Ferguson, Missouri

BUT YOU DON'T EVEN KNOW HIS NAME!?!

garion333 wrote:

BUT YOU DON'T EVEN KNOW HIS NAME!?!

Honestly? I barely watch the show, it's on when I go downstairs because my mom is basically what Patton Oswalt describes when he talked about his now-deceased (still sad) wife couldn't watch The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly because it was tooooooo violent, but could then switch over to a true crime show or police procedural where rapist/murderer killed like 20 people and let's talk about how.

That or shows about tiny houses, because apparently we all want one now.

White victim. Expect an indictment.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

White victim. Expect an indictment.

My money's on "They thought he was throwing gang signs at the officers."

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:

White victim. Expect an indictment.

My money's on "They thought he was throwing gang signs at the officers."

Signing the Killing Word.

He was clearly trying to cast Finger of Death.

Dude died, probably not having a single idea wtf was happening.

LarryC wrote:

He was clearly trying to cast Finger of Death.

So the cop targeted the darkness with magic missile.

Again, dude died.

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:

White victim. Expect an indictment.

My money's on "They thought he was throwing gang signs at the officers."

"Furtive movement."

But yes, Robear is correct. A man is dead for absolutely no discernable reason.

DSGamer wrote:

Really sad thing... Whenever I see that this thread has new unread comments I worry that someone else has been killed. :(

Thing is, you're probably right, even if it's not getting attention.

Jayhawker wrote:

In the show's defense, it not only acknowledges how problematic gaining confessions is, the last two seasons were dedicated to investigations into her improper conduct, which eventually led to her leaving her position.

The show was then rebranded as Major Crimes, with a former IA officer leading the division, with a focus on following the law and all regulations. The department now calls in city attorney's to monitor their interrogations regularly.

While The Closer was excellent, Major Crimes has become an important show, in terms of social commentary on a variety of issues, in particular gender and sexual preference. It handles these from a very progressive perspective.

Last arc I saw any of, they were really riding hard on people being guilty and declaring the local pastor trying to help the community to be a "cop killer" because he wasn't turning people in, or something. It went in my "stunningly unreflective" category.

The Wire isn't the only show (and I think it takes a show—movies need to end too soon and too cleanly, generally) that's tried to handle this well. I think Hill Street Blues first blazed that trail, and it's bled into some of the non-cop shows that are set in fairly bad areas. Hospitals, firefighters, and teachers really are doing a lot of good work to help the roughest areas—and it's probably worth remembering that those roles provide far better archetypes for this work than the Cowboy Sheriff.

wordsmythe wrote:

Last arc I saw any of, they were really riding hard on people being guilty and declaring the local pastor trying to help the community to be a "cop killer" because he wasn't turning people in, or something. It went in my "stunningly unreflective" category.

If it's the arc I'm thinking of (it spanned 5 episodes last season), the pastor was a actual cop killer who went free because a dirty cop perjured himself and the murder weapon was never found. Years later, after the reverend turned his life around, the gun mysteriously shows up in his church after it was used to kill several other people. In the end...

Spoiler:

it turns out another detective on the original case has been holding on to the gun all this time. She used it to kill her cheating husband and any witness that could cast suspicion on her.

Thanks, Q. So it's not so bad, so long as you know the season's context.