Weight loss and weight management catch-all!

mrlogical wrote:

Has anyone tried Hero Trainer? It's just a silly app that syncs with your step trackers (Fitbit or Google Fit app) and gives you points for steps, and you can trade those points in for gift cards from Nintendo, PlayStation, Xbox stores, among other gaming-related options. Not much else to do with the app (there's some thing where you choose a hero avatar that you're leveling up, and there's "quests" and stuff, but it all seems pretty barebones), but earning $10-15 of Xbox or Nintendo cash for a month or two worth of steps seems worth fiddling with? If you give it a try use referral code TH78.

Sounds interesting. Ill give it a spin on your code and see what I think. Cheers.

Has anyone here taken Ozempic or Trulicity? I’m type 2 and my doctor wants to put me on one of these.

Just a rant - my wife and I got totally savaged for our weight yesterday. I know it’s not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but it sucks that this is still such an acceptable if not encouraged form of bigotry. Also, I feel utterly demoralized despite finally hitting the gym 3 days a week. It’s like what’s the point I know everyone talks sh*t behind my back.

f*ck haters. Awesome on hitting gym 3x week!

jdzappa wrote:

Just a rant - my wife and I got totally savaged for our weight yesterday. I know it’s not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but it sucks that this is still such an acceptable if not encouraged form of bigotry. Also, I feel utterly demoralized despite finally hitting the gym 3 days a week. It’s like what’s the point I know everyone talks sh*t behind my back.

f*ck 'em.

You aren't going to the gym for those f*cknuggets, you're going to the gym for you.

Thanks guys. I’m a bit more calm after a friend of a conservative friend on social media made a rape joke about my wife then walked it back by saying “it’s a joke dude nobody would bang that heifer unless they’re into bestiality.” As predicted Twitter hasn’t done sh*t about my complaint.

At any rate, if anyone’s interested in Orange Theory it’s one heck of a workout. I’m seeing some progress but Jesus I need to lose 30 pounds and it’s so f*cking hard.

Screw the haters jdzappa. It's the folks just starting out on their fitness journey that I have the most respect for. Takes more drive and discipline to start from scratch that it is to add another inch on your biceps and pose in the mirror.

Thanks Heretk. What sucks is I was actually doing really well before quarantine. 2-3 days of Taekwondo and a couple days weight training. This last year has sucked between my job turning into a 12 hour slog plus all the homeschooling BS. I still did walks and push-ups but it was tough to stay motivated. Feel good I’m getting back into it.

For what it’s worth jdzappa, I’m proud of your efforts.

When someone gives you sh*t about your weight, they're not calling you fat, they're calling themself an asshole.

Jonman wrote:

When someone gives you sh*t about your weight, they're not calling you fat, they're calling themself an asshole.

As always love your style Jonman.

On a positIve note I will start posting progress reports. I could use the accountability and will be rooting for the rest of you too.

Jonman wrote:

When someone gives you sh*t about your weight, they're not calling you fat, they're calling themself an asshole.

I love this.

jdzappa wrote:

Just a rant - my wife and I got totally savaged for our weight yesterday. I know it’s not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but it sucks that this is still such an acceptable if not encouraged form of bigotry. Also, I feel utterly demoralized despite finally hitting the gym 3 days a week. It’s like what’s the point I know everyone talks sh*t behind my back.

Murder should be legal for people like this. Like really, what's so awful in their life that they feel it's acceptable to denigrate others at such a childish level? "You're fat, ha ha!"

Vrikk wrote:
jdzappa wrote:

Just a rant - my wife and I got totally savaged for our weight yesterday. I know it’s not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but it sucks that this is still such an acceptable if not encouraged form of bigotry. Also, I feel utterly demoralized despite finally hitting the gym 3 days a week. It’s like what’s the point I know everyone talks sh*t behind my back.

Murder should be legal for people like this. Like really, what's so awful in their life that they feel it's acceptable to denigrate others at such a childish level? "You're fat, ha ha!"

Oh it was a graphic rape threat that got walked back with a fat joke which really got to me.

But hey on the plus side, with the nicer weather I’m doing a morning and evening walk. I need to hammer down on my drinking though - spent Saturday hung over which is not a good feeling in your mid 40s.

I've been working with a dietitian for almost two years now and have some mixed feelings about it. I like her, her advice sounds good and makes sense, I like having the accountability of checking in every month and seeing how I'm doing and talking about challenges and how I'm approaching food. And I've gone from the low carb diet I was on for about a decade (basically I went to a dietitian because my trusty low carb diet that I'd just get extra serious about every time my weight started to creep up was just not helping me lose weight anymore, so I figured I should see what else there was to try) to now eating a really nice range of all types of food, eating 2100 calories a day, eating a healthy amount of carbs, not freaking out if every once in a while I take the kids out for ice cream and have some with them too. All of that is great! But also...my weight is almost exactly the same as it was when I started. :-/

To be fair A)I had been down at least 5 pounds or so pre-pandemic, and for the first 4 months of the pandemic when life was a disaster and I wasn't seeing the dietitian, I was not eating healthily ("let's bake bread!" "let's make cookies!" "let's make pancakes!") so I gained maybe 8 pounds back that I have mostly lost since resuming eating healthy and seeing the dietitian, and B)part of the weigh-in process at the dietitian is they do a body composition test, and so every time I come in thinking my weight has been flat or only minorly improved, usually she ends up telling me that yeah I only lost a pound this month, but I lost something like 4 pounds of fat while gaining 3 pounds of muscle, so it's much better than it appears on my scale alone. And the change in lifestyle is a genuine benefit--being able to have a sandwich whenever I feel like it and eating an occasional treat without worrying that I've ruined my low carb diet is a real positive. But still, it's hard to look at the graph of the past 2 years and understand it as success, even if intellectually I can support that view.

This past month I've been working really hard on pumping up my exercise. Previously I've just been taking a good long slightly brisk walk 4-5 days a week, but at the start of this month I got a kettlebell and three days a week am doing weight training stuff, the other two days a week doing ab workouts, and all five of those days I've gone from just walking to doing intermittent runs throughout the walks. Again, I'm noticing what feels like real progress--my muscles feel productively but not unreasonably sore, I feel like I'm getting stronger, the run parts of my walk-runs are getting longer and are getting easier for me, my fitbit even reports that my resting heart rate has dropped a few bpms over the last couple of weeks. All of that seems great! Yet I step on the scale and see the same damn number. I go for a weigh-in next week and will be interested to hear what she says. Perhaps I've gained a noticeable amount of muscle while losing fat? Perhaps with my higher calorie burn I'll need to eat more? (She's pretty focused on metabolic effects, our first meeting was all about how I was really not eating enough, that eating 1700-1800 calories a day just meant my body clung harder to all my fat, which made sense even if it's not consistent with the traditional "lose weight by eating less and exercising more" mindset).

Finding motivation is really hard sometimes. I am working so hard and doing all the right things and my weight just sits there. I'm 6' tall and 250 pounds and eating 2100 calories a day of healthy food and working out for 50-60 minutes a day 5 days a week and working with a dietitian. If none of that is enough to make a difference... Argh. Just gotta keep my head down and keep working and focus on the progress I am making and be patient that eventually I'll start to see some changes on that bottom line weight number too. But it's hard.

Sounds you're doing awesome work. If nothing else (I doubt there will be nothing else) your body will be getting stronger, which is never a bad thing. I feel like plateauing is a very common thing in weight loss, so give it time.

Hi folks. I guess I'm going to be hanging out here for a while. I'm in my mid-40s, and have been having blood pressure spikes from time to time, and on one such instance, I ended up in the ER just as a precaution. Nothing wrong with my heart, they say, but as doctors are prone to, "You may want to work on dropping a few pounds and doing some more cardio exercise moving forward."

"A few" apparently means 30.

So I'm starting with the easy: meal journals and calorie tracking. Having to write down what I eat has essentially eliminated snacking, which given my proclivity for sweet snacks has, I'm sure, cut way back on sugars and calories in my intake.

But I'm feeling really hungry most of the time. Probably not actually hungry; it's probably that my body is accustomed to a couple of snacks between meals, and I'm hoping that the longer I stick with this, the less I'll feel it.

Great job getting started!

I frequently come back to this video when I'm looking for a refresher on being more mindful about my relationship with food. I now track how many times I grab snacks and liquid calorie bevs, shooting for 0. YMMV.

Feegle wrote:

But I'm feeling really hungry most of the time. Probably not actually hungry; it's probably that my body is accustomed to a couple of snacks between meals, and I'm hoping that the longer I stick with this, the less I'll feel it.

It might seem counterintuitive, but 16/8 intermittent fasting really helped me with that feeling of hunger. That's where you designate an 8-hour window (mine's 11am-7pm) in which you're allowed to eat, and fast the other 16 hours a day. It's considered one of the better IF routines for beginners.

Doing it really helped teach me the difference between actually feeling hungry, and just wanting the sensory stimulation of eating or feeling it because it's routine. At first that last couple hours between 9am and 11am was torture, but I also noticed that if I was in the middle of something and couldn't eat until 11:30am or noon, the hungry feeling went away even though I hadn't eaten. It wasn't that I was necessarily hungry (especially if I'd had a big meal right at the end of my eating period the night before), my body was just accustomed to food at that time. And I could choose to indulge that, or not.

Also of course your stomach shrinks if you do that for long enough.

Standard disclaimer that I'm not a health care professional, everyone's different, talk it over with your doctor etc. etc. etc., but it might be something to try.

Something else that helped me with cravings for sweets: I went to the store and bought a bar of 60% dark chocolate, a bar of 70%, 80%, 90%, and 100% (which can be hard to find; they carry them at Trader Joe's in AZ, and you can also get them on Amazon).

When I got that craving for sweets, I'd give myself a little square, and I'd go progressively darker / less sweet every time. Past a certain point, I believe I successfully broke the link in my brain between chocolate and pleasure. (-:

Thanks, folks. I have a tendency to hit new experiences hard and stick with them for a couple of weeks, after which I lose interest and focus. I'm going to try really hard not to let that happen this time.

As it happens, there's a "healthy lifestyle" group starting up at work this Monday, so I also have that going on for me. Their program is slated to run for 5 weeks, and it gamifies a lot of the process; hopefully that's going to help me too. The focus is on changing habits (drink more water, eat more veggies, that kind of stuff.)

I also made a conscious effort to get more vegetables into the house for next week when I shopped this morning. Hoping that having fruit and veg in the fridge will give me something I can snack on when I'm feeling hungry. Frankly, I need the fibre.

TL;DR: Noom worked for me. I lost over 30 lbs. since January and am in the best shape and health I've been in over 15 years.

Robear wrote:

Well, so I answered Farley about Noom in pm. Short story, 12 pounds down in a bit over 6 months, hit a sort of steady state for a few months, and just in the last few days starting losing again, after getting an injection that wiped out some painful bursitis and improved my walking/exercise and sleep capabilities. TL;DR - Give it a shot, it's a great system that helps you deal mentally with the issues related to weight loss, not just gives you the tools to do it.

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Yes. I had lost some weight in the year before I started, but not for a few months. I dropped about 7 pounds in 2 months with Noom, then plateaued. A lot of folks in my group did better, but I was under stress from various sources. But I had hit the weight I was in 2004, which is a good start. And last week, I got rid of some chronic pain and I'm dropping again. Very excited.

Noom starts you out with big principles, and compensations to help you put them into effect. Then each week it explores one or two of them in detail, adding all sorts of techniques you can use to implement them. It provides you with tracking systems for your weight and food intake and exercise. It gives you a group of people who started when you did and are sharing the experience, so you have folks to talk to. And every day there's an exercise or two that you can do to help cement the things you've learned.

They really do use CBT methods in the program, and that helps a lot. Not only do you change habits and develop new ones, but it supports you when you do it. You have a personal guide you can text with, and there's the group, which also has its own facilitator. So it's like having a nutritionist and a psychologist on-call to answer questions and help you figure ways to cope when you're having issues.

Eventually, they throw the kitchen sink at you, which is a great thing. The reason is that you'll find that some things you learn will work well for you, and some won't, so the more tricks and tips and data you get, the more you can build something that works for you as the program goes on. It's awesome in that regard. You'll craft your own changes and make them work, without judgement by anyone else, just support. If you miss a bit, or you gain weight, or you have trouble getting into a groove, well, tomorrow's another day. They constantly remind you that no one ever just loses weight. Even with strong lifestyle changes, your weight will fluctuate. The important thing is to not give up and let the food compensate for the weight gain that leads to giving up, if that makes sense. And they do a great job of it.

I'm in the situation now where, in the last two years, I've gone from 245 to 215. I started Noom at about 227 (okay, hmmm, that's more than 7 pounds since December, isn't it? More like 12 at this point.). My blood pressure is pretty normal; it started high but I have greatly reduced my salt, sugar and caffeine intake. Inflammation of my legs is gone (it wasn't terrible, but it was consistent and worrying). I'm not constantly feeling full, so I can work out for 5 or 10 minute sessions when I can get them, during the day (they have a whole library of exercises, bodyweight and otherwise, and teach the HIT exercise method). My endurance is up, my steps per day have doubled even after walking the dogs, and I'm getting ready to start a regular MA class again. And as I said, since I got rid of a spot of bursitis, and I've got this nice system of eating much more healthy stuff I fix myself going, my desire to snack is way down and I'm losing again.

I love this program. It's easy, it's friendly, it teaches you how to make it work and then you can sort it out in your own head. I am very impressed.

I think they have a four or six month program? Mine was not very expensive. Also, some companies will pay you to do the program, or at least repay you. You should check that.

Good luck whatever you choose!

Hi all. I'll add to Robear's post from two years ago and say that Noom worked for me.

I started in mid-January at 200lbs., and lost 30 lbs. by mid-April. Since then I've been transitioning to maintenance, and focusing on body composition, trying to replace some of the last stubborn fat with muscle while I approach my final goal weight of 165lbs. this month.

What works to keep me disciplined is tracking my weight and calories daily, as well as exercise. The Noom lessons and the coaches and community are helpful to establish and stick to a plan that works for you.

For me, cutting out processed carbs and sugar and replacing them with fruit and veggies was the most effective diet change. I also committed to an indoor bike workout over the winter and moved to biking outside when it got warmer. My resting heart rate, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers are excellent and last week my doctored agreed I can stop taking my statin as a test run to see if I can maintain on my own without medication.

I plan to transition to MyFitnessPal next month for tracking calories, weight, and exercise.

Finally, I'll say the best tool I bought to help the journey was a smart scale that measures body composition in addition to accurate weight. We bought a Withings Body+, which connects via Wi-Fi, and allows you to view trends on a mobile app.

Good luck to all on your journey.

I started on the journey back to fitness(or something resembling it) in mid December. In a perfect world I should get my 250 down to 180(6'2" frame), but sub 200 is the goal. Fell off for 48 days(my last run logged). I stepped on the scale last night after my first run back and the associated app wanted to confirm it was me, since there was so much variation with my last weigh-in(48 days ago).

Back to calorie monitoring and weeknight runs.

I've sort of backed myself in to finally trying to get in better shape after hanging out around 210lbs for several years. I had some combination of intense anxiety and medical stuff going on end of 2020 to early this year that landed me with very low appetite for a month or so, during which I cut out just about anything that seemed like a possible trigger for digestive issues or anxiety before gradually adding things back in. We've tried to tailor our meal planning around those triggers. Mostly we're doing lower fat, more fish, less meat, tons of vegetables, less dairy, and less processed carbs if not necessarily less of them overall. Headed toward something like the flexitarian diet, though we'd lean harder into it if it weren't for kids. Cut my alcohol consumption way back from 2020 levels, and no more coffee for me - that might be the hardest adjustment, but the anxiety connection seems pretty clear. I also went from mostly sedentary to walking at least 30 minutes daily. Since those changes I've felt loads better and have gradually dropped to 175lbs, though aside from my doctor being happier about my BMI, I'm much more focused on feeling good overall than that number going down. It's a great feeling to finally pull down that box of clothes that I packed away 15 years ago and find that some of them fit again.

There are definitely some challenges on the horizon. My wife has once again resumed her baking business, which is going great but means more opportunities to indulge. So far I've been feeling good enough about my efforts that it hasn't been hard to resist, but I'm not sure how well I'll deal with that under stress. It helps that we're doing this thing together, but I worry about slipping and I think back to the bad old days when I always had a cache of goodies hidden away for surreptitious late night self-sabotage. Also, fire swamp season is rapidly approaching here, which means I need to change up the lunchtime walk habit that has been so good for me mentally and physically, or figure out how to keep it up without returning to the office as a walking puddle of sweat.

benign1 wrote:

I'm much more focused on feeling good overall than that number going down.

This is the way.

What is fire swamp season?

Heretk wrote:

What is fire swamp season?

That would be the unremittingly dense, buggy sauna that is summer here in the once and future swamp of Houston.

Well. Signed up for a 210km bike ride that is 6 months away. Hopefully that looming in the future will help me with motivation to train.