Fitbit (and other!) activity monitor track-all

AnimeJ wrote:

Huh. I wonder how that would fare on an obstacle course.

As long as the obstacles are less than a few inches off the ground it looks like they would just hover over.

So the Up3 will repeatedly run electricity through your skin to check its hydration? Does this bother anyone else?

Kurrelgyre wrote:

So the Up3 will repeatedly run electricity through your skin to check its hydration? Does this bother anyone else?

Hm. Pilot run for an upcoming "negative reinforcement" feature?

Good news: excellent reviews for the Basis Peak are making me feel better about switching back to it as my fitness tracker.
Bad news: yesterday's preorder through Bestbuy.com which was due for delivery today has now been pushed back to 11/26.

Kurrelgyre wrote:

So the Up3 will repeatedly run electricity through your skin to check its hydration? Does this bother anyone else?

I think low-current charges skimming the surface of your skin are peanuts compared to the abundance of various electromagnetic fields we're bathing in daily as well as those other charges we willingly submit ourselves to:

How do touch-screen monitors know where you're touching? wrote:

In the capacitive system, a layer that stores electrical charge is placed on the glass panel of the monitor. When a user touches the monitor with his or her finger, some of the charge is transferred to the user, so the charge on the capacitive layer decreases. This decrease is measured in circuits located at each corner of the monitor.

Gorilla has a good point. Also, I wouldn't be surprised if someone devised a "foil-hat" for the thing. Or, you know, you don't have to keep it on 24/7. Stick it in your pocket or something.

But I am wondering... it says you can swim with it... how does the constant electric current thing work when you're under water?

sometimesdee wrote:

But I am wondering... it says you can swim with it... how does the constant electric current thing work when you're under water?

#YOLO

Heh, you know how many times I died in the original Quake because I accidentally used the lightning gun underwater?

I am seriously looking into one of these for my boyfriend for christmas.

Which one do you think is the most discreet looking? Is there one that you don't have to wear on your wrist and it is more hidden?

peacensunshine wrote:

I am seriously looking into one of these for my boyfriend for christmas.

Which one do you think is the most discreet looking? Is there one that you don't have to wear on your wrist and it is more hidden?

One of the pocket-based solutions would be most discreet. I use the Fitbit One personally.

There's also this thing, which does go on the wrist but looks like an actual watch. The catch? It's $400.

IMAGE(http://www.wareable.com/media/imager/1181-2291f488e09f00416a166d9ba2fdefc9.jpg)

I second the Fitbit One.

Thanks...I'll look a bit more into the fitbit one.

I'd do the watch if I could find one in his style. He is more of an all black, long hair, combat boots kind of guy.

TheGameguru wrote:
sometimesdee wrote:

But I am wondering... it says you can swim with it... how does the constant electric current thing work when you're under water?

#YOLO

Perfect timing.

sometimesdee wrote:

I second the Fitbit One.

Fitbit One is definitely the most discreet out there, particularly for the ladies. My wife clips hers onto her bra.

I read some of the bands type you can wear on your ankle, if they fit.

PC World seems fairly positive about the Basis Peak when compared to the Microsoft Band:

It’s not heartening to see any anomalies, but at least the Peak was notably more accurate than the Microsoft Band, another wearable that claims real-time, continuous heart-rate monitoring. I tested the two wristbands together for both hikes, and the Microsoft Band’s untenable heart-rate swings were much more frequent (for example: 11 times during the second hike) and much more egregious (for example: showing 109 bpm when the Basis and LG wearables were showing 156 and 157 bpm, respectively).

...

Sadly, the Microsoft Band consistently under-reported heart rates during the very same ellipitical machine test. One typical reading: 115 bpm when the Basis and LG devices were reporting 156 bpm in unison.

Hey, folks. The call-out on the podcast sent me searching for this thread. I love the idea of tracking all these metrics, but I'm not sure what I'd actually do with the data. I did a quick browse of the the thread and saw some weight-loss discussion. Anything else you guys are using these things for? If you know you haven't slept well, do you make an effort to get to bed earlier later in the week?

I've done a little bit of comparison shopping, and the GPS integration in some of the newer trackers might be enough to get me to jump in. Right now I use my phone and the free version of the Strava to record runs and bike rides, but I don't do much with the history. I have no idea what I would do with heart rate data to go with time and distance.

And my only fitness goal right now is for all five pairs of my athletic, supportive underwear to be in the dirty clothes hamper when I do laundry on Sunday. When only one or two pairs are dirty, it's been a bad week. On a rare week where I kick-ass with the work-outs, my reward is fishing my favorite red ones out from the bottom of the dirty pile for a Saturday run.

I'm pretty happy with my Peak so far (about 4 days in) with four major caveats:

1) The software doesn't allow me to edit sleep data, and currently seems to think that lounging in bed after waking up is near-identical to deep sleep

2) The software API doesn't communicate with anything else. I'd love for it to dump its data into MyFitnessPal the way Fitbit does.

3) Known issue, apparently, but it doesn't communicate well with phones running Android 4.4.4 - among other things, this means that the displayed time is often one hour ahead or behind the real time.

Case in point: actual time of photograph: 5:21
IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/prdX1r9l.jpg)

4) The phone app is not very good at letting you adjust chart lengths/periods covered yet. It has a pinch/swipe interface that doesn't seem to actually correspond to any effect that's produced on screen.

That said, it's quite a bit more handsome than any fitness tracker I've seen, short of the Withings, the data is profoundly deep - tons of points of information coming in on the exercise, that should make calorie calculations etc. more accurate than step counts or the MS Band's lower frequency heartrate monitor. The watch band and tracker itself are comfortable and unobtrusive.

I think the positive news is that all of the issues are software based, correctable, and most are known. The negative is that many of them predate the Peak and go back to the Basis B1, without any public-facing signs of progress.

That said, I think it's the best hardware on the market at the $100-200 price point, and probably will remain so for the foreseeable future. I knew I was taking an early adopter hit on the software, but don't feel the urge to return it/find a different solution.

ThingumBob wrote:

I love the idea of tracking all these metrics, but I'm not sure what I'd actually do with the data. I did a quick browse of the the thread and saw some weight-loss discussion. Anything else you guys are using these things for? If you know you haven't slept well, do you make an effort to get to bed earlier later in the week?

I've used sleep tracking on the One from time to time. I think it's most useful for testing out changes; if you want to change a specific thing, you can see the impact with the sleep tracker. In my case, I started taking melatonin, and saw a correlation with better sleep on the Fitbit graph. That was really quite cool.

Once I noted that, though, I just didn't keep up with it. The Fitbit tracking isn't very precise, or at least it doesn't seem to be. I was getting better scores on melatonin but I have no idea how my sleep compares to anybody else's. I still don't ever feel like I've gotten enough sleep, even though my data tells me I slept very well. So it seems to be of questionable value in my case.

Getting into (or staying in) shape is obviously the big lure for a lot of people and it's what I focus on with these devices.

The recent devices with GPS obviously enable a lot more useful data; you can compare times, upload to services like Strava or MapMyRun, etc. Getting a heart rate reading is great for telling you how far you can push yourself safely. Having that kind of detail is really useful.

gore wrote:

Once I noted that, though, I just didn't keep up with it. The Fitbit tracking isn't very precise, or at least it doesn't seem to be. I was getting better scores on melatonin but I have no idea how my sleep compares to anybody else's.

This is the reason that I swapped from Fitbit to the Up24. There ecosystem gives you aggregate stats for users similar to you in terms of fitness and age so that you can see whether or not you get more / less exercise, sleep, etc and it's also more useful now that they've added their Smart Coach to the Jawbone app.

Merkaba wrote:
gore wrote:

Once I noted that, though, I just didn't keep up with it. The Fitbit tracking isn't very precise, or at least it doesn't seem to be. I was getting better scores on melatonin but I have no idea how my sleep compares to anybody else's.

This is the reason that I swapped from Fitbit to the Up24. There ecosystem gives you aggregate stats for users similar to you in terms of fitness and age so that you can see whether or not you get more / less exercise, sleep, etc and it's also more useful now that they've added their Smart Coach to the Jawbone app.

That's good to know. I put the Google Fit app on my phone just to try the interface and it's very sparse (unless I'm missing something?). I'll have to check out the Jawbone software.

Are the subscription site features necessary to get the most out of these tools?

Are there any pebble owners here who use the fitness tracking functions, specifically sleep tracking?

If so, how does it work, and does it do haptic alarms in the morning?

Got the Surge today at Target. I'm digging it so far. Nice to have the time on my wrist again (among other features). It'll be 3-4 weeks before I can try running with it due to foot recovery. Really happy to ditch the gps watch plus hr chest strap that I was using with Nike+.

Without the Fitbit, I'd have no idea that I took 529 steps at 2 AM last night looking around the house for my mildly-inebriated wife's Kindle (which we didn't wind up finding until this morning).

My Fitbit Force's band broke today. Separated cleanly from the body of the "brain" section, after the rubber wiggled loose from under the piece of screwed-down plastic that held it in place. It feels really strange NOT having something on my wrist now after about 11 months wearing one -- and this coming from someone who hadn't worn a watch for the nearly 10 years prior. I was planning to upgrade to a Surge when it comes out in a few months (Q1 2015, I believe I read)... but WTF?! it's available in stores now? And *still* listed as "coming soon" on fitbit.com?

merphle wrote:

:( It feels really strange NOT having something on my wrist now after about 11 months wearing one -- and this coming from someone who hadn't worn a watch for the nearly 10 years prior. I was planning to upgrade to a Surge when it comes out in a few months (Q1 2015, I believe I read)... but WTF?! it's available in stores now? And *still* listed as "coming soon" on fitbit.com?

It's very comfortable, but the Charge HR may suit more people (it's supposed to have a different band texture than the Charge, plus the heart monitor). Currently the Surge is limited to notifying Texts and calls, nothing else, and the watch display doesn't show the date.

So I'm thinking about getting an activity tracker because I have high blood pressure and need to get in shape. Which one should I buy the fitbit or a jawbone

Are you OK with a bracelet style, or would you rather not wear something on your wrist all the time?

I got a Fitbit One because it could clip onto whatever I'm wearing, but if you're likely to forget and put it through the wash a bracelet would be better.