Random Tech Questions you want answered.

It's a closed system. The carbonation has nowhere to go except back into the liquid.

Purely anecdotal, but I've found throwing (not literally) a shaken soda back into the fridge will "calm" it back down.

T-Prime wrote:

Purely anecdotal, but I've found throwing (not literally) a shaken soda back into the fridge will "calm" it back down.

Time will also take care of it.

Rykin wrote:
T-Prime wrote:

Purely anecdotal, but I've found throwing (not literally) a shaken soda back into the fridge will "calm" it back down.

Time will also take care of it.

What about beer? A bottle leapt out at me this morning onto the floor so I put it back on the shelf.

No matter though - it was one of my wife's beers.

PaladinTom wrote:
Rykin wrote:
T-Prime wrote:

Purely anecdotal, but I've found throwing (not literally) a shaken soda back into the fridge will "calm" it back down.

Time will also take care of it.

What about beer? A bottle leapt out at me this morning onto the floor so I put it back on the shelf.

No matter though - it was one of my wife's beers. :lol:

The physics backs this up - solubility of CO2 has an inverse relationship with temperature.

So, cooling a warm, dropped soda will aid the CO2 which is no longer dissolved into the liquid to re-dissolve.

IMAGE(https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-2394f0f10c45564a661de73ac5a2326e)

My stepdad used to work for the local Coca-Cola producer/distributor here and every year after the State Fair would bring home a few hundred cans and bottles of unsold and supposedly disposed of product that had been heated and shaken and god knows what else and they were always fine after a bit of time and being chilled.

Maybe not exactly a tech question, but can anyone recommend a dual monitor VESA mount that will accommodate an asymmetric setup?

To explain: most dual monitor mounts I see appear to be designed on the assumption that you'll want one monitor on either side, with the bezels where they meet in the middle directly in front of you, so you're constantly looking either right or left. I have a main monitor I use for games which of course I want directly in front of me, and I'd like my secondary monitor off to the right and angled in for walkthroughs, chat, YouTube/Twitch, etc.

Middcore: Just buy a regular dual monitor mount and install it offset on your desk. I have the exact setup you describe on my desk (good lord excuse this mess).

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/jhjs0Tj.jpg)

This is the mount I bought about a year and a half ago, and I haven't had to adjust it at all after the initial installation.

T-Prime wrote:

Middcore: Just buy a regular dual monitor mount and install it offset on your desk. I have the exact setup you describe on my desk (good lord excuse this mess).

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/jhjs0Tj.jpg)

This is the mount I bought about a year and a half ago, and I haven't had to adjust it at all after the initial installation.

Yeah I've thought about that but the shape/construction of my desk might make clamping the mount on in that particular spot a little problematic.

It's almost like I need a mount for a three monitor setup, so the clamp mount could still be right in front of me, but with the left side arm amputated. But I don't know how easily you could just take one arm off of a triple-head mount, or if there would be balance issues.

Edit: I went ahead and ordered that Vivo mount, T-Prime - at least the price is right compared to the ones with gas spring spider robot arms. We'll see if it works out.

Quick question... I've got a XFX R9 270x with a dying fan, and while I rebuilt my system at the beginning of the year, I have very, very little money to put into it right now (and couldn't budget in a new GPU, so this is one I got on a Black Friday sale a few years back). Once my wife gets paid again I plan to grab a couple replacement fans and just replace both at the same time ($24), but would it be worth paying another $10 for some Arctic Silver, remove the heatsink and re-apply the paste?

This card has always been on the loud/hot side, but right now it sounds like a wounded helicopter going down while holding around 80C in games, and I'm hoping to band-aid it enough to get another year, maybe two out of it until I can find a replacement I can afford.

If you're going to be taking the shroud off of it already to deal with the fans, I absolutely would clean off and re-apply thermal paste.

Yup, it was definitely worth it. I've been playing Conan Exiles a fair bit and that game in particular could push the card up to 85C, with my idling being about 45C. Replacing the fans and paste dropped that down 10C on both accounts. Now I just need to save up and replace the card outright, but I might be able to limp along on this card for another year while I get my finances straight.

My myriad of health issues has me prone to falls and I simply don't have the strength to get back up when it happens. I dont want my partner to hurt herself trying to help me. Anyone aware of any effective tools/gadgetstools/gadgets that may help us out of these situations?

Falling from what? There are simple guardrails that you can use for a bed.

Kurrelgyre wrote:

Falling from what? There are simple guardrails that you can use for a bed.

usually during transfers. EW'eve eliminated most of them now but every now and then down I go.

This barely counts as a tech question, but:

Spoiler:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/xU48qPK.jpg)

Anybody have any ideas how to get this tiny little nut on the back bracket of an EVGA liquid cooler off? It's stuck to the corresponding screw so it just spins with the screw instead of the screw coming out, and it's holding the motherboard hostage.

Things I have already tried: Holding the nut with pliers and turning the screw with another set of pliers, spraying WD40 into the nut, trying to bash the screw out of the nut by sticking a tiny screwdriver into the nut and hitting it with a hammer.

Drill?

If it were me, I'd remove one of those other screws, then feed it into the hole you have pictured. Once it gets really tight, the back screw should hold the front screw just through friction. Then basically tighten the nut onto the new screw.

PurEvil wrote:

If it were me, I'd remove one of those other screws, then feed it into the hole you have pictured. Once it gets really tight, the back screw should hold the front screw just through friction. Then basically tighten the nut onto the new screw.

The other screws don't feed in from the back side, I already tried that too.

That's... really odd. I mean, they should be able to thread in.

This really sucks because most of the methods I know to do this would not work in this case. It's not like you're going to get a nut spreader to fit that little thing. Heating and drilling are going to put you at serious risk of damaging the board.

If you have a set of diagonal pliers it might be worth attempting to cut or bend the nut to try to force it off, but it might (well, probably likely) put you in a worse position than before. Or go the other way and try to figure out how to cut the head of the screw off if you have some more room to play on that side.

What's the front look like?

I'm pretty sure I already FUBAR'd the board from when the pliers I was trying to hold the nut with slipped and scratched the back of the board, as it won't POST now. $150 of hardware down the toilet because of a nut.

One thing is for certain, and that's that I will never be buying EVGA liquid coolers (this one came on the system when I acquired it secondhand).

For interest's sake, this is what the front looks like:

Spoiler:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/vQw6JFl.jpg)

Yeah, the front isn't something you can mess with. I just had to look up a couple videos on these because I've never bothered with liquid cooling, so I wasn't sure what type of screw it was. Didn't realize it was a post.

That really sucks about the board. I'm guessing you were using needle-nose pliers? If you were, and you still want to attempt to remove this, I'd go to your local hardware store and either get a socket to fit that nut, a wrench, or a set of pliers with a flat front edge (lineman's, slip-joint, etc). You just get WAY more torque than trying to hold a nut sideways using needle-nose.

How crazy would it be to try soldering something to the nut?

If I understand his question correctly, he/she can get a perfectly good grip on it, that's not the problem. The issue is that the screw it's attached to is spinning freely. They need a way of holding the screw underneath in place so that spinning the nut actually accomplishes something.

Might end up having to cut the plastic corner out, more or less destroying the cooler.

Malor wrote:

If I understand his question correctly, he/she can get a perfectly good grip on it, that's not the problem. The issue is that the screw it's attached to is spinning freely. They need a way of holding the screw underneath in place so that spinning the nut actually accomplishes something.

Might end up having to cut the plastic corner out, more or less destroying the cooler.

Cutting the plastic bracket away wouldn't have done anything, the post/screw and its nut would still be stuck to the board. I would much sooner have destroyed a plastic bracket that could probably be replaced if it would solve the problem than destroy the board. Oh well, been building PC's eight years and I think this is the first piece of hardware I've rendered non-functional so maybe that's pretty good? At least I didn't actually need it for my system.

krev82 wrote:
Kurrelgyre wrote:

Falling from what? There are simple guardrails that you can use for a bed.

usually during transfers. EW'eve eliminated most of them now but every now and then down I go.

My wife's an OT; I'll ask her tonight, but I'm posting now so I don't lose this thread before I get a chance to see if there's an answer. To be clear, are you asking about a gadget to help you get back up, something to help eliminate falls, or something for each of those?

Malor wrote:

If I understand his question correctly, he/she can get a perfectly good grip on it, that's not the problem. The issue is that the screw it's attached to is spinning freely.

No chance. That's why the nut in the back is all marred up, because it was slipping and rotating inside the pliers, which is what makes me assume he was using needle-nose.

One thing dealing with bolts on RF amplifiers have taught me is that in this instance, needle-nose are, hands down, one of the worst types of pliers to use here because it doesn't grip well. And they're not designed for that anyway (not in high-torque settings at least). I've tried it a few times when I boomed up to an amp that was over-torqued using a drill, and didn't have my wrench on me, and it always meant I was just booming back down to grab the rest of my tools. I started keeping a 1/2" wrench on a D-ring hooked to my meter because it happened so often.

At max, you're probably looking at gripping that nut at about 10, maybe 15 pounds of torque with needle-nose. Switch to just a simple wrench and it really depends on how strong he is, but generally you'll be pushing 150-200 lbs of torque possible. It'll be more than enough to just sheer the nut off the end of the bolt, or sheer off the little nub of excess metal on the bolt that's likely causing it to be stuck in the first place.

As for soldering on something, it wouldn't work because solder is just too soft. It's way, WAY softer than the steel used in the nut and the bolt, so even if you got it to stick, it'd just fall off. Welding something to it would work, but you'd certainly damage the board even attempting that.

Most Intel motherboards require a backplate that has to be installed on the backside of the motherboard and provides the mounts to then screw the posts in that will hold the cpu block. If those get stuck you are prettt much SOL because the post on the backplate is tiny for the most part. I think the only reasonable solution would be a small dremel and attempting to carefully cut the mount in half to release the post mount. Needle nose trying to hold the post securely to then Unscrew would be really challenging because of the tight space around the cpu and the danger of slipping.

Middcore wrote:

Cutting the plastic bracket away wouldn't have done anything, the post/screw and its nut would still be stuck to the board.

If I'm understanding what I'm seeing, you could have cut that plastic corner off around the nut and screw, and then used your new 'window' to grab both simultaneously with different tools, allowing you to unscrew the nut while holding the screw stationary.

I could, of course, be failing to understand the actual problem, or how it was manifesting. But I think that would have worked. Cutting the corner off would have been a PITA, though. If there was no easier way, you could have chopped a tall pie slice out of it, and used that opening as your window.

Dremel Time!