[Discussion] The Donald Trump Administration

Let's follow and discuss what our newest presidential administration gets up to, the good, the bad, the lawsuits.

JC wrote:

Oh great, another "avenge my father" presidency...

The Donald Trump transition, already off to slow start, bogged down further Tuesday with the abrupt resignation of former Congressman Mike Rogers, who had been coordinating its national security efforts.

The purge indicates the emphasis on loyalty -- and significant influence of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka -- that characterized Trump's campaign will carry over into his White House.

Multiple sources indicated that Christie was demoted because he wasn't seen as sufficiently loyal to Trump, failing to vocally defend him at key moments on the campaign trail.

But he has long been in a precarious position with Trump, due in part, multiple sources say, to a longstanding grudge sparked when Christie prosecuted Kushner's father in 2004. Due to Christie's investigation, Charles Kushner eventually pleaded guilty to 18 felony counts, including tax fraud and witness tampering, and was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

Well, I'm super glad we're draining the swamp so things won't get so bogged down by people with deep ties to The Establishment.

Seriously, the number of times I've heard the word "loyalty" come up since he won have me absolutely terrified.

Chaz wrote:
JC wrote:

Oh great, another "avenge my father" presidency...

The Donald Trump transition, already off to slow start, bogged down further Tuesday with the abrupt resignation of former Congressman Mike Rogers, who had been coordinating its national security efforts.

The purge indicates the emphasis on loyalty -- and significant influence of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka -- that characterized Trump's campaign will carry over into his White House.

Multiple sources indicated that Christie was demoted because he wasn't seen as sufficiently loyal to Trump, failing to vocally defend him at key moments on the campaign trail.

But he has long been in a precarious position with Trump, due in part, multiple sources say, to a longstanding grudge sparked when Christie prosecuted Kushner's father in 2004. Due to Christie's investigation, Charles Kushner eventually pleaded guilty to 18 felony counts, including tax fraud and witness tampering, and was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

Well, I'm super glad we're draining the swamp so things won't get so bogged down by people with deep ties to The Establishment.

Seriously, the number of times I've heard the word "loyalty" come up since he won have me absolutely terrified.

It's always folks like this that are obsessed with loyalty.

IMAGE(https://causticsodapodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/stalin.jpg)

JC wrote:

Oh great, another "avenge my father" presidency...

The Donald Trump transition, already off to slow start, bogged down further Tuesday with the abrupt resignation of former Congressman Mike Rogers, who had been coordinating its national security efforts.

The purge indicates the emphasis on loyalty -- and significant influence of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka -- that characterized Trump's campaign will carry over into his White House.

Multiple sources indicated that Christie was demoted because he wasn't seen as sufficiently loyal to Trump, failing to vocally defend him at key moments on the campaign trail.

But he has long been in a precarious position with Trump, due in part, multiple sources say, to a longstanding grudge sparked when Christie prosecuted Kushner's father in 2004. Due to Christie's investigation, Charles Kushner eventually pleaded guilty to 18 felony counts, including tax fraud and witness tampering, and was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

2 years for 18 felony counts seems almost hilariously low.

NathanialG wrote:
JC wrote:

Oh great, another "avenge my father" presidency...

The Donald Trump transition, already off to slow start, bogged down further Tuesday with the abrupt resignation of former Congressman Mike Rogers, who had been coordinating its national security efforts.

The purge indicates the emphasis on loyalty -- and significant influence of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka -- that characterized Trump's campaign will carry over into his White House.

Multiple sources indicated that Christie was demoted because he wasn't seen as sufficiently loyal to Trump, failing to vocally defend him at key moments on the campaign trail.

But he has long been in a precarious position with Trump, due in part, multiple sources say, to a longstanding grudge sparked when Christie prosecuted Kushner's father in 2004. Due to Christie's investigation, Charles Kushner eventually pleaded guilty to 18 felony counts, including tax fraud and witness tampering, and was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

2 years for 18 felony counts seems almost hilariously low.

And what a fine fellow his father was...

Mr. Kushner, 50, built a construction business begun by his father into a private real estate empire that owned more than 25,000 apartments, millions of square feet of commercial and industrial space and thousands of acres of developable land.

But Mr. Kushner also became embroiled in a bitter family feud over the business and how proceeds were distributed. That dispute, plus his growing prominence as a political financier, helped lead to his downfall. The intrafamily acrimony was such that Mr. Kushner retaliated against his brother-in-law, who was cooperating with federal authorities, by hiring a prostitute to seduce him. He then arranged to have a secretly recorded videotape of the encounter sent to his sister, the man's wife.

Just good, salt of the earth people, they are.

NathanialG wrote:
JC wrote:

Oh great, another "avenge my father" presidency...

The Donald Trump transition, already off to slow start, bogged down further Tuesday with the abrupt resignation of former Congressman Mike Rogers, who had been coordinating its national security efforts.

The purge indicates the emphasis on loyalty -- and significant influence of Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, husband of Ivanka -- that characterized Trump's campaign will carry over into his White House.

Multiple sources indicated that Christie was demoted because he wasn't seen as sufficiently loyal to Trump, failing to vocally defend him at key moments on the campaign trail.

But he has long been in a precarious position with Trump, due in part, multiple sources say, to a longstanding grudge sparked when Christie prosecuted Kushner's father in 2004. Due to Christie's investigation, Charles Kushner eventually pleaded guilty to 18 felony counts, including tax fraud and witness tampering, and was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

2 years for 18 felony counts seems almost hilariously low.

Not for a rich white guy.

As if we needed any more data that we are screwed.

Not to worry, Trump suggested in a Tuesday night tweet: "Very organized process taking place as I decide on Cabinet and many other positions. I am the only one who knows who the finalists are!"

This is not a f*cking reality show you twat.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/AxGzoSDl.jpg)

You want to know the sad thing? That even as disorganized as they are, the administration will be able to implement some of the really terrible things that Trump has promised. Heck, some of the parts will be worse with an incompetent dictator. Why bother to gut the EPA when you can just neglect to staff it?

With all the intrigue that is happening even before he takes residence, the next four years is going to be like watching reruns of that 80's show Dallas.

He also wants to assure us that he's not seeking security clearances for his kids. Plus mentioning in three different tweets how terrible the NY Times is.

Given how much he likes to go after them on Twitter, I fully expect them to be the first target of the likely media crackdown that's coming. Makes me want to subscribe to them in some form or other even more.

Just re-establish the fairness doctrine but only applied to print newspapers and their subsidiaries, seems reasonable!

Honestly, I already did subscribe. We are getting the Fri-Sun subscription and digital access. We used to get the Sunday Times years ago, which Teresa loved, so this felt like as good a time as any to invest in Democracy.

I'm also getting the StL Post-Dispatch digital, which just gives access to some columnist and other paywalled content.

Freedom of the Press is not free. If we value a strong press that is willing to investigate our government, we need to invest in it.

After watching Spotlight, it's something I've been thinking about more, that the net really is destroying an institution that is really responsible for making the country as great as it was. I don't think taxes are the answer, but we need people to willingly support the nations newspapers like we used to.

Maybe Trump's threats can motivate us. This isn't a good time to let a fascist dictate where we get our news.

The frustrating and terrifying thing is that Trump has proven his ability to simply lie and say "I never said that."

Even if it is on tape for the world to see....

He can basically do anything he wants and hand wave it away and people will accept it.

I think we are going to see a ton of batsh*t insane things suggested and then when questioned the answer will be, "I never said or did that. "

Funnily enough the NYT was very quick to step into line after the election. By continuing to attack them he's creating his own opposition.

Personally I'd go for the Washington Post before the NYT, but would support The Globe and Mail, New Yorker or New Republic. f*ck Teen Vogue has had really good coverage.

It truly is a post-factual era. People didn't trust Hillary so they voted for a man that lies so often it is impossible to track. We'll, them and those people that recognized Trump as unfit, but voted third party so they could protect unborn babies and establishment Republicans, but I doubt they will own Trump.

Paleocon wrote:

With all the intrigue that is happening even before he takes residence, the next four years is going to be like watching reruns of that 80's show Dallas.

I don't expect him to last the full 4 years. My guess is that he'll get sick of the whole thing and give up (with a made-up excuse like "bone spurs") or he'll get removed from office. He may not even need to make up an excuse, the dude is 70 and has not treated his body well.

MrDeVil909 wrote:

Funnily enough the NYT was very quick to step into line after the election. By continuing to attack them he's creating his own opposition.

Personally I'd go for the Washington Post before the NYT, but would support The Globe and Mail, New Yorker or New Republic. f*ck Teen Vogue has had really good coverage.

My local paper subscription included 52 weeks of the Washington Post. But the Times is really the paper of record for the country, and it is still the greatest newspaper published in the world, in my opinion.

As an appellate attorney, my wife is obsessed with clarity and precision in writing, and the Times is the only paper that she can read without bitching about poor writing. It really is editing that makes great writing, and that is what we are losing with downfall of print journalism. I gave no problem patronizing a newspaper that still invests in editorship.

Jayhawker wrote:

It truly is a post-factual era. People didn't trust Hillary so they voted for a man that lies so often it is impossible to track. We'll, them and those people that recognized Trump as unfit, but voted third party so they could protect unborn babies and establishment Republicans, but I doubt they will own Trump.

'Post-truth' declared word of the year by Oxford Dictionaries

Jayhawker wrote:

We'll, them and those people that recognized Trump as unfit, but voted third party so they could protect unborn babies and establishment Republicans, but I doubt they will own Trump.

Correct.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

With all the intrigue that is happening even before he takes residence, the next four years is going to be like watching reruns of that 80's show Dallas.

I don't expect him to last the full 4 years. My guess is that he'll get sick of the whole thing and give up (with a made-up excuse like "bone spurs") or he'll get removed from office. He may not even need to make up an excuse, the dude is 70 and has not treated his body well.

Yeah, he's going to pull a Palin and quit. That's been my wife's prediction, and it makes sense.

Jayhawker wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

With all the intrigue that is happening even before he takes residence, the next four years is going to be like watching reruns of that 80's show Dallas.

I don't expect him to last the full 4 years. My guess is that he'll get sick of the whole thing and give up (with a made-up excuse like "bone spurs") or he'll get removed from office. He may not even need to make up an excuse, the dude is 70 and has not treated his body well.

Yeah, he's going to pull a Palin and quit. That's been my wife's prediction, and it makes sense.

Careful what you wish for. A President Pence would be less attention seeking and far, far worse.

In actuality, and hear me out on this, a President Trump may well be a blessing in disguise.

National parties rarely spend much time in the wilderness. They usually bounce back pretty aggressively in the midterms irrespective of the performance of the executive. And by most reasonable assessments a Trump presidency is likely to be deeply polarizing and energizing to those opposed to his agenda.

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity, they are poised to retake the House and Senate for the first time in forever. And control over the legislative agenda is likely to be FAR more useful and far reaching in scope than residency in the Oval Office. Combine that with a scandal ridden, ineffective chief executive and (should we survive the international repercussions), the progress one is likely to see on issues like Climate Change, Civil/human rights, and living wages is likely to be a "make up" session for the last 8 years of stalling.

The crazies and racists have passed our guard. Now shrimp out and sweep to mount.

Paleocon wrote:

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity

This is what has me concerned. There's nothing Dems are better at than squandering opportunities.

Paleocon wrote:

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity, they are poised to retake the House and Senate for the first time in forever. And control over the legislative agenda is likely to be FAR more useful and far reaching in scope than residency in the Oval Office.

It would be extremely difficult for the Senate to flip in 2018 in my opinion, there are 23 democratic seats up compared to only 8 on the right.

Demyx wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity

This is what has me concerned. There's nothing Dems are better at than squandering opportunities.

Democrats - Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory since forever.

The sad part is that their tendency toward big tent, let's at least try and compromise is what I like about them, and is exactly the thing that gives them a hard time against the GOP's laser-focused "our way or the highway" approach.

NormanTheIntern wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity, they are poised to retake the House and Senate for the first time in forever. And control over the legislative agenda is likely to be FAR more useful and far reaching in scope than residency in the Oval Office.

It would be extremely difficult for the Senate to flip in 2018 in my opinion, there are 23 democratic seats up compared to only 8 on the right.

The Democrats will lose seats in 2018, not gain them. It's going to get worse before there's a real chance for it to get better.

Paleocon wrote:
Jayhawker wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

With all the intrigue that is happening even before he takes residence, the next four years is going to be like watching reruns of that 80's show Dallas.

I don't expect him to last the full 4 years. My guess is that he'll get sick of the whole thing and give up (with a made-up excuse like "bone spurs") or he'll get removed from office. He may not even need to make up an excuse, the dude is 70 and has not treated his body well.

Yeah, he's going to pull a Palin and quit. That's been my wife's prediction, and it makes sense.

Careful what you wish for. A President Pence would be less attention seeking and far, far worse.

Definitely not wishing. I think the Republicans are wishing for that, for exactly the reasons you stated.

If Trump goes, I'm wishing for an impeachment. The Republicans still get their guy, Pence, in the White house, the brand is far more damaged.

And this is what a strong press is needed for. No one is going to impeach Trump unless his scandals gets enough attention. He's already trying to discredit the media to prevent that.

And to add on to what I was saying about paying for our Freedom of the Press. It's a value to subscribe to the local paper even if you never read it. While it would be better to be informed, at the very least, your money goes to supporting local investigative journalism. The same goes for a national paper. If you are paying for a paper, maybe out of these core cutting funds, you are supporting the press, giving them the resources they need to be a true watchdog.

Even if you don't read about the scandal, when stuff hits the newspaper, it leads to change. So even if though I don't need the paywalled content on StLToday.com, that money is still a small part of keeping local politics honest.

Farscry wrote:
NormanTheIntern wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Should the Dems not squander this opportunity, they are poised to retake the House and Senate for the first time in forever. And control over the legislative agenda is likely to be FAR more useful and far reaching in scope than residency in the Oval Office.

It would be extremely difficult for the Senate to flip in 2018 in my opinion, there are 23 democratic seats up compared to only 8 on the right.

The Democrats will lose seats in 2018, not gain them. It's going to get worse before there's a real chance for it to get better.

It's not an absolute. It will be difficult not to lose seats, and near impossible to flip the senate. But it can be done if left stops protesting long enough to focus on something besides presidential politics. hopefully Trump will inspire actual voter turnout in two years.

If not, we deserve what we get. Then we can wait two more years for the people who proudly support third party candidates to come back out and shame us for not fixing the system yet, and then cast another meaningless vote.

Paleocon wrote:

Careful what you wish for. A President Pence would be less attention seeking and far, far worse.

It's not what I'm wishing for, just what I'm predicting.

Depending on how Trump goes out, Pence and the GOP could be facing a lot of populist anger.

I told conservatives to work for Trump. One talk with his team changed my mind.

I am a national security Never-Trumper who, after the election, made the case that young conservatives should volunteer to serve in the new administration, warily, their undated letters of resignation ready. That advice, I have concluded, was wrong.