The Some Like It HOT TAKES thread

A take so mild it actually neutralizes capsaicin. You could eat a ghost pepper while reading that take and not feel a thing.

Imgur is a more influential, and healthier, social network than FaceBook.

Most of my imgur posts get downvoted without comment and I don't know why.

What sort of posts do you make? Selfies are frowned upon.

Come to think of it the only reason I post there is so I can post images here and on Reddit. That probably explains it. The Imgur community are known to dislike Reddit for spamming Imgur with memes and content they don't understand. What's ironic is that most of them don't realise that Imgur was created to host images for Reddit.

You don't have to make every image you upload to Imgur public. I use it as a picture hosting site these days and never made my images public- you just need a direct link to use when posting the image elsewhere.

But when I did post public posts on the site the posts that got up/down voted were pretty arbitrary.

You get a feel for it after a time, if you spend time in usersub.

I agree, if you don't *mean* to post it on Imgur, just make it private. Imgur definitely has it's own culture and subcultures, it's arcane social contract, it's obvious biases and blatant dislikes. Content directly aimed at Imgur users, well-formatted and mostly tasteful, does the best. Liberal political posts do well. Selfies and pics of things to be sold or just documented, as well as stuff that is clearly not intended to entertain or inform, do very badly.

I'm not affirming any of this, it's just what I've noticed. Imgur's big things are kindness to others, kawaii, surprises, the odd and unusual, animals and pets, things people make, art, respect for others (some ignore that but you'll notice it in people with high reputations), mental health, people helping others, ongoing webcomics, wholesome posts... That sort of thing. FWIW.

If you post a reasonably detailed explanation of the development of flywheels in watches, with pictures, you'll probably get upvoted. Post a picture set of 3 different high end watches and you'll get shot to pieces.

Part hot take/part confession?

I don't *GET* Radiohead. If I had to pick a favorite album, it'd be In Rainbows, but I never actively want to listen to it. I've forced myself to listen to Ok Computer enough times so I can say I get what the fuss is about... but I really don't.

These thoughts have surfaced again because I read an NME music review of The Smile - Wall of Eyes (which has two members of Radiohead in it). This review said it was a "masterclass in pushing rock forward". I listened to the album and... it sounded like Radiohead. So... how is this pushing rock forward?

In conclusion, I believe critics like "Important" things over "entertaining" things. So much so that things that easily entertain us are often deemed to be lesser than things that are challenging because things that are difficult must be "Important!"

Kid A and Amnesiac was best Radiohead.

It's ok to not like things other people think are the nit's tits.

Yeah, I'm obsessed with Radiohead more than most (got a lot of vinyl), but it's not for everyone's taste. I don't know why my background made them a favorite band for me. I grew up with classical music and evangelical christian music so I instantly gravitated towards Radiohead when I was a teen.

I gave Radiohead a solid try years ago, listening to both those albums repeatedly. I just didn’t get it.

More recently, I gave boygenius a try. I loved Julien Baker’s first album, so I figured a ”super group“ with her and Phoebe Bridgers would appeal to me. Sadly, it did absolutely nothing for me.

I’m more of a melody person than a lyric person, and while I’m sure the lyrics from both bands are artful and poetic, there’s nothing for me to latch onto musically. I’m genuinely baffled as to what people see in Radiohead especially, but as Jonman said, that’s okay.

Fake Plastic Trees hit at the right place and time to draw me in. And then I loved pretty much everything that followed (King of Limbs not so much), even though I can't understand half of what Yorke is going on about.

I listened to OK Computer so much in high school that I somehow wore out the CD. I don't even know if that's a thing that can happen but it wouldn't play anymore and I had to buy a new one.

I don't think I've ever listened to anything that's come out since Amnesiac but everything up to that point is pretty damn good.

“No Surprises” and “Fake Plastic Trees” hit me hard as a young adult who was disenchanted with the world.

Now I hear “No Surprises” and think how lovely it sounds to have no alarms and no surprises.

EDIT: Fixed mistake

I'm of the opinion that something can be complex and challenging, and something can have an accessible, entertaining hook, and both of those are good things, and while they don't often go together, that's not because there's any particular reason they can't, and the very best art does both.

I can't say I ever particularly "got" Radiohead, but I can't say I ever sat down and gave it a serious try either. I was of the right age when Kid A and OK Computer were new, and some of my friends were super into them, but also, there are a million things to get into all the time, and you can't do them all. I was in more of a Jurassic 5 and Del tha Funkee Homo Sapien place at the time.

hbi2k wrote:

I'm of the opinion that something can be complex and challenging, and something can have an accessible, entertaining hook, and both of those are good things, and while they don't often go together, that's not because there's any particular reason they can't, and the very best art does both.

I can't say I ever particularly "got" Radiohead, but I can't say I ever sat down and gave it a serious try either. I was of the right age when Kid A and OK Computer were new, and some of my friends were super into them, but also, there are a million things to get into all the time, and you can't do them all. I was in more of a Jurassic 5 and Del tha Funkee Homo Sapien place at the time.

I was deep in my Tori Amos, Bjork, PJ Harvey phase- with Aphex Twin and Stereolab on the side- around the time OK Computer came out. I bought OK Computer and it didn't gel with me. I remember I took it with a bunch of other CDs to a used CD shop and the guy looked at me like "are you sure you want to sell back this one?" and I was like "It's not for me".

Then at some point I bought OK Computer again on CD because everyone was all about how great it was. I still didn't get it.

I had a friend that was super into them from Kid A on and I liked it fine but they were always too popular for me to seriously get into. I was young and a music snob and my interest in artists was always inversely proportional to their mainstream success.
I always check to see how many listeners a band has on streaming platforms so I guess I’m still a little bit that way but I no longer completely shun stuff for being popular.

Yeah, when it comes to music more than pretty much any other medium, enough people who have put enough more thought into it than I have act like there are levels of complexity and "importance" to be explored beyond "does this sound nice, does it make me feel a thing when I listen to it?" that I'm inclined to believe them, but I seem to lack whatever gene is necessary to appreciate music on that higher level.

Case in point, I name-dropped J5 and Del above, which were popular enough, but never quite broke through to the superstar, household-name success levels of a Jay-Z or a Dr. Dre or even a Cypress Hill, so back in the day I always thought I was at least mildly cool for knowing about them. It's since come to my attention that among "serious" hip-hop fans they're considered entry-level accessible hip-hop for clueless white people. Which is fair enough, I AM a clueless white person, I take no insult at learning that.

Anyway, lately I've been doing a deep dive through the discography of MF DOOM, who was experiencing his heyday right around that same time but I never heard of him until the last couple years (and, sadly, posthumously). And it's really really good, I'm enjoying it a lot, but my clueless white ass lacks any kind of context in which to tell you why he's considered a "good" rapper by "serious" hip-hop heads but J5 and Del are not.

But that's fine, I'll take the word of people who know more than I do and continue enjoying music on the one basic-Female Doggo level I'm apparently capable of. (-:

hbi2k wrote:

Anyway, lately I've been doing a deep dive through the discography of MF DOOM, who was experiencing his heyday right around that same time but I never heard of him until the last couple years (and, sadly, posthumously). And it's really really good, I'm enjoying it a lot, but my clueless white ass lacks any kind of context in which to tell you why he's considered a "good" rapper by "serious" hip-hop heads but J5 and Del are not.

There’s a couple things going on with DOOM but he’s generally considered one of the best mostly because of the complexity and density of his rhymes, if you map out his bars he does some absolutely crazy rhyme schemes that are a bit more common now but just weren’t being done back in the day.
I like J5 and Del fine but their stuff is much more straightforward.

This is the best Radiohead performance, at least vocally. Everything is better with Brahms. There was a recording on YT of a Colorado symphony performing the same arrangement that was a better balance with a better orchestral sound, but it’s been privated.

Pre-ground coffee in a drip coffee maker is good enough considering all the extra time and effort it takes to make a marginally better cup.

compared to what? Any type of coffee doesn’t require much time and effort.

Finding out that electric kettles and to a lesser degree instant coffee aren't really a thing in the US was mind blowing to me. The simplest way to get your caffeine fix by far.

instant coffee is pretty common in certain areas, I grew up in a rural area where it was basically the only coffee anyone drank, but in local grocery stores here it’s relegated to like a single shelf among an entire aisle of bulk and bagged coffee beans

We've had electric kettles for decades. So have many of our friends. This seems like one of things that go around, but it's not really like that at all here.

Instant coffee, well, you can get it anywhere, but people associate it with hotels and workplaces lol. Not what you use when you want to make a decent cup of coffee. But easily available.

Yeah, the thing about America and electric kettles is that you won't find one in every single kitchen you walk into across the entire flipping country, like you do in civilized countries like Australia and the UK.

They're definitely a thing here, they're not ubiquitous.

As for instant coffee, it's totally a thing, it's just a different thing that you buy "instantly" from either (a) an underpaid person in a Starbucks or (b) an underpaid young woman wearing lingerie in a shed.

Spoiler:

Option B is probably localized to the PNW? I've no idea of the history that meant we have a cottage industry that lives at the intersection of starbucks and a drive-thru strip club, but we do.

I would say the “instant” version of coffee here would be either pour-over or french press, nearly everyone I know has either an actual french press maker or an aeropress. Cold-brewed concentrate is also popular.

Also, the voltage for kettles in the US is lower than the UK, so they do take longer to boil