Gamers who play musical instruments

RawkGWJ wrote:

Podunk,

That was excellent! I was thrown off at first because you look nothing like your avatar photo.

Thanks!

I mean, I think I look a little like that photo...

Podunk wrote:

I've been spending the last month or so syncing, mixing and editing virtual performances for my college's music department. The first one was a "directors night" show, which meant that my wife and I had to scramble to come up with something to present. One of the pieces we slammed together was this quick arrangement of Time after Time. This is (I think) the first time in maybe 2 decades that I have intentionally filmed myself playing/singing for any kind of organized presentation - I was nervous about it, but I thought it came out reasonably well. Hope you enjoy

Jebus.. Crazy good as usual.

Ranger Rick,

I really don't like coffee at all, but I do like that!

Podunk,

You and your wife were great. Awesome sound and everything all harmonized!

I’ve been working on eliminating the vibrato when I sing. The results have been encouraging. At some point I realized that I was doing a thing that bothers me when I hear other singers do it; over use of vibrato. Part of why I was doing it was nervousness. I’ve been working on relaxing while singing, and trying to feel more grounded. I just recorded something where I wanted to double my vocal. With hardly any vibrato, the doubling sounded much better.

You know how practicing an instrument (or anything really) is a series of plateaus and small inclines and sharp inclines (and declines) and sometimes outright freefall with a bunch of glides and air lifts and all sorts of other things?

Well this past week I think a large bird swooped down and carried me up for a bit because I have suddenly made a great deal of progress/improvement in some things I've been working on!

This is a really cool pentatonic scale video with a shape structure I have not seen before and have been having fun with.

Because the 3 highest strings of a ukelele are tuned to the same intervals as a guitar (3rd, 4th) the pattern works on that, too. No idea how a banjo is tuned.

Thanks for sharing that! I am having a lot of fun with it too, and have followed that dude.

The most standard tuning for a 5-string banjo is GDGBD, but the thing about banjo is that it is also very typical to tune it in a bunch of different ways depending on the style of music and experienced banjo players are very capable of tuning to whatever is needed on the fly, and even sometimes using tuning as part of the music as in Earl's Breakdown.

Here are some examples of the ways a 5-string banjo is tuned and is by no means a complete list.

https://www.deeringbanjos.com/pages/...

The DGB on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th strings is what I believe standard on guitar, so this trick for the triangle shape might could work on 5-string banjo without making any tuning adjustments from the typical G tuning, at least on those strings. The G on the first string could be tuned up to A, but need to be careful of putting too much strain on the strings/neck. The usual thing if playing a 5-string banjo in the key of A is to just use a capo to avoid that potential issue, but since in this case it would only be the one string, it may not be much of an issue.

Banjo tunings are interesting and many banjos have difficulty staying in tune because the bridge isn't fastened to the head in any way. If all the strings were removed at once, there would be nothing holding the bridge to the head.

Someone with far more banjo experience than me may have better input, but that's my current understanding when it comes to tunings!

Standard guitar tuning is EADGBe (low to high), and the shape in the video is on the three high strings. So if you tuned your high D up to an E, it should work exactly the same.

Mixolyde wrote:

Standard guitar tuning is EADGBe (low to high), and the shape in the video is on the three high strings. So if you tuned your high D up to an E, it should work exactly the same.

I think that's actually what I might have meant, but that's what having no sleep does to a person!

My Christmas present arrived! It was backordered for quite a while but finally got here. Relatively inexpensive bass, Ibanez GSR205, since I'm no bassist. But man, do I dig it. Perfect for my needs. Do I wish I had a giant 8x10 stack to rattle the house neighborhood? Yep. But my Headrush 112 does fine with providing some pleasing rumble.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/q8FtNrb.jpg)

That's gorgeous. My first test riff would probably be Seven Nation Army.

Mixolyde wrote:

That's gorgeous. My first test riff would probably be Seven Nation Army.

I freely admit my first song was Master of Puppets.

I was once told the greatest way to insult a bassist was to ask them if they could play the “Barney Miller” theme song, so that should be the first riff in my book...I might be dating myself though.

ColdForged, what's that guitar at the top left? It looks suspiciously similar to a guitar I was just recently looking at, a PRS SE Mark Holcomb. It has showed up in some lists as a very good guitar, especially for metal. I'm in the market for a new guitar, but it's unfortunately a bit over my price range though. Thinking about going Ibanez, but we'll see.

d4m0 wrote:

ColdForged, what's that guitar at the top left? It looks suspiciously similar to a guitar I was just recently looking at, a PRS SE Mark Holcomb. It has showed up in some lists as a very good guitar, especially for metal. I'm in the market for a new guitar, but it's unfortunately a bit over my price range though. Thinking about going Ibanez, but we'll see.

I wish it was a PRS SE Mark Holcomb! It is, however, my Ibanez S540BM from way back in '94 with bridge and neck pickups swapped for Seymour Duncans. Of course, I think I actually paid more for it back then than the PRS costs :|... but my memory may be faulty.

In the spirit of the new year, I decided to actually sit down and figure out this whole "4th, 7th, diminished 13th" stuff on the theory side of things. I want to spend this year (or how ever long it takes) until I can understand this whole music theory thing. With that in mind, I went looking for some tools and I found two things that really work for me when it comes to learning this:

1. A book called "The guitar cook book". No other book has so simply laid out what all the intervals are, and how to find them, as well and as easy as this book does. I had to order it from France, but it wasn't expensive and I just had to wait a bit for it to get here. After 5 pages I now have a clear understanding of how to figure where the 3rd, diminished 7th, 6th and 13th, etc etc, is on the fretboard. Highly, highly recommended.

2. To practice all this I found an app called "Solo" (link to youtube video) made by Tom Quayle. It listens to your playing while prompting you to find 3rd, 5th, 7th from a root and once you have found the right note, it moves on to the next one. So for example: You ask the app to listen for 3rd and 5th's in the key of C. The app then shows a big C and under it 1, 3, 5. You have to play the notes in ascending or descending, OR random, order which forces the muscle memory of where those notes are in relation to the root.

Wish me luck! After two weeks of using these two things for about 30 minutes / day I can finally see how scales and chords are actually constructed. I have a long way to go, but after 30 years of just f*cking around playing guitar I figured it was time to actually understand it.

That's one advantage I had starting off with classical piano as a small child. I had music theory lessons right alongside all of the other stuff. My deficiency is in ear training. While I can recognize intervals and pick out a tune, I am not at all capable of just hearing a complex piece of music and figuring out how to play all the notes and chords by ear.

Fredrik_S wrote:

2. To practice all this I found an app called "Solo" (link to youtube video) made by Tom Quayle. It listens to your playing while prompting you to find 3rd, 5th, 7th from a root and once you have found the right note, it moves on to the next one. So for example: You ask the app to listen for 3rd and 5th's in the key of C. The app then shows a big C and under it 1, 3, 5. You have to play the notes in ascending or descending, OR random, order which forces the muscle memory of where those notes are in relation to the root.

Wish me luck! After two weeks of using these two things for about 30 minutes / day I can finally see how scales and chords are actually constructed. I have a long way to go, but after 30 years of just f*cking around playing guitar I figured it was time to actually understand it.

Dude! That’s rad. I’m going to check out that app. I definitely need to bone up on chords and extensions.

bekkilyn wrote:

While I can recognize intervals and pick out a tune, I am not at all capable of just hearing a complex piece of music and figuring out how to play all the notes and chords by ear.

That’s actually REALLY hard to do. Most people, like me, stumble through the process at a snails pace. My former teacher makes it look easy, but he’s damn near a genius level musician. It really was worth the price of the lesson just to watch him work out problems that would have taken me forever in just a few minutes.

I reached out to him on FB recently to thank him for all he taught me. The plague is hitting him in the pocket book pretty heavily. It’s a shame.

ColdForged wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

That's gorgeous. My first test riff would probably be Seven Nation Army.

I freely admit my first song was Master of Puppets. :D

Oooooooh, Whereever I May Roam would have been my Metallica pull.

Fredrik_S wrote:

Wish me luck! After two weeks of using these two things for about 30 minutes / day I can finally see how scales and chords are actually constructed. I have a long way to go, but after 30 years of just f*cking around playing guitar I figured it was time to actually understand it.

I do wish you luck and assure you that you can do it. I've been taking lessons now for a bit over a year -- after 34 years of guitar ownership -- and had the same kind of thing in mind. I do weekly Skype lessons for an hour, half on theory, half on playing. There were a couple of pain points theory-wise, but now I'm getting there. So talking about the intervals in the suspended second of the 7th degree of A harmonic minor and the construction of the ensuing G# sus♭2♭5 triad is no longer just pure mumbo jumbo :D.

From my artist Twitter:

RaccoonFink wrote:

Me, for 20+ years: I should make more music.
Me, since joining @TheSeaGarages
: Sure I write instrumental music but how about some lyrics? And maybe I should use my ukulele. Wait now I'll write a shanty! WHAT IF I PICKED UP TRUMPET AGAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE HIGH SCHOOL.

IMAGE(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ErtiLJUXEA0KXHg?format=jpg&name=medium)

Am actually thinking of trying it. The reviews on this adorable trumpet that comes in lots of fun colors are actually pretty good, as long as you replace the mouthpiece and the springs on the spit valve.

My biggest reason I hadn't played trumpet is it's not much fun by yourself. But the Garages have a whole ska album and have (online) live gigs coming up and I'd really love to join in.

Also, our latest release comes out tomorrow, it's up for preorder right now. It's a combination of original songs and covers of existing Garages songs done in various 80s styles. I made an Erasure-style version of Garages Forever, a song that was originally just voice and ukulele.

Anyone have any experience with MIDI expression controllers? I am thinking of picking up a midi expression pedal so I can use the wah in my guitar amp sims, but I can't seem to find one that is simple to plug and play and just works.

Here's what I'm looking for: A expression pedal that has a midi out that can go directly into my presonus Audiobox interface. The back of the interface has a DIM MIDI port (in and out):
IMAGE(https://pae-web.presonusmusic.com/uploads/products/media/images/audiobox_itwo-back_big.jpg)

I would like something like the Nectar, but with a MIDI connection:
IMAGE(https://media.sweetwater.com/api/i/q-82__ha-ef655607542cd44b__hmac-70bdaa6a55c9b35ccf21ced9c4e8307e5f330ec7/images/items/750/NX-P-large.jpg)

But all that I find doesn't have a MIDI connection (most seem to use the standard TS connections (standard guitar cable) OR they are full scale 10 button pedal boards for stage use. Anyone know how to do this without breaking the bank or having a useless giant footboard under the desk?

Edit: found this that might work: https://www.audiofront.net/MIDIExpre...

I have been messing around with some jam band songs for the eventual return of warm weather and my gazebo jam band (Grateful Dead, Dave Matthews Band, etc), and discovered that the chords for Blues Traveler's Hook (the hook brings you back/I ain't tellin' you no lie) is basically Pachabel's Canon, but in A with some blues flair.
A E F#m7 C#7 D A D E.
Super fun to play the main riff, but I am still trying to figure out how to best improvise a solo that sounds like his harmonica one, but a lot simpler.

Also, Friend of the Devil is a really good jam song.

Mixolyde wrote:

I have been messing around with some jam band songs for the eventual return of warm weather and my gazebo jam band (Grateful Dead, Dave Matthews Band, etc), and discovered that the chords for Blues Traveler's Hook (the hook brings you back/I ain't tellin' you no lie) is basically Pachabel's Canon, but in A with some blues flair.
A E F#m7 C#7 D A D E.
Super fun to play the main riff, but I am still trying to figure out how to best improvise a solo that sounds like his harmonica one, but a lot simpler.

Also, Friend of the Devil is a really good jam song.

Jam bands. Blues traveler. Hook. Phish.

There is a Blues Traveler song that I love. It’s a Christmas song. It’s one part Hook and one part Phish.

BRB. Need to remember which songs.

Also. Can I please come to your gazebo when the plague is over?

edit 1: here’s the BT Christmas song

edit 2: Phish’s The Divided Sky is the song which is heavily referenced in the BT song.

In the Phish song skip to 4:20 in (ironically) where the musical theme begins, and at 5:00 where it follows in earnest.

In the BT song skip to 2:25 in. That’s where the Phish melody is incorporated.

Anyway. Just one of my nerdy musical obsessions. I love both songs and I love that BT would heavily reference one of my favorite Phish songs.

BTW: that Phish song, The Divided Sky is one of my most favorite compositions ever!! It’s such a great example of a modern classical composition played by a rock ensemble. It’s so great, it brings me to tears.

Right now the entirety of my Phish knowledge is: a jam band for potheads, the punchline to a joke about potheads, and 4 minute songs with 20 minute solos...for potheads. I am not now, nor have I ever been a pothead, but I am also too old to care about such labels and just want to find fun, easy songs to jam with. So I am looking forward to listening to both of these.

Also, the gazebo is in Northern Virginia, just outside DC, and you are welcome anytime. Although our schedule is very erratic and is basically us texting each other with, "looks nice outside, you free?" and then we bring drinks and snacks out and chill. Neighbors bring blankets and chill on the grass like a little lawn show. I love it.

Pot does not jive with my brain chemistry, but I’ve been to a few Phish shows, and I’ve admired their music for a long time. When they play live it absolutely can be 20 minutes of guitar solo jammed into the middle of a 4 minute song. (huh huh jammed) but in a good way?.?

Most of my favorite Phish songs are from back in the day. It’s my opinion that their newer records don’t have the same fire and innovation as the older stuff.