Crusader Kings II Sparkle Pony-all

I have Steam codes for all of the DLC except the most recent expansion I guess, from the Amazon pack. If any non-grinder is interested in them just send me a PM.

So, I like starting as Poland, lots of little people to pick on early all of which are pagan.

I was doing so well, then I had a second son, and I am going to lose 70% of my stuff when I die. How do I keep this from happening every time?

Kamakazi010654 wrote:

So, I like starting as Poland, lots of little people to pick on early all of which are pagan.

I was doing so well, then I had a second son, and I am going to lose 70% of my stuff when I die. How do I keep this from happening every time?

That's the fun - figuring it out. Or letting it the situation go to hell and then trying to put it all back together.

But...
- if your second son were in the priesthood, they won't inherit anything.
- if your second son were dead, well he won't inherit anything then either.
- if you had primogeniture inheritance, only your oldest living will inherit

There's other ways, but those are the main ones.

tboon wrote:
Kamakazi010654 wrote:

So, I like starting as Poland, lots of little people to pick on early all of which are pagan.

I was doing so well, then I had a second son, and I am going to lose 70% of my stuff when I die. How do I keep this from happening every time?

That's the fun - figuring it out. Or letting it the situation go to hell and then trying to put it all back together.

But...
- if your second son were in the priesthood, they won't inherit anything.
- if your second son were dead, well he won't inherit anything then either.
- if you had primogeniture inheritance, only your oldest living will inherit

There's other ways, but those are the main ones.

The last one is hard to accomplish quickly with Poland. Poland starts out with Gavelkind succession and No Crown Authority - to change to Primogeniture, you need to increase your crown authority to medium. I don't think that a monarch can move it more than one step before they have to leave it to the successor, which means three generations before you can "fix" your inheritance.

However, I agree with tboon - part of the fun is watching what you build fall apart when you die, and trying to get your heir to put it back together. It's a different kind of game than many others in that regard.

So, clicking around for potential rulers to play I'm finding that the majority of characters up in England/Scotland/Ireland have a difficulty of Hard (70%) or worse. Not to be deterred as I still wanted concentrate on the area, I went about choosing a younger leader just so that he would possibly have some longevity to him and have the added bonus of creating my own legacy if he was unmarried with no children. I ended up settling with Gwent, an independent nation in southeast Wales. The small goal I created for myself was to control Wales with as little open conflict as possible.

One thing I discovered about CKII I thought was kind of interest is that there is a tooltip that will pop up to let you know if your selected character has a wikipedia entry. At first I thought this was some sort of built in option in the game, like the Civilopedia. Not true, it actually opens up a web browser and takes you directly to the entry for the character. Seems like I had the same idea as the historical figure.

Just a neat little feature that makes CKII all the more enjoyable. As for my game, I only had enough time to get married before I had to stop playing. I'm pretty interested to see how my first real go at the game turns out, as the first plot that came up after I got married was to actually assasinate my wife. Not sure why that came up so soon--the lady I chose seemed to be pretty decent overall and had a good opinion of me. Oh well, we'll see how that plays out

I know that it is unlikely, but if any of you were interested in Sword of Islam yet missed it when it was on sale on steam for some reason, Amazon now has it at $2.50 as well.

Jasonofindy wrote:

I know that it is unlikely, but if any of you were interested in Sword of Islam yet missed it when it was on sale on steam for some reason, Amazon now has it at $2.50 as well.

There is a possibility I had the DLC in my cart when it was on sale and then completely forgot to actually buy it. You have done me a great service this day. Thanks!

Is there a way for one to declare war over more than a single county, in order to ensure that one gets those things at the end of the war? I started a new game as Scotland, and there's a duke with half a dozen counties that are all part of my de jure kingdom; I'd like to squeeze him out and grab them all at once, but the only declare war reasons are over counties, not duchies.

I thought that perhaps if I declared war and took over everything he might offer me more than I was asking for in a peace settlement, but I don't want to go through all that effort just to find out not. Anyone have experience with this?

Feegle wrote:

Is there a way for one to declare war over more than a single county, in order to ensure that one gets those things at the end of the war? I started a new game as Scotland, and there's a duke with half a dozen counties that are all part of my de jure kingdom; I'd like to squeeze him out and grab them all at once, but the only declare war reasons are over counties, not duchies.

I thought that perhaps if I declared war and took over everything he might offer me more than I was asking for in a peace settlement, but I don't want to go through all that effort just to find out not. Anyone have experience with this?

I have seen casus belli allowing you to claim a duchy or even a kingdom. However, when you use those you usually only claim the titles involved, not actual personal possession of the land involved. Instead, the holders of those lands become your vassals and hold the land for you. As far as grabbing land, your casus belli usually only allows you to declare war for a single county to keep for yourself. I think that the only major exception to this are wars fought against infidels (and possibly heretics).

I have seen in a Let's Play series a case where someone had a number of claims and one of the choices was "press all claims." However, I have only seen that when the claims involved were mostly land claims made by your vassals. Winning transfers the spoils to your "color" and nominal control, but direct control is in the hands of the vassals' whose causes you were fighting for in the first place.

EDIT: It also looks like ALL of the Crusader Kings 2 stuff on Amazon is now at the Steam daily deal price from Thursday. So if anyone passed up the game on Thursday, but reconsidered after reading some of this thread, it looks like you now have another chance to grab what you want.

So I have run into a problem: I have a son and heir to all my counties and he does not belong to my court so I cannot marry him.

When he was 16 I betrothed him to a princess of another kingdom as part of a large inheritance scheme to take over that kingdom. But my stupid son went off and joined some other court and so now he refuses to honor the betrothal now that the princess is of age. When I try to invite him back he refuses and I cannot boost his opinion of me anymore with money because it says that won't help. He has an opinion of me of 45 and I 72 of him. I have no clue how to get him to marry this princess or anyone else. It seems the game won't let him marry someone else while he is betrothed and I cannot even call the betrothal off.

Assassinating him and moving onto a different heir would require I have a second son somehow. I have four daughters and no other sons, and because my last ruler lasted until he was 80 years old by the time he died my eldest daughter and second in line is already married in a normal, non-matrilineal marriage. The odds of him conceiving an heir without a wife are pretty low I would imagine.

Anyone know what to do or is my game about to end?

EDIT: NEVERMIND HE WAS JUST TROLLING ME AND WAITING TO GET MARRIED. Grr

I have never played a Paradox game before and just got done messing with the tutorial a bit. Is it alright if I'm a little frightened? I'm really interested in the game, but wow is there a bit of an overload of info.

obirano wrote:

I have never played a Paradox game before and just got done messing with the tutorial a bit. Is it alright if I'm a little frightened? I'm really interested in the game, but wow is there a bit of an overload of info.

As a relatively new Paradox player, I would be more concerned if you weren't frightened.

The important thing to remember is that you are GOING to mess up your first game or two because of some game mechanic you didn't realize was super important.

Kamakazi010654 wrote:
obirano wrote:

I have never played a Paradox game before and just got done messing with the tutorial a bit. Is it alright if I'm a little frightened? I'm really interested in the game, but wow is there a bit of an overload of info.

As a relatively new Paradox player, I would be more concerned if you weren't frightened.

The important thing to remember is that you are GOING to mess up your first game or two because of some game mechanic you didn't realize was super important.

This is essentially a roguelike principle: you learn by failing. And usually it's fun - e.g. you lose a war to your nephew because you had killed his father and he hates your guts despite the fact that in a fit of benevolence you actually let him out of prison and gave him a landed title.

TL;DR - Benevolence will kill you.

wanderingtaoist wrote:
Kamakazi010654 wrote:
obirano wrote:

I have never played a Paradox game before and just got done messing with the tutorial a bit. Is it alright if I'm a little frightened? I'm really interested in the game, but wow is there a bit of an overload of info.

As a relatively new Paradox player, I would be more concerned if you weren't frightened.

The important thing to remember is that you are GOING to mess up your first game or two because of some game mechanic you didn't realize was super important.

This is essentially a roguelike principle: you learn by failing.

Agreed.

Biggest lesson I learned in my first game: Money spent to upgrade castles that are not part of your demesne is basically wasted.
Biggest lesson I learned in my second game: Build Castle Villages and towns in your demesne as quickly as you can afford them.

A decent income is not as necessary as it might be in a game like Civ, but when you need to hire mercenaries or bribe someone, it's certainly nice to have the funds.

I tried with a ruler that was supposed to be easier, but there is so much territory that I can't seem to keep track of anything. I may try out one of the "harder" ones that have less territory so that I can focus on a small area to get comfortable with the mechanics.

obirano wrote:

I tried with a ruler that was supposed to be easier, but there is so much territory that I can't seem to keep track of anything. I may try out one of the "harder" ones that have less territory so that I can focus on a small area to get comfortable with the mechanics.

I feel that "hard" usually describes only the economic part of the game and not much else. Playing the Duke of Munster is pretty easy and comfortable while the game definitely doesn't think so.

I think that a Duke that controls 2 or 3 counties is probably the sweet spot for starting out.

I know he's popular, but I think it is a disservice for the game to guide new players to choose William and the massive invasion of England at the start. It just seems like way too much to have going on when you're trying to learn the interface and how the game works.

The Spanish kingdoms are also a popular place to start. Starting in Leon or Castille means you get to start as a King, only have to worry about 3-5 counties, you generally start unmarried with few pretenders, are surrounded by only smallish kingdoms, and have plenty of heathan types to expand in to.

I'm only on my second attempt, but loving it so far. It takes a completely different approach to strategy games, and this is my second favorite time period in history, so yay!

Duke of Flanders is, in my opinion, the best place to start in order to learn the mechanics. Why, you might ask? Well

- It's part of France. Nobody is messing with France at the beginning of the game, except for maybe the Muslims in Spain (after the eat the Christian kingdoms). And they are far from you, so not too big a danger.
- Your counties are relatively rich; extra money == good.
- France starts with low crown authority, so you can expand at your neighbors' expense, when you feel like it.
- IIRC, you start off with a decent heir and some nice claims close by.
- You start with 3 counties but your desmense limit is 7 or 8.

When you start to learn this game, I think the most important thing is starting in a relatively stable place while you figure out the mechanics but that also allows you opportunities once you get more confident in those mechanics. And having money is pretty important too. the problem with the Spanish kingdoms is that it is not stable while you learn. They are fun to play but if you are trying to learn the inheritance laws and how to appease your vassals so they don't hate you, trying to fend off the 10K Muslim stack o' doom probably gets in the way of the learning thing.

Anyway, my $.02 worth on where to start. Ireland's good as well but it is not as stable as Flanders. A pissy Scotland or England or Norway can make your day a bad one.

I am right in the middle of my first really successful run. I started as an Italian Count in Northwest Italy and am now the King of Bavaria and Italy. I actually got the Bavarian title almost by accident through two marriages done in two successive generations. The original plan was to inherit the lands above the Alps to help me finance my expansion into Italy, which was slow going due to the lack of good marriage opportunities and slow pace of fabricating claims.

I currently have all of Bavaria except one county, all of northern Italy except 3 counties owned by the HRE (had to act quickly with my bid for independence from the HRE, my original plan was a slower takeover, but there were other rebellions, and a new HR Emperor, with much of its strength already tapped out.), and I am working my way down the Peninsula.

I had an elective monarchy during my HRE days because of an inheritance issue, a daughter in a regular marriage was set to inherit and I was older, but my wife died, I got a young one and had two more sons. So the change was made but I did not need it.

Once I was Independent, I could raise the Crown Authority in Bavaria to high, to get me back to primogeniture succession, but I could not get the Italians to do the same, so Instead, I destroyed the title and reformed it under the same laws as Bavaria, with the added bonus of the end of dinging updates on who Duke X favored that month. It pissed people off, but my guy was 71 and close to dead anyways.

I just love the stories that develop during play. My most recent dead king, who sadly passed this morning was a good example. Just after I got the Kingdom of Bavaria, I put him (he was 8 at the time, as the duke of Bavaria. Still learning, I realized I could not control his education or betrothal once I had done this. Well, he made pretty mediocre decisions and Inherited the throne during his mid 50's with a wife who's stats were junk. Well I got rid of her and married a sixteen year old Danish girl, and it was not long before they both acquired the Lust attribute and promptly pumped out 4 more kids. They were really going at it!

I did the same move with his son who had also married badly, got him remarried and tossed him back out as the duke of Bavaria. The exact opposite thing happened. Both developed Chastity and were about as amorous as two cold stones. It probably did not help he was a dwarf on top of everything else.

Anyways I am still having lots of fun and enjoy reading about everyone's games.

tboon wrote:

Duke of Flanders is, in my opinion, the best place to start in order to learn the mechanics. Why, you might ask? Well

- It's part of France. Nobody is messing with France at the beginning of the game, except for maybe the Muslims in Spain (after the eat the Christian kingdoms). And they are far from you, so not too big a danger.
- Your counties are relatively rich; extra money == good.
- France starts with low crown authority, so you can expand at your neighbors' expense, when you feel like it.
- IIRC, you start off with a decent heir and some nice claims close by.
- You start with 3 counties but your desmense limit is 7 or 8.

When you start to learn this game, I think the most important thing is starting in a relatively stable place while you figure out the mechanics but that also allows you opportunities once you get more confident in those mechanics. And having money is pretty important too. the problem with the Spanish kingdoms is that it is not stable while you learn. They are fun to play but if you are trying to learn the inheritance laws and how to appease your vassals so they don't hate you, trying to fend off the 10K Muslim stack o' doom probably gets in the way of the learning thing.

Anyway, my $.02 worth on where to start. Ireland's good as well but it is not as stable as Flanders. A pissy Scotland or England or Norway can make your day a bad one.

This is good to know. I started a learning game as a Count in Iceland, but not much is going on and I'm finding it difficult to accomplish my objective of becoming Duke of Iceland. Marriage offers aren't being accepted and my military is too small to win both against levies and a siege. I might stick with it for a bit, but will probably try again as Duke of Flanders, which might also excite me more as I'm of Flemish descent.

Though I still find myself confused about how to take over stuff through marriage/assassination. I'm making my way through the youtube, succession is up next so hopefully that helps explain it.

If the game is new to you, and everything looks bewildering, just pretend you're the patriarch of a medieval spin-off of Dallas. Go with your gut, learn from mistakes, and enjoy the soap operas which follow.

Also, I've found that the count of Reggio has a nice starting spot. He starts with two counties, can expand into infidel Sicily, and then usurp the kingdom at some point.

Fans of board game Tales of the Arabian Nights can probably appreciate this game just for the decisions and resulting comitragedies which unfold over a generation or ten.

I think England is a good starting point only if you understand, say, EU3. Otherwise, Ireland or Flanders or Spain as suggested. Although I've not tried the Italians... Hmmm...

I actually tried Reggio. It's not a bad spot to start/learn in. Except the Muslims in Sicily have a tendency to get all grabby.

I picked Savoy to learn the ropes, after reading this tidbit on Wikipedia:

"Installed by Rudolph III, King of Burgundy, officially in 1003, the House of Savoy became the longest surviving royal house in Europe. It ruled the County of Savoy to 1416 and then the Duchy of Savoy from 1416 to 1714."

I wanted to try something near Switzerland (where my real ancestors are from), but that's mostly counties. The Duchy of Savoy is in an interesting spot astride the Alps, and starts with 2 counties and 2 de jure claims that can be picked up fairly quickly.

I have no idea what's going to happen later in the game, though.

Tenebrous wrote:

I did the same move with his son who had also married badly, got him remarried and tossed him back out as the duke of Bavaria. The exact opposite thing happened. Both developed Chastity and were about as amorous as two cold stones. It probably did not help he was a dwarf on top of everything else.

Anyways I am still having lots of fun and enjoy reading about everyone's games.

A dwarf you say? And you let him live? You're a better man than I.

garion333 wrote:
Tenebrous wrote:

I did the same move with his son who had also married badly, got him remarried and tossed him back out as the duke of Bavaria. The exact opposite thing happened. Both developed Chastity and were about as amorous as two cold stones. It probably did not help he was a dwarf on top of everything else.

Anyways I am still having lots of fun and enjoy reading about everyone's games.

A dwarf you say? And you let him live? You're a better man than I.

I swear the game hates me, 75% of my kids end up with stutter, it is c-c-crazy

garion333 wrote:
Tenebrous wrote:

I did the same move with his son who had also married badly, got him remarried and tossed him back out as the duke of Bavaria. The exact opposite thing happened. Both developed Chastity and were about as amorous as two cold stones. It probably did not help he was a dwarf on top of everything else.

Anyways I am still having lots of fun and enjoy reading about everyone's games.

A dwarf you say? And you let him live? You're a better man than I.

It is only the ladies that seem to dislke him. Plus his stats are pretty good, highest being 19 on the sneakiness attribute. His first few years have been good.

Anyhow, I only noticed later once he was installed as the Duke of Bavaria. One of my reasons for installing my heir in a Large Dutchery is to build up some prestiege and money to bring to the game when he is called up. You just have to keep an eye on him to make sure he does not rebel, and it is good.

Tenebrous wrote:

It is only the ladies that seem to dislke him. Plus his stats are pretty good, highest being 19 on the sneakiness attribute. His first few years have been good.

FYI, it's not too hard to find him in your save file and rename him, say, to Jack Large.

So who are the more fun nations to play in Sword of Islam? I picked up the DLC the other day and I'm wondering where to start.