Random Tech Questions you want answered.

Problem fixed. So the headphones has volume controls on it I didn't know about. Note I did try pressing this thing but nothing happen so I thought the little S symbol was just a decoration. The thing works by turning it. It doesn't look like a knob, its almost perfectly flat.

Yep I just had to turn the dial on the headphones.

Heh, oops!

I think I need to refresh my Windows install.

Is there an easy way to see what apps/programs I have installed so I can easily re-install them afterwards?

mudbunny wrote:

I think I need to refresh my Windows install.

Is there an easy way to see what apps/programs I have installed so I can easily re-install them afterwards?

I guess maybe just the "Add/Remove Programs" list? Otherwise, I guess you could look at what's listed when you hit the Windows key-- it should list everything installed to the left of the pop up, with Recently Added at the top then everything in alphabetical order after that.

mudbunny wrote:

I think I need to refresh my Windows install.

Is there an easy way to see what apps/programs I have installed so I can easily re-install them afterwards?

IIRC Doing a "refresh" will generate a list of all the apps you had and put in on your new desktop.

New monitor weirdness - I am running a 4K monitor on HDMI connection, and had the Win10 power scheme set to turn off the monitor after 15 minutes. Instead of putting the monitor in a sleep mode, the power would be shut off completely and I'd have to press the power button on the monitor to turn it back on. However, even though the monitor powered on (I'd get the logo screen and input setting) the screen would then go black. Nothing would bring the desktop back, except unplugging and re-connecting the HDMI cable.

I turned off the power scheme to keep the monitor always on, but I get the same behavior if I shut off the monitor for the night and then turn it back on. Monitor is clearly powered on, but no desktop unless I unplug and re-connect the HDMI cable. The monitor does not appear to have any internal power setting or sleep mode that I can adjust either.

I have no idea how to correct this. My old monitor (a Dell) had no issue - turning the monitor off (either through software or physically turning it off) was no issue and it came right back up after turning it back on. However, it was connected through DVI instead of HDMI.

Video card is an nVidia 3060.

Is this some weird HDMI thing I am not aware of? I'm using the HDMI cable that came packaged with the monitor so I'm assuming it is the correct HDMI version. Monitor is this Z-Edge 28" gaming monitor.

Have you been able to verify that the PC itself is waking up? You may need to check the wake settings in your BIOS to make sure USB wake support is on.

This might be an HDCP Handshake issue so you might try setting up a script that you can fire off via a keyboard press to change your resolution as that is sometimes an easy way to force the Handshake to reinitialize.

I am unable to find any information on what generation of HDMI ports that monitor is using so it is probably using HDMI 2.0 or older. HDMI 2.0 does support 4K 60 Hz but it doesn't support Variable Refresh Rate and that is a Freesync monitor so to use that you will need to switch to a DisplayPort. Now whether or not that monitor is supported by your GPU for the G-Sync-lite stuff is another question, but I believe you can turn it on and see if it works (I have an AMD GPU so I haven't used the latest nVidia stuff).

The 3060 supports FreeSync, at least notionally, so you could buy a DisplayPort cable, set the monitor to FreeSync, turn it on in the card menu and that will likely fix it. It'll get you better color and such for sure.

Rykin wrote:

HDMI 2.0 does support 4K 60 Hz but it doesn't support Variable Refresh Rate and that is a Freesync monitor so to use that you will need to switch to a DisplayPort.

My Samsung TV's HDMI 2.0b ports do. I am using an RTX 3070 on it at [email protected] with "G-Sync Compatible" FreeSync enabled and functioning (also can do it with [email protected] but to hell with 60hz). It's one of the reasons I upgraded to a 30-series NVIDIA card for the computer on that TV, as NVIDIA does not support G-Sync Compatible on the 10-series card I had otherwise planned on using.

That said, yeah, if the display and card both have DisplayPort, that's the easy way to go. I only bothered with HDMI because the TV lacks DP.

never mind

If I install a second SSD as a D: drive, will games still run as fast as they do on C:?

I’m not in the mood to go through the hassle of replacing my C: drive.

They should, but it has more to do with the kind of flash memory the new drive uses and how it's connected to the system than anything about it not being C:.

If you can put them on a separate bus or controller from the C: drive, that would help prevent interruptions. Consult your motherboard diagram, or at the least, don't use the same multi-headed cable to connect them to the controller...

Boudreaux wrote:

New monitor weirdness - I am running a 4K monitor on HDMI connection, and had the Win10 power scheme set to turn off the monitor after 15 minutes. Instead of putting the monitor in a sleep mode, the power would be shut off completely and I'd have to press the power button on the monitor to turn it back on. However, even though the monitor powered on (I'd get the logo screen and input setting) the screen would then go black. Nothing would bring the desktop back, except unplugging and re-connecting the HDMI cable.

I turned off the power scheme to keep the monitor always on, but I get the same behavior if I shut off the monitor for the night and then turn it back on. Monitor is clearly powered on, but no desktop unless I unplug and re-connect the HDMI cable. The monitor does not appear to have any internal power setting or sleep mode that I can adjust either.

I have no idea how to correct this. My old monitor (a Dell) had no issue - turning the monitor off (either through software or physically turning it off) was no issue and it came right back up after turning it back on. However, it was connected through DVI instead of HDMI.

Video card is an nVidia 3060.

Is this some weird HDMI thing I am not aware of? I'm using the HDMI cable that came packaged with the monitor so I'm assuming it is the correct HDMI version. Monitor is this Z-Edge 28" gaming monitor.

I used to have similar problems when I first got my LG 34UM95C Ultrawide monitor. I eventually switched to DisplayPort to resolve these kinds of issues. I could never really figure out why it was even an issue, honestly. Thinking back, it probably had to do with the amount of power the PC would send to the monitor as a wake-up call-- perhaps it wasn't enough (or not received properly?) for whatever older version of HDMI the monitor accepts...? I don't know, this is purely speculation.

Either way, switching to DP should help, I'd think.

Robear wrote:

If you can put them on a separate bus or controller from the C: drive, that would help prevent interruptions. Consult your motherboard diagram, or at the least, don't use the same multi-headed cable to connect them to the controller...

The same multi-headed cable?!?!?! An SSD on an IDE bus? I make use of Mini SAS (SFF-8087) to 4x SATA cables in my server, but you don't see SFF-8087 connectors on most motherboards

PaladinTom wrote:

If I install a second SSD as a D: drive, will games still run as fast as they do on C:?

I’m not in the mood to go through the hassle of replacing my C: drive.

If the new drive has equal or better specs, and it's on an interface that's at least as fast, it should be the same or faster than C. Drive letters themselves have no overhead. It's easily possible for your D drive to be much faster than C.

Even if the drive is worse than the one you have, and even if it's on a relatively slow SATA connection instead of a fast M.2 PCIe connection, you probably won't notice much difference in load times. Most games can't keep up with even a slow SSD, so it doesn't matter that much what kind you add. The difference from a spinning hard drive to any SSD is enormous, but the difference from slower or faster SSDs is minimal. You just want something with good firmware and no pathologies, and you should be fine.

The Samsung 970 Pros, for instance, are good solid drives that don't really screw anything up. In the M.2 format, Intel 660ps are cheap, reasonable performers. They're not that fast on benchmarks, but in actual use, you will barely notice.

Yeah, you're right Rykin, I'm behind the times. Sorry. I was thinking power and confusing it with IDE. All messed up...

Anyone around here has experience with setting up ownCloud or NextCloud? I would like to have something where my files are sync'd across my laptop and my desktop, without having to pay for DropBox or some other cloud service.

My current plan is to use my Raspberry Pi 3 as the server (and storing the files on an external drive, with a nightly batch job to rsync to another external drive).

I got a weird one.. wonder if anyone else has experienced this.. about 2 months ago I started getting weird pauses in games and in many cases the game would completely go black disappear from the taskbar then resume a few seconds later. Only error I could find that seemed to time along with the issue is a weird warning in event viewer.

Disk 6 has been surprised removed Event ID 157

I have no Disk 6.. but it was almost timed perfectly.. so I did some digging.. turns out I'm not alone.. and it seems to be related to Xbox Game Pass

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...

I also have at least 60 hidden Xvd's like others have posted.. you have to find them using Device Manager and select Show Hidden Devices and then look under Disk Drives.

bobbywatson wrote:

Anyone around here has experience with setting up ownCloud or NextCloud? I would like to have something where my files are sync'd across my laptop and my desktop, without having to pay for DropBox or some other cloud service.

My current plan is to use my Raspberry Pi 3 as the server (and storing the files on an external drive, with a nightly batch job to rsync to another external drive).

If your goal is primarily to stay away from Google and Dropbox, consider OneDrive. I have an Office 365 subscription, which costs $70 a year, and I get a terabyte of cloud storage, on top of the Office suite.

Of course, that won't satisfy you if you're looking to avoid those tech giants. But it sure does simplify matters, and doesn't cost nearly as much as you'd think. And you don't have to set up or manage your own hardware. Plus, one of the BIG advantages of paying for this kind of cloud storage is that it's all off-site, meaning I lose nothing if lightning strikes my house, or it burns down. After watching a neighbor's house get gutted a number of years ago, the off-site backup is critical to me.

TheGameguru wrote:

I also have at least 60 hidden Xvd's like others have posted.. you have to find them using Device Manager and select Show Hidden Devices and then look under Disk Drives.

XVD = Xbox Virtual Disk. They're the (mostly) read-only virtual disks containing the games. The number of disks on your system is probably proportional to the number of Game Pass games you've installed on that machine.

Why they get suddenly unmounted during gameplay, who knows. Feels a bit like a DRM check failing.

bobbywatson wrote:

Anyone around here has experience with setting up ownCloud or NextCloud? I would like to have something where my files are sync'd across my laptop and my desktop, without having to pay for DropBox or some other cloud service.

My current plan is to use my Raspberry Pi 3 as the server (and storing the files on an external drive, with a nightly batch job to rsync to another external drive).

I run the NextCloudPI distribution on a RPi3. It works, and I recorded a log of the steps I had to take to get it up and running here, as well as one potentially annoying problem that comes up but has an easy fix.

That said, the OneDrive through Office 365 Subscription (Home/family in my case, granting 1TB to the others as well) is a fantastic deal.

GG, is it possible that the use of virtual disks is stressing your RAM? Or, perhaps, your anti-virus is treating them as real disks and getting overwhelmed?

Robear wrote:

GG, is it possible that the use of virtual disks is stressing your RAM? Or, perhaps, your anti-virus is treating them as real disks and getting overwhelmed?

No idea. I have about 10 game pass games installed and there’s around 80 hidden virtual disks. Seems like Microsoft could have come up with a better process here.

I haven't updated about this in a while but as some of you may recall my computer started bluescreening on me about once or twice a week. Over the last few months I have been trying to figure out what might be causing the issue.

Just a few days ago I bought a 3600x to replace the 3800x I had in the system. I am pretty confident it might be the problem. If not then it could be the motherboard. I am going to try and RMA the CPU if my computer runs stable with the new CPU. I would have bought a 5000 series CPU if I could find one locally. Unfortunately no luck.

Things I have done so far:
Memtest (Ran over night twice no errors)
Pulled out my creative sound card, now using onboard sound
Switched out Video Card.
Plugged PC directly to the wall socket instead of UPS
Ran several OCCT (version 8.01) tests. Tests either passed or immediately started throwing CPU errors.
New CPU (just started)

edit: I ran the OCCT tests that showed CPU errors when I had my 3800x installed and the 3600x showed no errors after a couple of minutes, where as the 3800 would start throwing errors immediately and even crashed the computer. This already leads me to believe I am on the right track.

It's not impossible for CPUs to break, but it's uncommon. The cooling system is a much more likely point of failure. One possibility is that you fixed the crashes by reseating the cooler, for instance, rather than by replacing the chip.

That said, if it works, and you're happy, huzzah. But keep an eye out, the 5600Xs are getting pretty easy to find.

Malor wrote:

But keep an eye out, the 5600Xs are getting pretty easy to find.

Even 5800s have been pretty consistently in stock at various places, including Best Buy (for example).

Maybe in the U.S. but Canada has been a wasteland, if you want MSRP.

The cooling system is a much more likely point of failure. One possibility is that you fixed the crashes by reseating the cooler, for instance, rather than by replacing the chip.

I have a Noctua NH D15, hard to screw up seating with that cooler. Plus the temps were always good. It was the first thing I thought of. Thermal paste looked good when I pulled the cooler off to replace the CPU, so I think I just got extremely unlucky. None of the pins look bent either.

I would expect the power supply more than the CPU, are those two CPUs rated for the same watts?

LeapingGnome wrote:

I would expect the power supply more than the CPU, are those two CPUs rated for the same watts?

3600X has a TDP that's 10 watts lower. I don't think that would make much of a difference. When I did the testing using OCCT, I did more then just CPU and Power tests. I did Memory and GPU tests as well. If I was having power issues I would expect errors there as well, especially with GPU tests but I never did.

And now I am not seeing any errors popping up on OCCT. OCCT also lets you monitor power as well and the graphs always showed a stable voltage.

I mean I could be wrong. Only time will tell, but the initial results looks promising.