[News] Post a Political News Story

Ongoing discussion of the political news of the day.

John Conyers. And there's more. That story links to a Washington Post story about the creepily-named Office of Compliance, whose main job appears to be quietly handling sexual harassment complaints. The office has paid out over $17 million in the last 20 years as part of 264 secret settlements.

Another staffer said that Conyers’ reputation made people fearful to speak out against him. Aside from being the longest-serving House member and the ranking member of a powerful committee, Conyers is a civil rights icon. He was lauded by Martin Luther King Jr. and is a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

“Your story won’t do sh*t to him,” said the staffer. “He’s untouchable.”

I suspect this is the tip of the iceberg with regard to Congress.

This one actually didn't surprise me at all. Last Week Tonight has done multiple "And Now, This..." segments with long montages of all the times on CBS This Morning that things got really risque between him and his female cohosts. Lots of innuendo, wink wink, etc. from Mr. Rose. The women always laughed it off but to hear that he's gone even further my reaction is "well, duh."

Prederick wrote:

I was about to post that. I was talking with a friend today, and we agreed that, at this point, we all need to be prepared for the possibility of some sh*t coming out about Mr. Rodgers.

Aaron D. wrote:
Prederick wrote:

I was about to post that. I was talking with a friend today, and we agreed that, at this point, we all need to be prepared for the possibility of some sh*t coming out about Mr. Rodgers.

was the a song for all the fingers, or Mr Rodgers just getting savage?

Boudreaux wrote:

This one actually didn't surprise me at all. Last Week Tonight has done multiple "And Now, This..." segments with long montages of all the times on CBS This Morning that things got really risque between him and his female cohosts. Lots of innuendo, wink wink, etc. from Mr. Rose. The women always laughed it off but to hear that he's gone even further my reaction is "well, duh."

Same here, and I haven't seen the Last Week Tonight clips and have only seen CBS this morning maybe once, yet this was my take on him from that brief, shall I say, exposure. What I saw was a total creeper. In fact, his interactions with the two women is what made me turn the channel and not tune in again. I'm more surprised to hear the co-hosts saying they're surprised. However, I would be truly surprised to hear this of Mr. Rodgers, but who knows.

Edit to add: "Where is Thumbkin" was a totally innocent and for some reason really fun children's song. I remember loving to sing it as a kid. It was a regular kindergarten song.

Obligatory story: I ran into Mr. Rogers on the street once and was struck silent with awe and then he was past me and gosh.

LRN2GWJNOOB

thrawn82 wrote:
Aaron D. wrote:
Prederick wrote:

I was about to post that. I was talking with a friend today, and we agreed that, at this point, we all need to be prepared for the possibility of some sh*t coming out about Mr. Rodgers.

was the a song for all the fingers, or Mr Rodgers just getting savage?

It's all the fingers. Same tune as Frere Jacques. The middle finger was Tall Man, in our version.

There was a time I would've assumed Cosby was beyond reproach. But, here we are. Not having nice things.

Edit: Totally missed SR's edit.

My hope is that light continues to shine on this crap. That social injustices of the past are recognized, and we truly enter a time where people feel less afraid to speak up about it (can I hope for 'unafraid' but recognize that's improbable?). Victims should know that people will stand with them. Potential perpetrators should understand that dignity and respect belong to everyone, and there is a meaningful price to pay for ignoring that. We must not grant the economically powerful and socially influential a pass to remove the power and influence of other human beings. Granting that leads to this sickness; as well as the anger, pain, and deep disappointment we're all feeling. In differing degrees and ways, we all own this failure to protect each other.

I think I've figured out the problem with FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. He watched too much Futurama and Zapp Brannigan became his hero.

IMAGE(http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/aa/aa0bb0d5d3e4276d38bb9f537fc934df7bfec954fff7fa70e84d9b161a345475.jpg)

Facebook (Still) Letting Housing Advertisers Exclude Users by Race

Last week, ProPublica bought dozens of rental housing ads on Facebook, but asked that they not be shown to certain categories of users, such as African Americans, mothers of high school kids, people interested in wheelchair ramps, Jews, expats from Argentina and Spanish speakers.
All of these groups are protected under the federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to publish any advertisement “with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.” Violators can face tens of thousands of dollars in fines.
Every single ad was approved within minutes.
The only ad that took longer than three minutes to be approved by Facebook sought to exclude potential renters “interested in Islam, Sunni Islam and Shia Islam.” It was approved after 22 minutes.

Oh, good, redlining. How nice.

BadKen wrote:

I think I've figured out the problem with FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. He watched too much Futurama and Zapp Brannigan became his hero.

IMAGE(http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/aa/aa0bb0d5d3e4276d38bb9f537fc934df7bfec954fff7fa70e84d9b161a345475.jpg)

Sadly, given 3 of 5 chairs on the vote are Republican, I'd say Net Neutrality is basically dead in the water.

Can't wait to pay $5 extra for access to Twitch, $5 extra for access to Hearthstone and WoW, $5 extra for access to...

LouZiffer wrote:

My hope is that light continues to shine on this crap. That social injustices of the past are recognized, and we truly enter a time where people feel less afraid to speak up about it (can I hope for 'unafraid' but recognize that's improbable?). Victims should know that people will stand with them. Potential perpetrators should understand that dignity and respect belong to everyone, and there is a meaningful price to pay for ignoring that. We must not grant the economically powerful and socially influential a pass to remove the power and influence of other human beings. Granting that leads to this sickness; as well as the anger, pain, and deep disappointment we're all feeling. In differing degrees and ways, we all own this failure to protect each other.

Although I do agree with you, I am fearful that this will be turned into yet another front on the sad little culture war we find ourselves in. I like to think we are evolving and it is a painful process as these issues have been with us as a species since the get-go but I'm waiting for the willfully ignorant (driven by those who gain from the friction) to find their martyr. Without getting into the weeds about taking the victims at their word (which I believe we should) I am waiting for that high profile case where someone falsely accused a high profile person and it comes to light they did it for their own benefit or revenge.

On the bright side, Trump may have inadvertently kicked off the draining of the swamp, just not in the way he intended.

Disney Executive John Lasseter Taking Leave of Absence After Reports of Misconduct

John Lasseter, the chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animations Studios, is taking a six-month leave of absence from the company after allegations that he made several unwanted advanced towards his female co-workers.
The news was reported by The Hollywood Reporter, who obtained a note Lasseter sent Disney employees internally. The statement, published below, describes unnamed “missteps” but a second report, published minutes later, specifically details several incredibly inappropriate actions.
When asked for comment, a Disney spokesperson said the following:

We are committed to maintaining an environment in which all employees are respected and empowered to do their best work. We appreciate John’s candor and sincere apology and fully support his sabbatical.

“He says it didn’t happen. You have to listen to him also.”

New York Times wrote:

President Trump defended Roy S. Moore, the Alabama Republican Senate candidate accused of sexual misconduct with minors, saying on Tuesday that Mr. Moore “totally denies” the allegations against him.

Mr. Trump said that Alabama voters should not support Doug Jones, the Democratic candidate running against Mr. Moore in a special election next month.

“We don’t need a liberal person in there, a Democrat, Jones,” Mr. Trump said. “I’ve looked at his record. It’s terrible on crime. It’s terrible on the border. It’s terrible on the military.”

Mr. Trump declined to say whether he would campaign for Mr. Moore in the final days before the election, adding that he would let reporters know next week about his plans. Asked by a reporter whether electing an accused child molester is better than electing a Democrat, Mr. Trump responded by saying that Mr. Moore denies the charges against him.

“If you look at what is really going on, and you look at all the things that have happened over the last 48 hours, he totally denies it,” Mr. Trump said. “He says it didn’t happen. You have to listen to him also.”

Mr. Trump had declined to weigh in on the charges against Mr. Moore for more than a week, leaving it to his press secretary to say only that the president believed it was up to Alabama voters to decide.

Mr. Trump had issued an earlier statement expressing confidence that Mr. Moore would step aside if the charges against him were true.

In brief comments on Air Force One during his recent trip to Asia, Mr. Trump said he had not had time to examine the allegations against Mr. Moore. He added, “I’ll have further comment as we go down the road. I have to get back into the country to see what’s happening.”

Speaking before he left for his Thanksgiving break in Palm Beach, Florida, Mr. Trump also responded on Tuesday to a question about what a reporter called “this pivotal moment” regarding sexual assault.

“Women are very special,” the president said. “I think it’s a very special time, a lot of things are coming out, and I think that’s good for our society and I think it’s very very good for women, and I’m very happy these things are coming out.”

Departure of U.S. Census director threatens 2020 count

Prepare for things to get even worse.

If you have the horrible misfortune to be sexually harassed you should hope it is by a Democrat because then they might be held accountable (probably not) but if it is a Republican you can bet you will be called a liar, or you asked for it.

SillyRabbit wrote:
Boudreaux wrote:

This one actually didn't surprise me at all. Last Week Tonight has done multiple "And Now, This..." segments with long montages of all the times on CBS This Morning that things got really risque between him and his female cohosts. Lots of innuendo, wink wink, etc. from Mr. Rose. The women always laughed it off but to hear that he's gone even further my reaction is "well, duh."

Same here, and I haven't seen the Last Week Tonight clips and have only seen CBS this morning maybe once, yet this was my take on him from that brief, shall I say, exposure. What I saw was a total creeper. In fact, his interactions with the two women is what made me turn the channel and not tune in again. I'm more surprised to hear the co-hosts saying they're surprised. However, I would be truly surprised to hear this of Mr. Rodgers, but who knows.

I saw both the "Last Week Tonight" and other random clips of the show when flipping channels while the Today Show was on commercial break. Dude creeped me out every time.

And when it hit yesterday I pulled up both LWT segments on youtube to show my wife who the story was about. Yeah, still creepy. And I can't believe his co-hosts weren't aware. Hell I just assumed they were 2 of the 8.

So if multiple women are accusing Moore, and Moore denies it, shouldn't Trump call for an immediate and total shutdown on Roy Moores running for Senate, until they can figure out what the hell is going on?

oilypenguin wrote:

Departure of U.S. Census director threatens 2020 count

Prepare for things to get even worse.

From what I've read previously the 2020 Census is going to be an absolute clusterf*ck. The Census Bureau is already robbing Peter to pay Paul, delaying an Economic Census scheduled for next year to pay for prep work for the 2020 Census because Congress is dramatically underfunding it.

It's almost as if Republicans don't want the 2020 Census to be successful because properly counting Americans--especially Hispanics and blacks--would mean that the subsequent Congressional redistricting and reapportionment would favor Democrats and hurt Republicans, who pretty much rely entirely on white voters.

Yep, just part of the GoP plan: Hold onto power at any costs.

Stele wrote:

Yep, just part of the GoP plan: Hold onto power at any costs.

This is why my current feeling is that we're just irreparably screwed.

Stele wrote:

Yep, just part of the GoP plan: Hold onto power at any costs.

A quick preview of the 2020 GOP Campaign

IMAGE(https://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/tropico/images/e/e8/Vote_el_presidente_tropico3.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20120105165706)

Except more orange I guess, and with less manly hair.

OG_slinger wrote:

“He says it didn’t happen. You have to listen to him also.”

New York Times wrote:

President Trump defended Roy S. Moore, the Alabama Republican Senate candidate accused of sexual misconduct with minors, saying on Tuesday that Mr. Moore “totally denies” the allegations against him.

Mr. Trump said that Alabama voters should not support Doug Jones, the Democratic candidate running against Mr. Moore in a special election next month.

“We don’t need a liberal person in there, a Democrat, Jones,” Mr. Trump said. “I’ve looked at his record. It’s terrible on crime. It’s terrible on the border. It’s terrible on the military.”

Mr. Trump declined to say whether he would campaign for Mr. Moore in the final days before the election, adding that he would let reporters know next week about his plans. Asked by a reporter whether electing an accused child molester is better than electing a Democrat, Mr. Trump responded by saying that Mr. Moore denies the charges against him.

“If you look at what is really going on, and you look at all the things that have happened over the last 48 hours, he totally denies it,” Mr. Trump said. “He says it didn’t happen. You have to listen to him also.”

Mr. Trump had declined to weigh in on the charges against Mr. Moore for more than a week, leaving it to his press secretary to say only that the president believed it was up to Alabama voters to decide.

Mr. Trump had issued an earlier statement expressing confidence that Mr. Moore would step aside if the charges against him were true.

In brief comments on Air Force One during his recent trip to Asia, Mr. Trump said he had not had time to examine the allegations against Mr. Moore. He added, “I’ll have further comment as we go down the road. I have to get back into the country to see what’s happening.”

Speaking before he left for his Thanksgiving break in Palm Beach, Florida, Mr. Trump also responded on Tuesday to a question about what a reporter called “this pivotal moment” regarding sexual assault.

“Women are very special,” the president said. “I think it’s a very special time, a lot of things are coming out, and I think that’s good for our society and I think it’s very very good for women, and I’m very happy these things are coming out.”

Doug Jones was a damn prosecutor who went after the KKK, how the heck is he soft on crime?

...

Oh right. *eyeroll*

Chaz wrote:
Stele wrote:

Yep, just part of the GoP plan: Hold onto power at any costs.

This is why my current feeling is that we're just irreparably screwed.

I don't think we're irreparably screwed. We've already passed the point where most children born today are minorities. By 2050ish the a majority of the country's population will be minorities.

The GOP is trying to fight a delaying action against the demographic reality of America. That's a battle they have no chance of winning.

Every presidential election cycle has seen the non-Hispanic white portion of the electorate drop by several percentage points, from nearly 86% in 1992 to less than 74% in 2016. About 30 to 40 percent of those white voters are going to vote Democratic, meaning the GOP has to constantly figure out ways to turn out the remaining white vote if they want to stay in power.

Trump got 81% of white evangelical voters (who represent 26% of all voters). It's going to be hard for future Republicans to improve that turnout by appealing more to religious voters.

That leaves one tool left in the Republican toolkit to goose white voter turnout: the dog whistle. And the more they use that, the fewer Hispanics will decide that the GOP is for them.

At a certain point in GOP will have to accept that they can't rely on white voters to stay in power.

At a certain point in GOP will have to accept that they can't rely on white voters to stay in power

Yeah, but if that point isn't until 2040, we're still f*cked for the next 20 years.

The lesson of 2016 was very much that we're not there yet.

Jonman wrote:

Yeah, but if that point isn't until 2040, we're still f*cked for the next 20 years.

The counter, of course, is for the Democratic Party to stop worrying about the rural and working class whites who will never vote for them and concentrate on turning out black and Hispanic voters. Black voter turnout dropped significantly in 2016 and Hispanic turnout is still hovering below 50%.

And for that to work that means the Democratic Party actually has to get behind policies that address the specific needs and concerns of those communities instead of giving them lip service.

OG_slinger wrote:
Jonman wrote:

Yeah, but if that point isn't until 2040, we're still f*cked for the next 20 years.

The counter, of course, is for the Democratic Party to stop worrying about the rural and working class whites who will never vote for them and concentrate on turning out black and Hispanic voters. Black voter turnout dropped significantly in 2016 and Hispanic turnout is still hovering below 50%.

And for that to work that means the Democratic Party actually has to get behind policies that address the specific needs and concerns of those communities instead of giving them lip service.

Actually doing so results in even more push back from white voters, even ones who are, apparently, "Progressive". A situation that I know doesn't actually exist to make me angry, but definitely has it as a side effect. See the whole "We have to start focusing on economic issues" argument.

BadKen wrote:

Okay, just one minute here...

FCC will also order states to scrap plans for their own net neutrality laws

Can the FCC do that? Isn't that a little beyond their authority? Like, states rights and all?

That only applies when it's something the Republicans want done.

Okay, just one minute here...

FCC will also order states to scrap plans for their own net neutrality laws

Can the FCC do that? Isn't that a little beyond their authority? Like, states rights and all?

Zona wrote:

Actually doing so results in even more push back from white voters, even ones who are, apparently, "Progressive". A situation that I know doesn't actually exist to make me angry, but definitely has it as a side effect. See the whole "We have to start focusing on economic issues" argument.

Only about one third of white voters voted for Hillary. They were overwhelmingly college educated, lived in cities, or both. Some of those white voters may heed the siren call of the GOP's dog whistle, but education and where you live have historically correlated with how you vote.

Education level is a prime driver of voting preference: the more you have the much more you're likely to vote Democratic.

It also turns out where white people live is a strong determiner of how they will vote. Trump's performance was weakest among racially diverse metropolises and suburbs and strongest in the suburbs and rural areas that were overwhelmingly white, like 95%+ white (Trump's support dramatically increased in areas that were 85%+ white). It's almost like living among people who are different than you makes you less likely to believe crazy, racist things about them.

The later is important because as the minority population of America increases--as it rapidly will in the coming years--there's going to be fewer and fewer towns that remain lilly white. And as more of those white voters are exposed to people different than them Republican racial FUD is going to have less of an impact.