[Discussion] Climate Change

This thread is just to post interesting news, thoughts, opinions about climate change.

farley3k wrote:
OG_slinger wrote:

It's a tie between leases and a shocking number of managers and bosses who have a compulsive need to physically see their minions slaving away.

Well they realized if they don't have minions to watch they actually have nothing to do. Work goes on, profit gets made, and they are not needed. So it could be a bit of self protection.

These, and a severe lack of trust. Companies continuing to support remote work are accomplishing great things.

I don't see how Seattle is back to pre pandemic traffic with Amazon largely working from home, still. I think it's still the city's largest employer. I took a Lyft through downtown earlier in the week though and there were lots of pedestrians and cars so I do see the evidence.

Las Vegas is down to less than 20 days of drinkable water and scrambling to deal with it. Kind of speaks for itself. Las Vegas is a city of 645,000 people, the largest in NV. This is larger than Baltimore, Raleigh NC, Miami FL and Atlanta GA.

Why is this not blaring out over the media? Why are my friends still retiring to Arizona and Florida? WTF, people?

NM?
AZ and FL I guess they are betting on dying before it gets too bad

For years, that's what many of my conservative friends would say. "Regardless of whether climate change is happening, I'll be dead by the time it's bad, so who cares?"

I guess as long as it twists the libs tails they are good with $500m per day on climate-related problems...

Robear wrote:

Las Vegas is a city of 645,000 people, the largest in NM.

Close, but wrong state.

Yeah, the whole screw everyone else while I'm alive and screw em when I die has never been a good look. f*ck you Ayn Rand, Reagan, Federalist Society, Energy lobbyists and the Christian Coalition...

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Close, but wrong state.

One letter. One letter! Geez...

Is FL having potable water problems as well?

De Santis would never let us know.

Florida's water issues, as I understand them as an out-of-stater, center on saltwater intrusion along the coast, and the failure of the Everglades as a fresh-water filter) and the essential deregulation of water use from Lake Okeechobee (which is Florida's largest lake, but only averages 9 feet deep, and has issues with highly toxic pollutants and, yes, saltware intrusion).

For example, it's common in coastal communities not to have sewer lines, probably because the water is so close to the surface. However, there was room for septic systems. So as the saltwater intrusions occur (because of freshwater wells drawing down underground reserves) the septic systems become vulnerable to rising water in the soil. This may not show immediately, but when a good soaking rain causes floods, the septic systems can be overcome by groundwater. And those freshwater wells will gradually succumb to both toxic chemical migration and saltwater moving in. This means that entire neighborhood housing markets in many coastal cities and towns are starting to crash, as people realize that its not just flooding that is a big, intermittent threat, but that their drinking water and sewage systems may become unusable after storms, and eventually for good.

It's only going to get worse.

OG_slinger wrote:

Flooding of the Indus River in Pakistan. August 31, 2021 vs. August 31, 2022. The width of the image is 290 kilometers.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/H39SbLY.png)

FYI, it's still bad in Pakistan.

I know I'm a broken record here, and I apologize, but anyone truly concerned about migration needs to be super concerned about climate change, because people are not just going to stay in increasingly unlivable parts of the world and die (moreover, I'd wager none of them want to leave anyway, they're being forced to!).

Pretty sure the people super concerned about migration would be perfectly happy with the idea that the people migrating should stay and die. They're going to see it as a personal choice to live there and dying from a "natural" disaster is just a consequence (you see, its natural, so it's not like it's their fault), the same way they see living in poverty as a personal choice.

Well, yes, that part is also 150% true. I wouldn't even say "be perfectly happy," I'd say "prefer and actively advocate for, without necessarily saying it explicitly."

Oh they are perfectly content now with saying the quiet parts out loud

Prederick wrote:
OG_slinger wrote:

Flooding of the Indus River in Pakistan. August 31, 2021 vs. August 31, 2022. The width of the image is 290 kilometers.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/H39SbLY.png)

FYI, it's still bad in Pakistan.

I know I'm a broken record here, and I apologize, but anyone truly concerned about migration needs to be super concerned about climate change, because people are not just going to stay in increasingly unlivable parts of the world and die (moreover, I'd wager none of them want to leave anyway, they're being forced to!).

Video of the city of Khairpur Nathan Shah shot from a helicopter. The city--where 250,000 people used to live--is now entirely underwater.

I hate headline writers.

Florida reels from Ian's 1-in-1,000 year rains

The Earth is billions of years old. Sure it may statistically be 1 in 1000 but that means we could have this kind of thing every freaking year for the next 50 but then not again for the 200,000,000 following years and be at that average (well I didn't do the math but just picked numbers so it may be off)

The way they state the headline we are supposed to have a bit of relief that this hardly happens but because of of climate change it is going to happen more and more.

Well, except that over that timeframe it's probably not 1 in a thousand. Also, if it starts happening regularly, then we'd simply adjust the odds to reflect that. It's obviously not set in stone.

But yeah, this will be more common, most likely, than it was in the past. How much more is really hard to say.