Random Tech Questions you want answered.

Yes, all true. But current BIOSes don't have the necessary code put in. The question was why they don't do disk to disk copies natively, and the answer is still "Because they are not designed to do that". You could; but that's not the point of a BIOS, and the end result would be a booted system, kind of like Safe Mode.

Does anybody have a simple guide to set up a LAN with Windows 10? I've never been able to get one working last time I tried it a few years ago but now I've got more computers running in the home.

Norfair wrote:

Does anybody have a simple guide to set up a LAN with Windows 10? I've never been able to get one working last time I tried it a few years ago but now I've got more computers running in the home.

Can you outline in a little more detail what you're trying to do? IE, number of PCs, whether they'll have internet access, if you're utilizing a switch, etc.

If they're all on the internet already and going through a router, then the LAN is already there. PurEvil got to the point from the get-go. What do you want them to do on your LAN?

Norfair wrote:

Does anybody have a simple guide to set up a LAN with Windows 10? I've never been able to get one working last time I tried it a few years ago but now I've got more computers running in the home.

Once you enable file sharing on the PCs on your network you can usually access them just by typing \\PC-NAME into a run box.

Started a new remote helpdesk contract and they issued us a surface laptop.
So the first thing I did was research and buy a usb-c docking station on amazon.
I got this for $60 and it is so far fantastic:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...

Once you enable file sharing on the PCs on your network you can usually access them just by typing \\PC-NAME into a run box.

If you want to access a specific drive then use the $

So if you want the c drive then use:
\\pc-name\c$

The way I normally set up a Windows LAN is to use Samba on Linux.

I use the same dock at home for my work laptop. It's great. My only complaint is that it gets pretty darn warm. I keep mine in a drawer that I feed all of the cables into.

Have you tried not keeping the thing that gets warm in a drawer?

I haven't noticed that the docking station gets warm but I have it laying out in the open air and I am only currently using the displayport and 2 USB's. So far I haven't needed to use the network port as wifi is stable for work. But it is nice to know I have it if call connectivity becomes a problem.

FYI for those interested, the docking station comes with a nice variety:
1x displayport
2x hdmi
3x usb-a (2x 3.0, 1x 2.0)
network
2x sd card ( 1x big, 1x little)
2x usb-c (1x male, 1x female)

I tried, but it's so much nicer in the drawer. It's not the worst. There's a little ventilation in the back. And I turn off the power strip (that's also in the drawer) when I am done. On the plus side. No cables?

IMAGE(https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/08/05/us/05onfire1_xp/05onfire1_xp-superJumbo-v2.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp)

I'm building a Plex server with a second hand NUC I recently purchased. The goal is to control the basics with a remote, but I will sometimes need an old-skool keyboard and mouse.

Do you have any recommendations for mini-bluetooth keyboard/mouse combo's? There are so many options online I don't even know where to start.

dejanzie wrote:

I'm building a Plex server with a second hand NUC I recently purchased. The goal is to control the basics with a remote, but I will sometimes need an old-skool keyboard and mouse.

Do you have any recommendations for mini-bluetooth keyboard/mouse combo's? There are so many options online I don't even know where to start.

Does it absolutely have to be Bluetooth?

I use a Logitech K400:

https://www.logitech.com/en-us/produ...

and it's fine for when I occassionally need to type something/use a touchpad. It's not a *nice* keyboard, and I wouldn't type a term paper on it, but for something you've got stuck under the TV/in the magazine rack of the couch for when you need it, it's convenient.

If you check Amazon it's even cheaper, like $25.

I also have an "H20 mini keyboard" Shenzhen special from Amazon (it's one of those things a ton of no named companies make) that I use for my Shield TV when I have to type something in because I'm running an emulator or password. Typing on it sucks, but again, for intermittent and short typing needs it gets the job done and fits in a side table drawer easily.

I haven't really used either recently because one thing I needed a keyboard for was Netflix's stupid login (my passwords are all pretty long), but they FINALLY have a web login/QR code option for the first time since... ever.

Both use included USB receiver type things. If you want something on the nicer side, give those a pass. But for something cheap just for occassional use both have worked out for me.

I might even prefer the Logitech receiver, as the signal would probably be stabler than Bluetooth. I will be looking at the K400 for sure, thanks.

Another vote for the K400 here. I've got an older model more than 8 years old and it's still my favorite portable wireless keyboard. It's light, well built, batteries last forever, and it even has a spot in the battery compartment for the receiver. The newer model is lighter, more efficient, and has a slightly different key layout with better right shift and volume control placement.

Yup, I've had one for years for my tv pc.

The only weird issue I have is I always accidentally trigger the Win + Tab command. I can't figure out what gesture triggers it though.

I have a very similar model, the Logitech K830 which I bought for the same purpose you are looking for and even used as my main keyboard for a while. The main reason I recommend it over the K400 is that it is backlit and thus easier to use in a dark room. It is quite a bit more expensive though.

We have an army of K400 keyboards at work that we use onsite at events. Even in busy convention centers, the signal holds up well.

For my HTPC, I use something even smaller: a little handheld Rii keyboard.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/pJ9MJZR.png)

*Legion* wrote:

We have an army of K400 keyboards at work that we use onsite at events. Even in busy convention centers, the signal holds up well.

For my HTPC, I use something even smaller: a little handheld Rii keyboard.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/pJ9MJZR.png)

For some reason the K400 costs about 47EUR over here, which is too much difference to be explained by VAT alone. So I'm leaning towards this one now, as the size is very attractive too.

What's a good way to go about mapping WiFi coverage issues? I've not had much success Googling software solutions. At this point I'm thinking about inventing a haunting story so I can trick the Virginia Ghostbusters into scanning my bedroom for electromagnetic interference.

I have never used it but you might try NetSpot. It is one of the only free ones I could find. Many of them cost hundreds to even thousands of dollars.

Oh and the magic keywords to google are "wifi heatmap tool".

I use Wifi Analyzer on Android. Easy enough to carry a phone around and see what signals there are and their strengths.

Same, I think, but it took a while to prompt for the needed permissions on my Android 10 device; then it worked.

Alright, you all win.

My dad’s Linksys 54GL actually died a couple of days ago. Car hit a telephone pole and knocked out power for a bit. It was plugged into an ancient surge protector, and nothing else had any problems, but it still wasn’t behaving well. I replaced it with a brand new WiFi 5 router. Actually, two new routers - I also replaced the junky Verizon-provided one and set the second up in AP mode. Reasonably straightforward setup.

The other thing to keep in mind is that these days anything less than WPA2 with AES (CCMP) isn't considered secure anymore and those old Linksys routers don't support modern protocols. Many devices (recent iOS and Windows) will even warn you about it every time they connect.

One of the reasons I got back into open source firmware on routers is I noticed that some of my modern hardware refused to disable TKIP no matter how I configured it. I use a wifi scanning app on a tablet to test coverage and noticed that older protocols kept showing up. The other thing I noticed is that my client devices, when roaming, hated switching between different APs and extenders with the same SSID because the protocols were different (because the router refused to respect my settings).

Unless you have a really good reason to support old client devices I wouldn't use older protocols. That being said, I don't know how often people are sitting around trying to wardrive your wifi so maybe you don't care. I'm a paranoid old man when it comes to wireless so view everything I say through that lens.

My Archer C9 finally died, and I'm thinking of buying a budget WiFi6 capable router like the TP-Link AX20/21 or AX50.

DD-WRT definitely extended the life of that router by quite a bit for me, functionality-wise, but looking at new routers I'm not sure I'd still need it.

I have fiber but the AT&T mandatory router suckssss (you can't even tweak settings like what DNS to use).

Are there still compelling reasons to use OpenWRT/DD-WRT? Even entry-level routers have features like link aggregation and VPN capabilities now (like the ~$125 AX50, which is about what a new Archer C9 would have cost a few years back, too.)

Why does one of my work pcs show the C: drive as an ejectable device?

(I'm kinda tempted to try to eject it to see what happens.)

PaladinTom wrote:

Why does one of my work pcs show the C: drive as an ejectable device?

(I'm kinda tempted to try to eject it to see what happens.)

Likely because the hot swap option is enabled in the BIOS/UEFI. The machine says it can do it, so Windows says it can too.

(I wouldn't.)

LouZiffer wrote:
PaladinTom wrote:

Why does one of my work pcs show the C: drive as an ejectable device?

(I'm kinda tempted to try to eject it to see what happens.)

Likely because the hot swap option is enabled in the BIOS/UEFI. The machine says it can do it, so Windows says it can too.

(I wouldn't.)

Huh. Never knew that. Thanks!

(I didn’t… yet.)