[Discussion] Post-Election Optimistic Hope-All

This thread is for positive posts for how we'll get by after the 2016 US election. Articles about how we've been through worse and survived, analysis that points to there being a way forward, maybe even distractions.

Gunning for Paul Ryan's seat.

Normally I'd be satisfied with the close result of this race, but Ossoff did slightly worse last night than he did back in April. A much higher turnout and national attention actually benefited the Republicans. Trump is officially under investigation for ties with Russia and the Republicans got a small boost.

Djinn wrote:

Normally I'd be satisfied with the close result of this race, but Ossoff did slightly worse last night than he did back in April. A much higher turnout and national attention actually benefited the Republicans. Trump is officially under investigation for ties with Russia and the Republicans got a small boost.

Yep. The GOP is Trump's party. American conservatism is Trumpism.

I heard a range of excuses as to why my work colleagues couldn't vote for Ossoff but it mostly came down to tribalism. They will hold their nose for anything with an R next to it and the level of hate for the other side is so deeply ingrained that nothing seems to sway them. It is weird at times because these are smart and decent people.

Smart and decent people frequently give their approval to awful things done on their behalf with their money.

DSGamer wrote:

Smart and decent people frequently give their approval to awful things done on their behalf with their money.

Thanks Citizens United!

Despite all of the "Bad Hombres" rhetoric during the campaign, arrest and deportations are down, and DACA applications and renewals are still being approved.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politi...

Trophy Husband wrote:

Despite all of the "Bad Hombres" rhetoric during the campaign, arrest and deportations are down, and DACA applications and renewals are still being approved.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politi...

Arrests are up 38% from 2016 and arrests of non-bad hombres--people whose only crime is living here illegally--has shot up 150%.

Deportations are down slightly but that's because deportation numbers include people stopped at the border and there's been a large decrease in the number of people trying to cross over into America.

OG_slinger wrote:
Trophy Husband wrote:

Despite all of the "Bad Hombres" rhetoric during the campaign, arrest and deportations are down, and DACA applications and renewals are still being approved.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politi...

Arrests are up 38% from 2016 and arrests of non-bad hombres--people whose only crime is living here illegally--has shot up 150%.

Deportations are down slightly but that's because deportation numbers include people stopped at the border and there's been a large decrease in the number of people trying to cross over into America.

Well, overall arrests are down, but if we're only looking at non-border arrests in the first 100 days, and compare it only to the same time period last year, then yes non-border arrests are up 38%. But you'd be ignoring the fact that 2016 saw the fewest non-border arrests than any other year of Obama's term.

Trump is on track for 153,030 non-border arrests this year, which in fairness is higher than Obama's 121,380 in 2016, but it's nowhere near his high of 350,000 in 2011, as the article you cited points out. If we're going to compare we should probably look at the entire body of work.

Non-border arrests per year:
Bush = 150,835
Obama = 257,979
Trump = 153,030 If his current rate holds
Source: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/artic...

Seems pretty good, especially when you consider the DACA renewals and compare all of this to the rhetoric that was flying around before the election

Trophy Husband wrote:

Seems pretty good, especially when you consider the DACA renewals and compare all of this to the rhetoric that was flying around before the election

I guess I view the numbers differently. 25% of the immigrants getting arrested now aren't the bad hombres Trump campaigned about. They're just people trying to take care of their families.

I've been reading a lot (and seeing videos) where ICE agents tear apart families because their dad got a DUI 20 years ago or because he got flagged years ago when he made a wrong turn at Niagara Falls on a family vacation and accidentally crossed over into Canada.

On top of that we have no real idea what this is doing to immigrant communities. How many people are going well out of their way now to get into any situation where they might possibly interact with the police, whether for a simple traffic stop or trying to get out of an abusive relationship.

All of the people arrested are going into a largely privatized detention system where eight people have died so far this year. Even under Obama the immigrant detention system needed a lot of reform and some of that was started. But the Trump administration is simply rolling back those reforms and requiring private jails to follow far fewer regulations and procedures designed for the safety of the inmates.

And then there's the immigration court system, which has been chronically underfunded by a Congress unwilling to tackle immigration reform. That's resulted in a massive backlog of cases.

Worse, the immigration court system doesn't fall under the purview of the federal courts. It falls under Session's Justice Department. And that means that immigration judges are actually government lawyers hired by and reporting to Sessions.

The decrease in arrests probably explains why ICE is now going after soft targets. Got to get those numbers up somehow, grandmothers and kids are as good a way as any I guess.

Happy 4th, everyone

https://warontherocks.com/2017/07/wonder-and-worry-in-an-age-of-distraction-notes-on-american-exceptionalism-for-my-young-friends/

Closer to home, reflect upon the situation the United States found itself in the 1970s. Focusing on deliberations in Washington during that tumultuous decade, you would have found few defenders of the idea that the United States was in any way exceptional or that its future was bright. The United States had lost a tragic and geopolitically inconsequential war that had killed tens of thousands of American soldiers and maimed hundreds of thousands more while exposing deep, seemingly permanent political and socio-cultural rifts in the country. The Soviet Union appeared to be pulling ahead in the superpower struggle as the United States seemed to retreat from the world. America’s cities were in ruins (hip San Francisco was referred to as “America’s Belfast”), experiencing epidemics of drugs and crime, facing bankruptcy and depopulation, all while the nation’s culture was coarsening and the economy mired in declining growth, high unemployment, and inflation. Political leadership ranged from corrupt to incompetent and citizens had lost faith in governing institutions. America was doomed.

Or so many believed.

Not far outside of America’s Belfast, the American dream was being remade. Silicon Valley launched a technological revolution, the wines of Napa Valley bested those of France in blind taste tests, efficient container ships streamed from the port of Long Beach to around the world, and the release of Star Wars beckoned Hollywood’s renewed cultural dominance. Other California trends, from the mega-churches of Orange County to the porn industry of San Fernando Valley to the rise of gay rights in San Francisco to the invention of modern comedy in L.A. standup clubs signaled a remaking of how Americans lived, worked, and saw themselves and the world around them. Little of this emerged directly from the White House situation room or the deliberations of the House Ways and Means committee. Yet all of it mattered.

Might we be in a similar situation today? Are the things that matter deeper, tectonic forces, ranging from demographics to technology to culture, shaping the world far more than the latest Trump tweet?

We forget at our own peril, however, that what makes the United States exceptional is not a political party or leader, or even a specific ideology. America is aspirational; a dream. Most aspirations fall short, and most dreams are not fulfilled. When the dance scene ended, the singers and dancers got back into their cars, leaned on their horns, and returned to their self-contained, solipsistic worlds. Nothing is promised, even if we work as hard as possible. That aspiration, however, that dream, no matter how fleeting, is, to this historian, exceptional.

Arise! So this podcast while not directly related, did provide some contextual peace by way of the Roman republic.

Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History: Addendum – EP2 Rome Through Duncan’s Eyes