The Legend of Zelda: Breath of The Wild Catch All

Wrong thread!

RnR, wrong thread, friend.

Just caught back up with the thread. I picked this back up about 2 weeks ago and have been sucked right back in. I spent some time figuring out how to spawn a certain flying foe for some rare cooking parts, and I just finished my 3rd divine beast.

The more I play, the less I understand the weapon durability complaints. I feel like I'm continuously throwing away good weapons to make room for new ones. How are people burning through them so quickly?

Dyni wrote:

RnR, wrong thread, friend.

Just caught back up with the thread. I picked this back up about 2 weeks ago and have been sucked right back in. I spent some time figuring out how to spawn a certain flying foe for some rare cooking parts, and I just finished my 3rd divine beast.

The more I play, the less I understand the weapon durability complaints. I feel like I'm continuously throwing away good weapons to make room for new ones. How are people burning through them so quickly?

I think for me, it just feels completely bizarre. I'm continuously getting good weapons, but tossing away weapons just feels so wrong.

Demosthenes wrote:

I think for me, it just feels completely bizarre. I'm continuously getting good weapons, but tossing away weapons just feels so wrong.

IMAGE(http://redqueencoder.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/LetItGo.jpg)

As someone who recently picked up Zelda after hearing a lot about it, this has to be an early, bounced-off-the-game complaint. This does feel weird early. Your halfway decent Soldier's Broadsword breaks after only a few enemies, leaving you with a couple of found spears and clubs. If you quit there, that's your impression.

If you're still playing after 40 hours, you know where to find more weapons, or more likely you dont even bother going to look for them, you know they find you.

Tarrey Town is one of my favorite quest lines. It's great to see the area change in architecture and grow in population, and with a mix of the races.

Throwing away good weapons has been so hard for me. Cloquette helped me a bit with the letting it go advice on Slack, but my video game hoarder tendencies make it tough.

That this game forces you to make hard choices about your weapons is one of the things I love about it though because it makes me overcome my neuroses. The only other game I’ve played that does the same is Race for the Galaxy, which is probably my favorite tabletop game.

At this point I've realized I can easily go grab almost any good weapon I want. I've marked my favorites on the map so I can go get another one when the one I have breaks. I leave ransom weapons behind all the time. I leave so many shrine chests unopened now it's kind of ridiculous.

PaladinTom wrote:

I beat the game including all four beasts and NEVER was able to take down a Lynel. That's the beauty of open worlders IMO. I just moved on and never went back and still had a great time. In a linear game I would've had to cheat or quit.

For anyone who never got the hang of Lynels, here's a rundown of the tips which turned my wife (very much not a gamer) into a pro Lynel hunter.

Lynel guide:

Spoiler:

Tip 1: start with avoiding damage. Lynels have a very limited number of attack patterns, and every pattern can be safely dodged or avoided (see below). The main challenge at the beginning is surviving long enough to see and get used to the patterns!

So to begin with, you'll need to stock up on food and eat a lot - possibly every time you get hit. Obviously upgraded armor helps here, and try to start on a red Lynel, preferably one using a 1H sword or a spear. Then, just focus purely on dodging for a while. Getting hits in after you know the patterns is very easy, learning the patterns while you try to do damage is very hard.

Tip 2: you need to be comfortable with jump-dodging (the maneuver you learn in the combat shrine, where you target the enemy and then either jump backwards or sideways). Note that you don't have to land them perfectly! (the thing where time slows down.) As long as you get the direction of the jump right, you can avoid the hits. You just need to be able to consistently do the move, which means that Link needs to be squared up, facing the Lynel and locked on (i.e. targeting him with the shield button).

Tip 3 - the surprising bit - you may find that the biggest challenge here is camera control. If you're not a heavy console gamer you may not be used to running around and controlling the camera at the same time, and for most of BotW you can get away without learning it. But for Lynel fights you pretty much need to get comfortable with this - because you can't dodge unless you're locked on, and the locking system (usually?) only works if you're facing the target.

So avoiding hits is really a two step process - step one is getting yourself ready, facing the Lynel at medium distance and locked on, before the attack starts, and step to is dodging the attack. And the key takeaway to all this is that if you're not already comfortable with right-thumb camera controls you may find step one very challenging at first. Once you get yourself facing the enemy though, you'll find the actual dodges are a breeze.

Tip 4: the actual dodging! Lynels basically have three flavors of attacks:

  • Attacks you run away from: anything where the Lynel shoots arrows or breathes fire, or does an AoE around himself (these always start with a long "I'm angrrryyy!!!" animation)
  • Attacks where you jump-dodge sideways: any melee attack where the Lynel charges into you or swings his weapon in a vertical arc
  • Attacks where you jump-dodge backwards: any melee attack where the Lynel swings his weapon in a swiping motion

The specific animations vary by Lynel type and weapon type, but they all fit in those categories. The first set are easy to spot and easy to avoid, so the task of killing a Lynel without taking any damage basically boils down to the other two - i.e. seeing a melee attack and knowing whether to dodge back or sideways. A few of the animations are a little tricky, but a given Lynel only has, I think, 2 or 3 variations, so once you know what you're doing you'll quickly get the hang of it.

Important thing I forgot: use a 1H weapon and shield, to start out. That way when you jump the wrong direction you'll usually still block the attack. You'll tear through shields pretty fast though. You can also block while using 2H weapons, but you have to sheathe the weapon after each attack, and it's more to think about.

Advanced topics: you can also freeze Lynels, shoot them in the head to stun them, get on their backs, etc. I wouldn't worry about this stuff until you're comfortably avoiding their damage. Things like this are great for speeding up the fight once you're in control, but they won't help you much if you're not able to consistently avoid the attacks.

Apologies that it's so long, I didn't have time to make it shorter, as the saying goes. But if you give it a try I think you'll soon come to regard Lynels as some of the easier fights in BotW (since they generally never have complications like multiple enemies or unfriendly terrain).

First time Nintendo console owner and Zelda player here.

And I remembered that I f-ing HATE boss fights when I got to the Waterblight Gannon fight today. I'm still stuck on it and it's pretty damned possible I'll never get past it. Not because I can't if I put the work into it. It's that I have no interest in learning attack patterns, and then repeating the same moves over and over again as I wear it down, until: Oh boy! Another form with new attacks to learn! Ugh. Zero fun for me. And I get that "that's part of what makes a Zelda game a Zelda game." But... maybe Zelda games aren't for me. That's too bad, as I was really enjoying it up until now.

lostlobster wrote:

First time Nintendo console owner and Zelda player here.

And I remembered that I f-ing HATE boss fights when I got to the Waterblight Gannon fight today. I'm still stuck on it and it's pretty damned possible I'll never get past it. Not because I can't if I put the work into it. It's that I have no interest in learning attack patterns, and then repeating the same moves over and over again as I wear it down, until: Oh boy! Another form with new attacks to learn! Ugh. Zero fun for me. And I get that "that's part of what makes a Zelda game a Zelda game." But... maybe Zelda games aren't for me. That's too bad, as I was really enjoying it up until now.

The bosses give you some useful traversing abilities. That said, just explore and focus on the shrines and build up your hearts and stamina. Then come back to them stocked up with potions, and they'll be trivial. That's kinda what I did. I'm not good at boss fights. That's kinda what kills the Souls games for me. I like all the other stuff, but I just get bored with learning boss fights and dying a bunch doing so.

I was happy to see very few boss fights in this one, because really I feel the same way as lostlobster. I enjoy the exploration and puzzles of games like Zelda and Metroid. The fighting I can take or leave, usually leave, but its fun enough in this iteration of Zelda. You can really get a lot out of this game doing everything but the boss fights. They don't gate much.

If you simply must FINISH the game, well there's a problem, but if you're happy exploring, doing puzzles, doing quests, that's 99% of this game.

Like Tuffalo said, you can pretty much brute force the boss battles too. Get a +20 hearts recipe, get a +fight or +defense 5 mins recipe, eat as needed during the fight.

lostlobster wrote:

First time Nintendo console owner and Zelda player here.

And I remembered that I f-ing HATE boss fights when I got to the Waterblight Gannon fight today. I'm still stuck on it and it's pretty damned possible I'll never get past it. Not because I can't if I put the work into it. It's that I have no interest in learning attack patterns, and then repeating the same moves over and over again as I wear it down, until: Oh boy! Another form with new attacks to learn! Ugh. Zero fun for me. And I get that "that's part of what makes a Zelda game a Zelda game." But... maybe Zelda games aren't for me. That's too bad, as I was really enjoying it up until now.

Come back later, use potions, get better weapons, etc. Most of the same advice from the Lynel conversation. You're not locked into doing the fights when you get to them. You can leave the Divine Beast at any time and come back to it later to do the boss fight. I don't believe you'll need to redo any part of the Beast.

lostlobster wrote:

And I get that "that's part of what makes a Zelda game a Zelda game." But... maybe Zelda games aren't for me. That's too bad, as I was really enjoying it up until now.

Not every game speaks to everyone. Sometimes its merely a facet or two that are not quite agreeable. It happens.

It does read as if you were having a good time up until this moment. Go back to what you were enjoying. Play your way. Discover more. Breath of the Wild is quite flexible in this regard. Other Zelda games, not as much.

Or drop it and be happier. I remember banging my head against a few games that everyone loved, yet never quite getting there myself. Or not until a second effort some time later.

lostlobster wrote:

First time Nintendo console owner and Zelda player here.

And I remembered that I f-ing HATE boss fights when I got to the Waterblight Gannon fight today. I'm still stuck on it and it's pretty damned possible I'll never get past it. Not because I can't if I put the work into it. It's that I have no interest in learning attack patterns, and then repeating the same moves over and over again as I wear it down, until: Oh boy! Another form with new attacks to learn! Ugh. Zero fun for me. And I get that "that's part of what makes a Zelda game a Zelda game." But... maybe Zelda games aren't for me. That's too bad, as I was really enjoying it up until now.

Find fairy fountains to upgrade your armor and use potions for defense or attacks bonuses. Once I figured that out the bosses went down quick. Also no shame in watching a walk through video to get past the things you don’t like to get to more of what you do like

Thanks for the advice and encouragement, all. I watched a video on how to beat the boss, and -- after several attempts and screaming at the television in frustration -- got through it. I am now dedicating myself to exploring and leveling up.

I completed the Hylian Home Owner (Hateno Village) and From the Ground Up (Tarrey Town) quest lines. They were a lovely change of pace from being the "hero" and all that comes with it. I enjoyed them very much, and appreciated how they could run almost the course of a play through. I made progress here and there over the course of my game. Closing these chapters feels like finally entering the closing stages, amongst only having one divine beast left to free.

I still have a few areas untouched so putting a time scale on my "end game" is unlikely. It could be 5 hours or 50!

Does the game continue or end upon defeating Ganon? I'm picturing running around a free world without certain elements present, but I'm not sure it would be possible.

lostlobster wrote:

Thanks for the advice and encouragement, all. I watched a video on how to beat the boss, and -- after several attempts and screaming at the television in frustration -- got through it. I am now dedicating myself to exploring and leveling up.

Remember that you can look at things as gear checks. Apart from a few very particular cases we're not talking about, you can trivialize every encounter in the game just by bringing a bunch of food.

In this sense I don't think the designers meant BotW to be a "hard" game, in any sense (ergo the Souls comparison is higher than a kite), but you can very easily make encounters harder than they need to be if you unconsciously set yourself rules because you're trying not to cheese through things, etc.

I had this problem with the DLC bosses on hard mode, FWIW. I fought them as they were "meant to be fought" (surely!?!?) by trying to land perfect dodges and counters and whatnot, and kept getting stomped, and it was only when I cheesed them, by stun-locking them and abusing the hero powers and not letting them start their attack animations, that I got past them easily.

RnRClown wrote:

Does the game continue or end upon defeating Ganon? I'm picturing running around a free world without certain elements present, but I'm not sure it would be possible.

You get closing cut scenes and then go back to your saved game before the fight.

My personal advice is don't put off the final Ganon fight. It's not *that* climactic - I mean it's not a huge disappointment, but it's not a huge "oh wow I'm spent" thing - and also if you delay it until you've beaten everything else it's not challenging at all.

Just my two cents, but if I was doing it over I'd have done the castle + Ganon immediately after the 4th beast, and then been all "okay let's finish stuff up".

Thanks for the tip. I’m on my way to my last beast and was trying to decide what to do afterwards.

Also, in terms of not cheesing or powering up with food and such, I feel like the existence of Eventide Island demonstrates that the designers want to empower you to fully use the systems in every other case to do what you want. They give you all these systems because the right way to play is to use them how you want. If they don’t want you to have them, they take them away like the champion powers in the shrines.

Whatsit Island is what I was referring to as the exception to the rule, yeah - that and some boss fights in the DLC. Apart from those, you can win through skill or you can win by stocking up on hearty durians, it's entirely your choice.

(Quick impression of my wife: "I'm gonna go gather durians. If I use any more I'll almost be below 200.")

I barely have any heart increasing foods. Must go looking for some. Scouring my inventory reveals 100+ of almost every monster part, and rocks, lots of rocks.

The heart increasing foods make everything easier. There’s so many one shot kills if you’re not powered up even by random enemies scattered around the world.

RnRClown wrote:

I barely have any heart increasing foods. Must go looking for some. Scouring my inventory reveals 100+ of almost every monster part, and rocks, lots of rocks.

One thing the game doesn't make super clear is that heart-increasing foods make other foods obsolete, in that they heal you to full in addition to whatever additional hearts they give. So you don't want to cook them together, into like a 10-yellow-heart food, you cook them each individually into a bunch of foods that give you two bonus hearts (but also restore your entire life no matter how much you're damaged).

One other tip - sell excess rocks. The only thing gems are used for is upgrading armor and selling, and the armor they upgrade isn't terribly useful. There's a late-game place you can sell gems for slightly more than the base price, but IIRC it's only 10% more.

I beat a White Lynel! It was tough. That's one red, two blue, and a white. They will fear the name, Link!

Managed to get the armor. Back on track.

One of the things that impressed me about the game was how it let you brute force/combat skillz your way past the "puzzle" bosses. Usually in a Zelda game there's a boss that's all about a thing, and you have to use the thing to beat it. With BotW it felt like I had more options. Yes, I could screw around with my runes in true Zelda fashion. Or I can use my bow because it's faster, even if it does cost resources.

I'm pretty sure for one of the Divine Beasts I was supposed to win by doing... something with Magnesis I think... but instead I just jacked up my resistance and busted out the heavy artillery bows and arrows.

Sometimes your special abilities will let you cheese a boss mechanic a couple times, so if you can pump your damage enough you can kill them in that window.

I sold a bunch of rocks. I sold silly quantities of monster parts. I got so many rupees I decided to go shopping for arrows, in every town, and take a peak at armor I may have forgotten about. And I had! The stealth armor, and the soldier armor. I remember them now, from early on when Link was poor, and had to scrape together rupees for the hylian set. Needless to say I got them both, and upgraded 'em to the third tier. The soldier set bests the hylian, which I've been relying on forever. How did I forget!

Divine Beast #2 down

Spoiler:

Vah Naboris. The puzzles were irritating. I ended up spoiling myself on them to get through it.

Thunderblight Ganon was a real pain in the ass. I went back through some shrines and worked on my backflips. Once I had those down, he was a piece of cake.

Also I’m apparently doing the Divine Beasts out of order, since I was supposed to do the Goron divine beast first. Good times.

There's an order? I don't think there's an order.