This Old #%&@*$ House

I've had a Whirlpool dishwasher for the past 10-15 years, and while it's never broken down or anything, it does a really subpar job at actually washing dishes. Especially pasta sauce - it just spreads that stuff over the other dishes, and I end up with dried sauce crumbles everywhere. I think I'll look into getting a Bosch.

Top_Shelf wrote:

Any dishwasher recommendations from the collective here?

Consumer Reports had a Bosch model ranked #1 that I'm leaning toward but wanted to see what other here think about brands, installs, and anything else we should consider?

For context, this house is 20 years old, is our first home and the dishwasher came with the house. So I've never bought one before.

I watched a maintenance guy video say from his standpoint, a pair of Bosch models would be his #1&2 picks with nothing else even close.

He also generally swore off anything Samsung, ESPECIALLY their washing machines as the spider gear (gizmo, spider-whatever) would always break around 3 years and was a pain to deal with.

EDIT: Found the video:

Pretty much the only thing Samsung I own is a television.

I used to be a die-hard Samsung TV advocate, but the LG OLED sets are just absolutely stunning.

I got two Bosch and a Viking. I think Bosch is better. Top rack is annoying but easily removable.

mrtomaytohead wrote:
Top_Shelf wrote:

Any dishwasher recommendations from the collective here?

Consumer Reports had a Bosch model ranked #1 that I'm leaning toward but wanted to see what other here think about brands, installs, and anything else we should consider?

For context, this house is 20 years old, is our first home and the dishwasher came with the house. So I've never bought one before.

I watched a maintenance guy video say from his standpoint, a pair of Bosch models would be his #1&2 picks with nothing else even close.

He also generally swore off anything Samsung, ESPECIALLY their washing machines as the spider gear (gizmo, spider-whatever) would always break around 3 years and was a pain to deal with.

EDIT: Found the video:

Yeah, our Samsung washing machine broke mid-cycle and we are done with them as an appliance brand. I don't even look at them for TVs anymore either.

I have an LG washer and dryer that I adore. I'm only getting rid of them because the dryer is gas and our house does not have a gas hookup. And my wife demands a matched set so I can't just keep the washer.

In the new to us house there is/was textured wallpaper in the living room ceiling that needs to go before we can have a plasterer skim the ceiling (and walls). We’ve taken a steamer and most of it has just come away. Under it there seems to be a couple of coats of emulsion paint. Do we need to remove that too before it can be skimmed? Obviously where the steamer has flaked/bubbled the paint, it needs to go and that is easy to sandpaper away but do we need to go after the more solid patches?

So garage door issue. Relatively simple door, Genie 2035. Wouldn't close today, so my wife pulled the release chain, opened it manually, and now I can't get the carriage to re-engage with the door bracket. The opener operates, but the chain passes through the bracket, and I can't get it to pop up more. When I get up on a ladder and look into the bracket with a flashlight, the little lever at the top of the pull chain is basically level with the bottom of the bracket, and I can't get the damn thing to move up to engage.

Any thoughts? On my other door, I just pull the release cord towards the door itself for it to audibly click and re-engage, but I can't get this damn one to move.

Edit: Aaaaaand five minutes after posting, it occurred to me that I should replace "doing it the way I think it should work" with "doing it the way I think it should work, but with a little WD-40", and, hey, the stupid bracket thing that was stuck is no longer stuck, and the door works. Big "duh" moment.

Most garage door releases like that will lock open so you can use the door freely without it re-latching in situations where, for example, the opener is just flat-out broken. In order to get it to latch again, you can just pull down on the release a second time and it will release that lock.

Yep, and I think it was a combination of some grime as well as just being damn frozen because Minnesota this week; the latch just wouldn't go all, so it just took some scraping and work to get the damn thing to free up. Very frustrating for what should have been a super-brief thing.

Agent 86 wrote:

I have an LG washer and dryer that I adore. I'm only getting rid of them because the dryer is gas and our house does not have a gas hookup. And my wife demands a matched set so I can't just keep the washer. :(

If you want to keep the dryer, adding a new gas line to the laundry room will almost certainly be significantly cheaper than buying new appliances. If you've got a crawlspace or unfinished basement with easy access to the gas line, it could be pretty inexpensive overall.

When it comes to garage door openers if you are looking to get a new one I learned a couple years ago that newer ones don't work with older car's built in openers. My 2012 Infiniti could not open the new Liftmaster I got in 2020 because the opener security technology changed. Apparently Liftmaster sold a bridge device for a while but I wasn't able to locate one. I live in an area where you shouldn't leave openers on the visor (or risk a break in) so it kind of sucks having to open the center console and fumble around. Having WiFi with it is nice though.

My 2022 vehicle has no problems with it.

I took that to mean there was no gas service in the area, not just that there's no line in the laundry room.

NSMike's got it. I'm rural so the only way I can get gas is to have a tank installed(my wife would want buried if that's possible) and all the piping run from it to the house. That's a pretty hefty cost to keep the dryer.

PoderOmega wrote:

When it comes to garage door openers if you are looking to get a new one I learned a couple years ago that newer ones don't work with older car's built in openers. My 2012 Infiniti could not open the new Liftmaster I got in 2020 because the opener security technology changed. Apparently Liftmaster sold a bridge device for a while but I wasn't able to locate one. I live in an area where you shouldn't leave openers on the visor (or risk a break in) so it kind of sucks having to open the center console and fumble around. Having WiFi with it is nice though.

My 2022 vehicle has no problems with it.

Check out Meross garage door openers. Not sure if you are an Apple guy but it connects to Homekit so you can just tell Siri to open the door when you get close. I believe it works on Android as well. It works really well, is compatible with most (guessing here) garage door openers.

DeThroned wrote:
PoderOmega wrote:

When it comes to garage door openers if you are looking to get a new one I learned a couple years ago that newer ones don't work with older car's built in openers. My 2012 Infiniti could not open the new Liftmaster I got in 2020 because the opener security technology changed. Apparently Liftmaster sold a bridge device for a while but I wasn't able to locate one. I live in an area where you shouldn't leave openers on the visor (or risk a break in) so it kind of sucks having to open the center console and fumble around. Having WiFi with it is nice though.

My 2022 vehicle has no problems with it.

Check out Meross garage door openers. Not sure if you are an Apple guy but it connects to Homekit so you can just tell Siri to open the door when you get close. I believe it works on Android as well. It works really well, is compatible with most (guessing here) garage door openers.

I have a Liftmaster with MyQ.

Just need to download the MyQ app and pair it. Was pretty simple. Have been using it for over a year and no issues - other than the MyQ app displaying unwanted ads for their products in their app from time-to-time.

Yeah I have MyQ app, so I guess I could fumble around with my phone instead of an opener. Looks like it may have some integration ability though.

But really it was only a pain for a year until we got our 2022 vehicle. My wife mainly drives the Infiniti once or twice a week and she's not complaining about it.

New washer and dryer have arrived. Got em in, went to plug the dryer in.....and did you know starting in 1996 that dryers were mandated to have 4 prong plugs instead of 3 so they have a true ground? I do now. The joys of a 100 year old house.

Off to the internet to explore my options.

Huh, I knew there were 3 or 4 prong plugs, but I never knew it was based on construction code after a certain date.

Reminds me of when our microwave died a few years after we moved in. It was mounted to the cabinets and it was only when I tried to remove it that I realized that the previous owner CUT OFF THE PLUG from the microwave and wired it directly into the wall.

Had to have an electrician install a proper outlet.

PaladinTom wrote:

Reminds me of when our microwave died a few years after we moved in. It was mounted to the cabinets and it was only when I tried to remove it that I realized that the previous owner CUT OFF THE PLUG from the microwave and wired it directly into the wall.

Had to have an electrician install a proper outlet.

We had a similar issue where they had used an extension cord to wire the microwave to a junction box that was drywalled in. The extension they put in was also connected to an outlet in the garage and the stove. The breaker wasn't rated for the full draw of the stove let alone two other outlets. When we redid the kitchen we found that all of the plastic sheathing on the electrical cord inside the covered box had completely melted away and the cord running from the box to the microwave outlet was black and brittle. Electrician (who was thankfully a friend of mine) said that it should have caused a fire long ago. We redid ALL of the electrical in the kitchen but it's no wonder we could never run the stove and microwave at the same time.

When we remodeled our house (a circa 1920's build) we redid the electrical. Our electrician found a "knob and tube" circuit from the original build still live up in the attic.

When we had some electrical work done on our house, the electrician had to go into the breaker box, and he told us that we needed to change all the breakers. According to code up here in Quebec, if you have your panel from Manufacturer X, all of your breakers have to be from Manufacturer X. None of ours matched, which would have resulted in serious issues with our insurance company if something happened.

Not sure how common it is for a house built in 2000 but our sink disposal was directly wired in. When we added a touchless kitchen faucet they had to wire a normal 2 gang plug junction box under the sink. It wasn't a big deal but was just one more cost and seemed weird to me.

PoderOmega wrote:

Not sure how common it is for a house built in 2000 but our sink disposal was directly wired in.

Maybe disposals don't have plugs? The cheap ones I've bought at Lowe's over the years don't.

Also, IANA contractor, but I suspect you wouldn't want to have an electrical outlet all that close to the plumbing.

Enix wrote:
PoderOmega wrote:

Not sure how common it is for a house built in 2000 but our sink disposal was directly wired in.

Maybe disposals don't have plugs? The cheap ones I've bought at Lowe's over the years don't.

Also, IANA contractor, but I suspect you wouldn't want to have an electrical outlet all that close to the plumbing.

I dunno. I bought a house last year and our inspector seemed to do a pretty thorough job, pointed out many things that weren't up to code. Didn't have a thing to say about the outlet for the disposal under the sink.

Outlets under sinks are normal. I replaced my disposal last year with one I bought at Costco, and it had a plug. I suspect newer homes and disposals all just use a standard plug. I would presume code just requires the outlet to be up higher in the under-sink cabinet, and be connected to a GCFI somewhere in the kitchen for additional safety.