[News] Post a D&D Picture

Previous incarnations of Cleveland/P&C/D&D have had an image thread, to handle political cartoons and other image-based stuff that doesn't belong in the general post-a-picture threads.

If any of them spawn an extended discussion, please spawn it off into its own thread. Replies to non-picture replies should take the form of a link pointing to a post on a different discussion thread.

And I shouldn't have to say it, but the images still need to abide by the rules.

ruhk wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.postimg.cc/zvGxkJsZ/DEE376-C2-D0-F9-4502-B089-B40-E09905698.jpg)

unfortunately whoever made this cut off the name of the person who wrote this, because they definitely deserve credit.

It was before I deleted all my social media, but I believe it was [email protected] on Mastodon that coined the phrase.

Honestly, that seems more like something a Russian Troll farm would amplify.

Fear of a few Russians being on the internet seems like something a Russian troll farm would amplify.

IMAGE(https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/64325358_10220288437029907_6216388089154109440_o.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_oc=AQmI08Sgs3rNE0_VW7ITS8uQRLlFCXebwyd22DE8kXsW6GIuJx56A0fDBWkz1Vca7qT90XeG1b-DCPQ9FEevFx9j&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&oh=d9835450a749391b9a6df0b16b390ee4&oe=5D85D8D4)

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/qVOEM8H.jpg)

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/7D8U36t.jpg)

FOX has done to our parents what our parents thought video games would do to us.

F'ing brilliant

I hate these kinds of comparisons, but right now there's a full on conflagration happening over whether or not the migrant camps are "concentration camps".

This image really struck me.

IMAGE(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D9W_JIJUYAA-he1.jpg)

It's a poorly thought-out image. Reductio ad absurdium in image form

Things don't progress at the same speed nearly a century apart, nor should they.

I agree. Like I said, I don't like these comparisons either and history never literally repeats itself. But I think it's important perspective that death camps didn't literally start out as death camps from the start.

There's a long history to concentration camps that we'd do good to remember. They don't ever start out as the death camps we think of when we hear the term "concentration camps". But they always lead to the misery or death of innocent people.

yeah if anything we're beating the pants off Hitler, we already have camps!

Hobear wrote:

yeah if anything we're beating the pants off Hitler, we already have camps!

nah we are right on track.

The first camp in Germany, Dachau, was founded in March 1933.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/xjN1OtB.png)

IMAGE(https://media.tenor.com/images/793184b1a553185dd24ee1f859a8c1a2/tenor.gif)

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/wrA12Dc.png)

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I laughed, but only to stop myself from sobbing into my coffee.

Fun fact: of the two nuclear bombs that were accidentally dropped on North Carolina, one of them was only partially recovered. The secondary core is still there, buried somewhere deep beneath a farm field.

IMAGE(https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/65305696_10157197188634043_2897030053323866112_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_oc=AQkN-il0Da90Sj2mLdP58eL9eRui-PCDjL8Va_tuOd1nruzTdqqTQBuKMTNB38C6XuU&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=89f229854d8da24a6cee7062da6b246a&oe=5D824207)

Gremlin wrote:

Fun fact: of the two nuclear bombs that were accidentally dropped on North Carolina, one of them was only partially recovered. The secondary core is still there, buried somewhere deep beneath a farm field.

I like how "accidentally dropped" is a euphemism for "the plane broke up". Similarly, a mid-air collision resulted in a lost bomb around Tybee Island, Georgia, a few years earlier.

deftly wrote:
Gremlin wrote:

Fun fact: of the two nuclear bombs that were accidentally dropped on North Carolina, one of them was only partially recovered. The secondary core is still there, buried somewhere deep beneath a farm field.

I like how "accidentally dropped" is a euphemism for "the plane broke up". Similarly, a mid-air collision resulted in a lost bomb around Tybee Island, Georgia, a few years earlier.

I understand is it was less a farm field and more one of the bogs the form in low areas in eastern North Carolina, and it wasn't recovered because they were never able to pinpoint the precise point of impact for the bombs because wet boggy soil fills back in craters and such.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/InzMhNS.png)

Unpopular opinion: temperature is the one place where imperial is more useful than metric. For science metric makes more sense, but for casual usage we basically only use temperature in recipes and for talking about weather, and in those contexts it's more useful to have a scale where conveniently round numbers cover a wider range.

That is, in Fahrenheit 0 is really cold and 100 is really hot, and you can meaningfully say things like "temperatures in the 80s". Whereas with metric one winds up saying things like "it was a pleasant 23° yesterday but today it's 32° and gosh it's hot".

fenomas wrote:

Unpopular opinion: temperature is the one place where imperial is more useful than metric. For science metric makes more sense, but for casual usage we basically only use temperature in recipes and for talking about weather, and in those contexts it's more useful to have a scale where conveniently round numbers cover a wider range.

That is, in Fahrenheit 0 is really cold and 100 is really hot, and you can meaningfully say things like "temperatures in the 80s". Whereas with metric one winds up saying things like "it was a pleasant 23° yesterday but today it's 32° and gosh it's hot".

Eh. A scale factor of 1.8 isn't worth quibbling over.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/5frxeGf.jpg)

fenomas wrote:

Unpopular opinion: temperature is the one place where imperial is more useful than metric. For science metric makes more sense, but for casual usage we basically only use temperature in recipes and for talking about weather, and in those contexts it's more useful to have a scale where conveniently round numbers cover a wider range.

That is, in Fahrenheit 0 is really cold and 100 is really hot, and you can meaningfully say things like "temperatures in the 80s". Whereas with metric one winds up saying things like "it was a pleasant 23° yesterday but today it's 32° and gosh it's hot".

Water freezing at 0°C and boiling at 100°C feels pretty useful for recipes.

Since we're having climate issues anyway, I vote we do some geoengineering and put the entire planet at a permanent -40° to settle this once and for all.

-40° F or C?

Celsius is how temperature feels for water.
Fahrenheit is how temperature feels for humans.
Kelvin is how temperature feels for atoms.

fenomas wrote:

That is, in Fahrenheit 0 is really cold and 100 is really hot, and you can meaningfully say things like "temperatures in the 80s". Whereas with metric one winds up saying things like "it was a pleasant 23° yesterday but today it's 32° and gosh it's hot".

This is the strangest "normalization of behaviour I find normal" I've seen in a while. Because, watch:
"temperatures in the low 20s". Tada!

I promise, knowing that 20-25 is comfortable with pants on and 25-30 will require shorts is no more difficult or strange than whatever the big-number equivalents are.

Why don't we just come up with decigrees or centigrees for more useful day-to-day usage? We already do that crap with calling kilocalories Calories with a capital C. We can call them Degrees. And use a deodorant stick as the symbol.

Lent wrote:

-40° F or C?

Yes.

Lent wrote:

-40° F or C?

first one, and then the other.