This Old #%&@*$ House

If I do pull the trigger (I'm 90% there), I will get the edger, too. I may get the leaf-blower, too, but I'm not sure.

My yard is so small, I shouldn't have problems with the batteries, even after they start losing their life a little, but having backups is always great. My friend has an EGO mower with the same size battery as I plan on getting, and he does his lawn almost twice before needing to charge and he swaps batteries like you were mentioning since he has all 3 of those EGO tools.

My problem is I have a really nice gas mower ($450 Toro) and a really nice edger ($300 Stihl) and neither are that old. I also have a plug-in blower that I never use except to blow dust and sawdust out of my garage. It's hard to replace things when you have good working items, already.

A new neighbor moved from an apartment so he and his wife don't have any lawn equipment. So, I'm justifying the EGO purchase(s) by telling myself I will sell my old gas stuff to him on the cheap if he wants it. Or, they will go on CList/FBook MrktPl.

A local auction house is doing an online auction of multiple estates next week. There is a "New In Box"EGO Edger in it that I am going to bid on if it passes my inspection. I'm going to check it out Monday. I can't exactly tell which model it is by the pictures of the box because they suck at taking pictures. I've narrowed it down to 3 based on the battery size and the "Powerload" feature.

-BEP

Still searching for houses, so no new yard care purchases for me until I see what I get.

And it's still brutal out there. We haven't been outbid on anything since the last time (15k), but that's still the best house we've looked at the last two months, and right now I think I would have tossed another 15k extra down just to be done with this mess.

But we'll see... definitely the spring rush seems to be over and houses are lasting a few more days on the market here. Just a matter of finding the right one for us.

Stele wrote:

Still searching for houses, so no new yard care purchases for me until I see what I get.

And it's still brutal out there. We haven't been outbid on anything since the last time (15k), but that's still the best house we've looked at the last two months, and right now I think I would have tossed another 15k extra down just to be done with this mess.

But we'll see... definitely the spring rush seems to be over and houses are lasting a few more days on the market here. Just a matter of finding the right one for us.

Hang in there! Be grateful you're not trying to move to Oregon! Housing is sooooo bad here. The market is just jaw droppingly bad. Climate change flight seems to be a pretty big thing... Oregon is sitting as a pretty good spot for that.

UpToIsomorphism wrote:

I got an EGO last year and I love it. The only problem is the battery is slowly dying (last year I could get about an hour with a full charge, now it is about 45 minutes).

I would recommend it, but I would also try to get a second battery. I have an EGO leaf blower and weed eater and all the batteries are compatible with each device, so if the mower battery dies, I charge it while I mow with one of the two smaller ones.

That is strange. I have had my Ego mower for three years and haven’t noticed a battery difference, but my yard does take less than a full charge to do. Do you store your batteries inside in the winter or in some other heated space? If not, maybe that had an impact.

On electric lawnmowers, blowers, and whatnot, I am all in on Stihl. Really nice products.

Possibly not a thing for your enormous American yards but I use a plug-in electric mower (no battery, runs off the mains) with an extension cord. It will run forever and other than not mowing when the grass is wet, I can see no downside. Back garden is 20m x 11m so not tiny.

DoveBrown wrote:

Possibly not a thing for your enormous American yards but I use a plug-in electric mower (no battery, runs off the mains) with an extension cord. It will run forever and other than not mowing when the grass is wet, I can see no downside. Back garden is 20m x 11m so not tiny.

Those are definitely a thing here too, but as you've said, not quite as useful on larger yards. Still great for small ones though.

Yeah I have a plug in trimmer and 100ft extension cord. It reaches the mailbox and it reaches the side fence in the back. Good enough

UpToIsomorphism wrote:

I got an EGO last year and I love it. The only problem is the battery is slowly dying (last year I could get about an hour with a full charge, now it is about 45 minutes).

I would recommend it, but I would also try to get a second battery. I have an EGO leaf blower and weed eater and all the batteries are compatible with each device, so if the mower battery dies, I charge it while I mow with one of the two smaller ones.

I’ve had an EGO for several years now and haven’t noticed any major battery degradation. They do say not to store it in the charger though and I leave it at 25% or so. I mow the lawn then just let it rest till the next time I need it. Then just plug it in a half hour before I mow.

Chaz wrote:

I'm looking at the Ryobi models that take their 18v batteries. I've already got a wad of them, and can probably live with the smaller size and lower run time.

That's exactly what I did. I picked up the Ryobi model that uses the two 18V batteries. It was like $90 or something, but it came with two of the 4Ah Ryobi batteries that I can also use with all of my tools.

astralplaydoh wrote:
Chaz wrote:

I'm looking at the Ryobi models that take their 18v batteries. I've already got a wad of them, and can probably live with the smaller size and lower run time.

That's exactly what I did. I picked up the Ryobi model that uses the two 18V batteries. It was like $90 or something, but it came with two of the 4Ah Ryobi batteries that I can also use with all of my tools.

In our second year of using ryobi mower, blower and trimmer. Love it. No complaints taking care of our moderate sized lot.

My townhouse is literally three years old tomorrow and I just noticed a water stain in the ceiling of one of the upstairs bedrooms. Looks like I have a roof leak. Called the builder who said "so sad. One year warranty. GFY.".

That doesn't seem right, does it?

Lots of shingle manufacturers warranty their products for the life of the product. Many modern asphalt shingles are supposedly a 50-year lifespan. Maybe if you can find out the product, call them? They might be able to lean on the builder.

Paleocon wrote:

My townhouse is literally three years old tomorrow and I just noticed a water stain in the ceiling of one of the upstairs bedrooms. Looks like I have a roof leak. Called the builder who said "so sad. One year warranty. GFY.".

That doesn't seem right, does it?

I imagine it's exactly per the paperwork you signed when you bought the house, no?

Paleocon wrote:

My townhouse is literally three years old tomorrow and I just noticed a water stain in the ceiling of one of the upstairs bedrooms. Looks like I have a roof leak. Called the builder who said "so sad. One year warranty. GFY.".

That doesn't seem right, does it?

I'd definitely dig out the warranty and read the fine print.

We had a water stain show up a few years ago. Went in the attic and it turns out it was directly under one of the bathroom vent pipes. Apparently, the rubber boots that surround those on the roof tend to degrade and water leaks in around them. It's fairly easily replaced. Might want to see if the stain lines up with one of those.

The reason shingle manufacturers have 50 year warranties is because most of the time the issue isn't the shingles themselves but the million other mistakes that can cause water intrusions. So definitely hit up the warranty if it is the shingles but don't count on it.

Do you have an HOA? Do they cover insurance for the walls out? They may be responsible for it. Had that happen when I lived in a townhome and we had water damage in our garage due to failed shingles. HoA's insurance had to pay to replace the shingles as well as repair the water damage.

Unless the roof was installed properly, the builder may be right. When we got our house built in 2015, we noticed an issue with the hardiplank siding. Long story short, they didn't install it correctly and the planks were not secure in the studs. Because it was 10 months into our first year, we had them remove all the siding, have someone from hardiplank come to the house and supervise them installing it correctly.

If it was left the way it was and we didn't notice an issue, if we had problems down the road, the warranty was void because it wasn't installed properly. Now, we have the full warranty period.

I have my fingers crossed that your roof was installed properly but just a 1 yr warranty on the roof doesn't sound right at all. Good luck!

PoderOmega wrote:

The reason shingle manufacturers have 50 year warranties is because most of the time the issue isn't the shingles themselves but the million other mistakes that can cause water intrusions. So definitely hit up the warranty if it is the shingles but don't count on it.

Yeah, my suggestion was made in the hope that you could get the manufacturer to pressure the builder into fixing it. But, if you get a rep from the shingles company to say the roofer installed them incorrectly, and thus voided the warranty, might that be grounds for a lawsuit against the builder? Both to repair the damage and because they sabotaged a warranty through incompetence?

I learned something new about home telephone (POTS/landline) wiring and wired security systems. It turns out it is common for the alarm system to not be run in series with the phone lines (street->security->phone), but route back to the outside/street box before returning to feed the phone system (street->security->street->phone).

My house was built in 2001 with a standard wired security system installed. I am replacing the old system with a DIY solution from Konnected, to support cloud/app notifications and smart home integration.

When I disconnected and removed the old boards, I no longer had dial tone on my landline phones (Xfinity cable phone service wired into my old POTS panel). This was perplexing because there was only one phone wire coming into the box, and none going out to connect to the phone panel. I assumed they were independent and could be safely disengaged without affecting each other.

Once I learned of the wiring path I chose the easiest solution: connect the two pairs of exposed wires on the disconnected phone wire in the security panel. This completed the circuit and all was well. The other option would have been to bypass the security wire run at the street box.

I'm planning to migrate my landline to Google Voice this year to keep the old number. It was nice having a high-quality POTS-style phone option when the kids were young, but I know I'm in a shrinking minority still having it around. Get off my lawn.

JLS wrote:

When I disconnected and removed the old boards, I no longer had dial tone on my landline phones (Xfinity cable phone service wired into my old POTS panel). This was perplexing because there was only one phone wire coming into the box, and none going out to connect to the phone panel. I assumed they were independent and could be safely disengaged without affecting each other.

That's pretty standard. I hated setting up alarms when I worked for Comcast, but the way we did it is to tie Line 1 from the eMTA into an unused pair in the house, and find that signal down at the alarm. You tie that into the input of the alarm, then tie the output into Line 1 of the same wire which back feeds to the house. So you create eMTA > Alarm > House and only need the one wire coming in.

Heretk wrote:
astralplaydoh wrote:
Chaz wrote:

I'm looking at the Ryobi models that take their 18v batteries. I've already got a wad of them, and can probably live with the smaller size and lower run time.

That's exactly what I did. I picked up the Ryobi model that uses the two 18V batteries. It was like $90 or something, but it came with two of the 4Ah Ryobi batteries that I can also use with all of my tools.

In our second year of using ryobi mower, blower and trimmer. Love it. No complaints taking care of our moderate sized lot.

I love Ryobi tools, but after using the 40V 21" mower for a couple years I had to give up on it. My yard is already too big for it (0.57 acre), but I was having to leap-frog a 6AH and two 4AH batteries on the chargers to get the yard cut, and would take me about 4-5 hours.

And then I had both of my 4AH batteries die... the first was because my older son left one out in the rain, and then the second one just stopped connecting to anything, and wouldn't discharge. Surprisingly, my wife bought me a nice replacement mower. I cut my front and side yards yesterday in about 30 minutes. The back yard takes me about 45 minutes. The only problem I've had so far is that my yard holds a lot of water so turning tears the grass up a bit in places, but right now I'm OK with it as my grass was about 4' tall from not having a working mower for the past couple months.