuff that wasn't working. UEFI has changed that. I don't know why Device Manager hasn't been altered to include Windows 10's hardware troubleshooting routine (which probes UEFI) but it hasn't. That makes the "Find new hardware" menu option a lot less useful.

My computer is pretty old. It still has a bios.

I think I have my parts picked out for sure now. The i5 might sound like overkill for a file server/media server but I may end up offloading some video encoding tasks to it because it will probably run circles around my current i5-760 (yes 760 not 7600). Will probably place the order when I get paid next week for everything except the SAS card. I have already ordered a Case-Labs Mercury S8 case.

I will need to get some case fans as well (I'm thinking 4x120mm and 1x140mm to start with but I am unsure about what will fit in the spot for the second PSU and I want to put one down there to help cool the HDDs). Who is making good quality and most importantly quiet and LEDless case fans these days?

I've got my quarterly bonus earmarked for a new PC but everything I'm seeing has the graphics card market just being bonkers over priced. I'm trying to hold out till Nvidia releases their next series as well. Has anyone seen/heard anything promising on graphics cards lately?

Skiptron wrote:

I've got my quarterly bonus earmarked for a new PC but everything I'm seeing has the graphics card market just being bonkers over priced. I'm trying to hold out till Nvidia releases their next series as well. Has anyone seen/heard anything promising on graphics cards lately?

They have dropped a little... How much seems to depend on which card you're looking at.

Skiptron wrote:

I've got my quarterly bonus earmarked for a new PC but everything I'm seeing has the graphics card market just being bonkers over priced. I'm trying to hold out till Nvidia releases their next series as well. Has anyone seen/heard anything promising on graphics cards lately?

No the market is truly F'd right now. At best you can consider yourself lucky if you pick up a 1070Ti or 1080 for $100 or so over retail. 1080Ti's at best go for $200 above retail if you are lucky enough to be refreshing at the right time. Ram pricing is also really high but not to the level of gouging that we are seeing in GPU's.

Right now the solid move is to buy a prebuilt from a good vendor... but even then you are overpaying vs the normalized build yourself pricing but at this point its the only sane move.

New Nvidia cards will be snatched up by miners as well since they should provide a significant boost to mining so unless you get lucky and put a pre-order in in time when they are eventually offered up you will be faced with shortages and retailer price gouging.

Nvidia.com is a good place to buy a GPU from but its like winning the lottery you have to be on line and get the card in your cart the instant it goes up for sale since they go out of stock within minutes.

Rumors are saying Nvidia announces their new GPU's in April/May but when they actually hit the market is anyone's guess. Given they are printing money with the existing GPU's I wouldn't hold your breath that we will see anything from Nvidia until late 2018 if not 2019.

I think the launch of the Titan V which used to be $1200 in years past but was $3000 this time around tells you all you need to know about Nvidia's mind set on the GPU market.

Rykin wrote:

I think I have my parts picked out for sure now. The i5 might sound like overkill for a file server/media server but I may end up offloading some video encoding tasks to it because it will probably run circles around my current i5-760 (yes 760 not 7600). Will probably place the order when I get paid next week for everything except the SAS card. I have already ordered a Case-Labs Mercury S8 case.

I will need to get some case fans as well (I'm thinking 4x120mm and 1x140mm to start with but I am unsure about what will fit in the spot for the second PSU and I want to put one down there to help cool the HDDs). Who is making good quality and most importantly quiet and LEDless case fans these days?

I'd run Plex on that system for sure.

For fans there are tons of choices based on your criteria. Cougar and Noctua make some good ones which fit the bill, but my favorite as far as bang for the buck are the Fractal Design GP-14 and X2 GP-14. (The X2 has a better bearing.)

Alright, I think I built my PC in late 2010. So, it might be time for an upgrade. Since it's been so long since I've done this and I have less time to actually research things, I think I'm going to bug you people about it.

I'm pretty sure I'm going with a Ryzen 1600. Any motherboard recommendations would be appreciated. I just use the PC for games, I don't plan on ever needing to overclock, I doubt I'll ever run more than one GPU and I never use more than three USB ports.

Is there a mid-range video card I could go with to tide me over while I wait for bitcoin to die?

I'm assuming it's a good idea to get a new power supply even if the one I've got hasn't given me any issues?

iaintgotnopants wrote:

Is there a mid-range video card I could go with to tide me over while I wait for bitcoin to die?

I'm assuming it's a good idea to get a new power supply even if the one I've got hasn't given me any issues?

1060 or below on the videocard, and the fleecing is still bad-ish on 1060's. I think $100-$150 over MSRP is about the best you'll do for one.

Yes on the new PSU, at ~8 years old it's aged quite a bit.

Between GPU and RAM prices it's a rough time to be building though.

As Guru says upthread, it can actually save you a small amount of money buying pre-built right now.

I'd go through all the custom build sites I could find and see who lets you pick the parts you want to a degree that satisfies you and compare their prices with your best equivalent build put together on PCPartpicker.

With videocard prices what they are at worst it'll probably be very close to the same but at best you might save $100 or so.

As bad as Nvidia GPU pricing is AMD is even worse. Vega 56 cards are going for $999 or basically double their MSRP.

Nvidia warns its going to get worse

https://www.dsogaming.com/news/nvidi...

Thanks everyone for the help and advice recently.
I got my Ryzen 7 1700 system up and running. No problems yet, thankfully. It's amazingly quiet.
I was able to have PUBG running on ultra and also stream out to Twitch via OBS at the same time without any noticeable slowdown.
I installed Ubuntu on my old i5 750 Lynnfield box, and got it running as a file server. I threw Plex on my Ryzen box and am using the i5 file server as the back-end. It doesn't look like the Plex application is pulling a ton of resources when streaming, and my local network appears to be holding up just fine.
I'm very pleased with how smoothly the whole thing went.

Eleima wrote:

I think I might've offered previously, but if crazy cuckoo GPU prices remain the same in the US, I'm willing to volunteer as your GPU mule and ship 'em over. Sale season is nearly over, so I'd have to double check current prices, but I bought my MSI Gaming GeForce GTX 1070Ti for 520€ (~$650).
Which..... seems to be over a thousand bucks on Newegg, what the actual crap?!? o_O

Just sayin’.......

I got a 1080 for $600 on Newegg just by checking on prices and availability once or twice a day for a week or so. I think it's possible, but you need to be on the lookout a bit.

Thin_J wrote:

Between GPU and RAM prices it's a rough time to be building though.

As Guru says upthread, it can actually save you a small amount of money buying pre-built right now.

I'd go through all the custom build sites I could find and see who lets you pick the parts you want to a degree that satisfies you and compare their prices with your best equivalent build put together on PCPartpicker.

With videocard prices what they are at worst it'll probably be very close to the same but at best you might save $100 or so.

I did try looking at pre-built systems but couldn't find anything I would call decent under $1000. Right now my pcpartpicker list is at $750 and I still might get a cheaper motherboard. Any pre-built that I can find in that range is a Ryzen 3 without an SSD. It's entirely possible that I'm looking in the wrong places though.

I hadn't looked at RAM prices until I saw your post. Why are they so high? I my original thought was to put in 16 but I'll probably back it down to 8 because of the prices.

Dell has some prebuilts under $1000 that might be worth a look. All with GTX 1060 3GB cards, so if that's good enough, then maybe.

I'm running a copy of Windows 10 Home that was a free upgrade from Win 7 OEM.

If I change my motherboard, RAM, and CPU will Windows just figure it out for me when I next boot? Is a clean install required/advised? If so, will my old Win 7 OEM license work, or do I need to purchase a new key as well?

Also, RAM prices, amirite?

*Legion* wrote:

Dell has some prebuilts under $1000 that might be worth a look. All with GTX 1060 3GB cards, so if that's good enough, then maybe.

Not going to lie, I didn't even realize Dell was still a thing. One of those is pretty tempting but it's still right around what I would pay for slightly better parts. It's probably just going to come down to how I feel when I start buying stuff.

Man, if I buy a Dell my subconscious is going to drive me crazy by constantly whispering, "dude, you're getting a Dell."

I haven't bought one in a long time, but the last Dell I had was fine. I think the power supply wasn't that good, but the rest of it was all standard stuff. At one time (like, twenty or twenty-five years ago) they used non-ATX motherboards, but AFAIK they're all bog-standard now.

Man, pricing is just crazy right now. It's making consoles look unusually attractive.

Newegg was doing prebuilts at one time, maybe they might have something good?

BushPilot wrote:

I'm running a copy of Windows 10 Home that was a free upgrade from Win 7 OEM.

If I change my motherboard, RAM, and CPU will Windows just figure it out for me when I next boot? Is a clean install required/advised? If so, will my old Win 7 OEM license work, or do I need to purchase a new key as well?

Also, RAM prices, amirite?

I'd recommend a clean install, but save your W7 serial number. I ran into this with a PC I had to rebuild with new CPU and motherboard. I had to get into a chat with Microsoft's Customer Service, but the dude walked me through it in a chat window and was able to tie my W7 OEM and W10 keys to the "new" machine.

Had I had the W7 key on hand, I would have been able to do the license transfer on my own, but I misplaced it at the time (then found it again while I was in chat with the CS dude). Sorry I can't recall the whole process in detail, since it's been over a year since I did that, but it was generally pretty easy, if not a little time consuming (not as time consuming as the old Windows 7 installers though).

Well, I'm getting my new build up and running, and I'm not happy with the 8700K's temps at 5 GHz with my giant watercooler. It had a couple cores spike up to the 100C limit when just running 3DMark. Overall, it seems to do okay, it just really likes to spike high quickly. Just seems bad. I would have been fine if it stayed under 90 with the spikes which isn't great but whatever.

Looks like a lot of people delid the thing with a tool for that and redo the thermal paste or whatever. I guess I'm going down that route.

Also having some weird stuff with the BIOS/UEFI taking forever to get through. I don't see any settings to quicken that up so I'm going to have to call EVGA on that one. It takes like 50 seconds or so before it will boot to Windows which then takes 5-10 seconds. Weird.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Well, I'm getting my new build up and running, and I'm not happy with the 8700K's temps at 5 GHz with my giant watercooler. It had a couple cores spike up to the 100C limit when just running 3DMark. Overall, it seems to do okay, it just really likes to spike high quickly. Just seems bad. I would have been fine if it stayed under 90 with the spikes which isn't great but whatever.

You may have just gotten unlucky on the silicon lottery side of things.

There's a fairly sizable number of them that require 1.4V or so to hit 5ghz and at that point you gotta go nuts on cooling (delidding etc) to make up for all the voltage you're cranking into the chip.

Would be curious what voltage you set, or if you used some kind of automatic setting what your motherboard/software decided to throw it at it try and keep it stable.

BushPilot wrote:

I'm running a copy of Windows 10 Home that was a free upgrade from Win 7 OEM.
If I change my motherboard, RAM, and CPU will Windows just figure it out for me when I next boot? Is a clean install required/advised? If so, will my old Win 7 OEM license work, or do I need to purchase a new key as well?
Also, RAM prices, amirite?

I had a couple of hurdles when I upgraded my rig, because I hadn't backed up my Windows 10 (upgraded from 7 as well), found my key midway through the process of talking with tech support, and didn't do a clean install. It was relatively painless though. If you really want to save yourself a headache though, I recommend this guide. Should tie your copy to your account and allow you to reactivate it once you've done a clean install with your new hardware. Because no, Windows will not really figure it out all by itself.

Thin_J wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Well, I'm getting my new build up and running, and I'm not happy with the 8700K's temps at 5 GHz with my giant watercooler. It had a couple cores spike up to the 100C limit when just running 3DMark. Overall, it seems to do okay, it just really likes to spike high quickly. Just seems bad. I would have been fine if it stayed under 90 with the spikes which isn't great but whatever.

You may have just gotten unlucky on the silicon lottery side of things.

There's a fairly sizable number of them that require 1.4V or so to hit 5ghz and at that point you gotta go nuts on cooling (delidding etc) to make up for all the voltage you're cranking into the chip.

Would be curious what voltage you set, or if you used some kind of automatic setting what your motherboard/software decided to throw it at it try and keep it stable.

I just did the auto for now. Not sure if that went too crazy with the voltage to keep it stable yet. It just spiked so hard that I'm not feeling good about the cooling at all. I might try going down to 4.8 or something to see if that makes a huge difference. If that put me at a max of 70, I might be okay, but if THAT still gets in the 80s, I'll probably go forward with the delid option.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
Thin_J wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Well, I'm getting my new build up and running, and I'm not happy with the 8700K's temps at 5 GHz with my giant watercooler. It had a couple cores spike up to the 100C limit when just running 3DMark. Overall, it seems to do okay, it just really likes to spike high quickly. Just seems bad. I would have been fine if it stayed under 90 with the spikes which isn't great but whatever.

You may have just gotten unlucky on the silicon lottery side of things.

There's a fairly sizable number of them that require 1.4V or so to hit 5ghz and at that point you gotta go nuts on cooling (delidding etc) to make up for all the voltage you're cranking into the chip.

Would be curious what voltage you set, or if you used some kind of automatic setting what your motherboard/software decided to throw it at it try and keep it stable.

I just did the auto for now. Not sure if that went too crazy with the voltage to keep it stable yet. It just spiked so hard that I'm not feeling good about the cooling at all. I might try going down to 4.8 or something to see if that makes a huge difference. If that put me at a max of 70, I might be okay, but if THAT still gets in the 80s, I'll probably go forward with the delid option.

Is there a compelling reason to overclock to 5Ghz at all? I never overclock.. not sure why anyone bothers these days with everything being so GPU limited.

I enjoy fiddling around with things and just want to get the most performance I can.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

I cray cray in the bray bray.

FTFY

The reason I bought this 4790K was because it had a really high stock clock (4.4GHz turbo), so I got most of the benefits of overclocking without actually having to do any.