Help me build my PC 2014 Edition Catch All

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The Purpose of this thread is to catch all questions about potential PC builds and/or issues you have with existing PC’s that need upgrades. I will keep as current as I can two separate “suggested” PC builds that hit two major price points (under $1000 and under $2000). Within those builds should be fairly easy and obvious ways to reduce the price $X hundred dollars down and or up which I will suggest underneath each link to the build.

"Console Killer Build" 3/24/2015

This is an approx. $500 PC that will perform at 720P/1080P comparably to current gen console platforms. This is certainly not a exhaustive attempt to optimize to the last % of performance but a general guide to a PC that will play modern titles at Medium details at 720P/1080P at ~30fps.

https://pchound.com/9Uv9MP/

Sub $1000 Build. 10/5/2014

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/thegame...

This is a quality Gaming PC at a sub $1000 Price point. Target gaming resolution is 1080P/1440P @60fps with High to Ultra details in all modern Games (variance is dependent on specific games). Specifics are 4GB of VRAM in the GPU to allow for new Cross Platform titles to select the highest quality textures. You won’t find an SSD in this build as the price point would be difficult to maintain. Minus the SSD this is a very strong gaming PC.

Options I can suggest are

1. Swap out 2TB HD for larger HD (example going to a 4TB would add roughly $100 to the price)
2. Downgrade GPU to an Nvidia GTX 960 or AMD 380. Both Cards will eventually offer 4GB VRAM options (right now only 2GB GTX960's are out but 4GB are coming so wait for them). As well overall detail levels will be lower than what you can expect @ 1080P vs the GTX 970. Savings will be roughly $70 (this assumes a price of $249 for 4GB GTX960's) which will allow you a larger HD (3TB) to keep roughly the same price point or a 256GB SSD ($100) while staying below $1000.
3. Add a “smallish” SSD to the build in addition to the HD. Crucial’s new MX200 128GB can be found for $67 keeps you under $1000. Faster OS boot times as well as allowing a handful (maybe one lol) of Games to be loaded. This assumes the Video Card downgrade.

Sub $2000 Build 9/28/2014

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/thegame...

This is a “high end” Gaming PC that focuses on gaming at > 1080P resolutions. 1440P/1600P @ 50-70+FPS at High to Ultra details is the target for this build. Again you will find 4GB of VRAM to allow for the highest texture levels in newer Cross Platform Titles. Additionally a large SSD and HD will be featured for no compromise disk performance.

Options I can suggest are

1. Take out the AMD 295x for a single GTX980 to save roughly $100. You will lose roughly 40%-60% performance though.
2. Drop SSD down to 256GB and CPU to i5-4670K. This saves you roughly $210 and gets you closer to the $1500 Price Point.

Steam Box Build 9/29/2014

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/thegame...

Click here for this discussion

http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/4...

In summary this is a specific build list I created for a purpose built PC that runs Steam in Big Picture mode 24x7.

Options I can suggest are

1. Drop GPU down to a GTX 960 4GB or a AMD 380 to save $70 (assuming a price of $249 when the GTX 960 4GB models are released). This option will still allow for 1080P gaming but with lower details and lower average FPS.

General PC Build buying Tips

1. Make sure you buy a quality PSU. Avoid an ultra-cheap PSU at all costs. This might be the single most important piece you buy in your build as a cheap PSU can fry ALL your components. So why spend $1500 on a shiny new gaming PC to only then save $70 on a cheap PSU that could jeopardize all your other components.
2. Microcenter is your friend. They have killer CPU deals that can sometime save you $60+ over an online purchase. You can price match as well for all the components to save even more (check for actual details)
3. Buy a real Microsoft wireless Xbox Controller. Perhaps soon Microsoft will update this to support the Xbox One with a new version.

Building a PC from Scratch.

Here are some tips for the actual build process when all your parts have finally arrived.

1. Unbox and inspect everything for any visible damage that might have occurred during shipment before you start trying to assemble your PC.
2. Many cases come with barebones type fans. Think about your specific gaming area and consider purchasing “extra” or replacement fans from companies like Scythe or Noctua. I like Corsair fans simply for their color coordination with other Corsair components
3. I don’t include Optical Drives in my lists, so make sure you have access to a working PC to download latest motherboard drivers and copy them to a USB Thumb Drive. Another option is to simply add a $20 optical to any of the builds
4. Start the build by removing any fans you will replace and/or removing the fan if it occupies the slot you want the closed loop radiator fan to go.
5. Corsair includes all the case hardware in a small box in a drive caddy.
6. Start by mounting the motherboard into the case. Corsair includes standoffs for MATX and ATX, you will have to add standoffs for certain EATX and MiniITX motherboards (look in that small box)
7. Make sure you install the Motherboard Port shield in the case BEFORE trying to mount the motherboard. As well if your motherboard comes with some sort of wifi addon card that sometimes needs to be installed prior to mounting the motherboard.
8. Next install the CPU
9. Next install your PSU and route the motherboard power cables to their correct location. There will be a 25 pin and a 4/8 pin cable for the motherboard. Some EATX motherboards will have a 3rd Power cable for builds that have 3+ GPU’s. Don’t bother to run your other PSU cables yet, but make sure the 4/8 is run as that will frequently be in a spot that will be tricky to reach once the CPU cooling is mounted.
10. Don’t tie down cables just yet.
11. Mount your CPU cooling. Intel CPU’s and Corsair Fixed Loop cooling requires a backplane but the Corsair cases will have a cutout to easily access this. I like orienting the fans to pull cool air in over the Radiator. For 120mm radiators mount them above the motherboard ports. For 240mm radiators mount it on the top side of the case
a. Mount radiator first making sure the CPU cooler is covered and safe.
b. Mount CPU cooler and screw down tightly. Connect the power connectors for the Pump and Fans
12. Install Memory, and Case Fans and connect them to power on your motherboard (or wait for PSU) Make note of how you’re your radiators hot air will vent out (usually out the top of the case with a fan set to exhaust)
13. Connect your SATA cables and run them to the general locations that are required
14. Connect your Case Cables to the motherboard (Reset, Power, USB, Front Audio etc.)
15. Install your Boot Hard Drive and connect to SATA cable
16. Run all your other PSU cables including the PCIe Power Cable(s) for your GPU(s)
17. Install your GPU(s)
18. Connect PCIe Power cables to your GPU(s), and your Hard Drive(s)
19. Power up the PC to test to ensure functionality
20. If the PC won’t boot make sure everything is seated correctly
21. If motherboard lights up and fans spin briefly up and then down WAIT a second. UEFI based PC’s will frequently power up then spin down and power up a second time for good.
22. If motherboard lights up but PC won’t stay on, check memory for compatibility in your motherboards manual, as well make sure the GPU is seated correctly. If your CPU has onboard GPU remove the GPU and see if the PC boots up (if it does then your GPU might be bad)
23. Move GPU to a different PCIe slot
24. Hopefully your PC boots up and you can move to installing the OS
25. Once OS is installed and your PC has based a good 24 hour burn in period you can power down and tie down all your cables and neaten everything up.
26. Enjoy.

I'd just like to note that some of the build steps may need to occur in a different order based on case design and the cooler being used. For example, I've had to mount the CPU, cooler, and even the memory in the motherboard before mounting it in the case, and it can be easier to install the PSU after all of that is in place. Give everything a good look and figure out what order will be easiest when putting things together.

Make sure you install standoffs in the case for all applicable locations on the motherboard (the tinned holes in the motherboard are for standoffs) and nowhere else. Putting a standoff in the wrong place can short your board, and failing to install a few can make it difficult to secure your GPU and in extreme cases might cause the motherboard to flex and break when installing components. I like to figure out where to put the standoffs as the first step. Put the bare motherboard in the case and note the standoff locations, remove it and install standoffs, put the motherboard back in and make sure you did it right, repeat as necessary. Then remove the motherboard and begin assembly.

It sounds like so long as you build with a Corsair case none of this may be necessary, but other brands aren't always so accommodating.

Tagging because after dropping cash to buy my wife a new truck, she's more amenable to me getting a new PC and cannibalizing the old one to build her her own machine.

<3

Useful and current information in the OP. Thanks Guru.

Favorited, this is great

complexmath wrote:
I'd just like to note that some of the build steps may need to occur in a different order based on case design and the cooler being used. For example, I've had to mount the CPU, cooler, and even the memory in the motherboard before mounting it in the case, and it can be easier to install the PSU after all of that is in place. Give everything a good look and figure out what order will be easiest when putting things together.

Was just thinking about posting exactly this. GameGuru's guide is a wonderful vanilla overview. It always helps to get all of the components out and plan the build order and cable routes before installing anything though.

One additional general rule: The smaller the case, the more important it is to plan ahead. That's especially true when you get to ITX territory where components can block off access to the memory slots or headers.

Thanks GG I just bought a modified version of your sub-1000 build. I ended up going mATX on the mobo and case though as the hutch we keep the PC in wouldn't take a full ATX case.

I just used Newegg as I have a preferred account there and I saved money on the OS with my TechNet subscription. I'll post more when it arrives.

So like I said on the other thread, new job pays a lot better than expected, and I'm building a new computer to celebrate graduation and generally being in a good place in my life. I've put together an initial build based on a lot of research through Tom's Hardware and a few other sources, linked below:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/KsJcRB

Couple of notes:
It's pretty expensive. I generally use the next best stuff, as it's at just the right point in the price/longevity curve. Not new enough to come with an inflated price tag, but still new enough where it performs up to standard for a fairly long time. But just once I wanted to go with a top of the line build.

I'm a little bit conflicted on the power supply. Not because of SeaSonic, who are excellent, but because I'm not sure if I want to end up Crossfiring a pair of R9s somewhere down the line. I'm actually more bothered by the power drain of a double board than I am the additional cost of the bigger supply. It comes close to doubling my power usage. I feel like I need to set up a solar panel system to run this thing if I'm going to be drawing close to a kilowatt with any regularity. Also considered dropping to an 80+ Gold SeaSonic, but the one in the range I'm looking at looks like it's actually a 1000 kW Bronze. And it sounds like the Platinum models have a lot of additional OCP and part quality.

I ended up going with the Phantom case mainly on the strength of its looks. It seems like a really well-regarded case. I've got an additional case fan, since apparently it really helps to stick an additional fan on the front intake.

I'm probably going to end up doing this in stages, buying the bare bones stuff first and using my pre-existing and perfectly adequate graphics card, then adding some of the things like the additional storage down the line.

I would be fine using 1866 DDR3 RAM, but for some reason there's no difference in price between the 1866 and the 2133 right now.

I came into this thinking that I wanted to do a fair bit of overclocking, but it doesn't sound like there's much to be gained beyond using the new Haswell chip's self-optimization routine. (I may not be reading that correctly. It's half remembered from an article about overclocking the Devil's Canyon chips.) Still, I wouldn't mind 4.5 Ghz.

Anyone have any experience with Newegg Premier? Other than some nice stuff about shipping prices, I can't quite figure out if it's worth it from the outset. I'll probably do their one-month trial when I'm closer to buying everything, but I was just wondering if there were any hidden benefits.

but because I'm not sure if I want to end up Crossfiring a pair of R9s somewhere down the line.

Well, the TDP on the 290X is 300 watts, so an 860-watt supply should comfortably cover two of those plus any CPU overclock you'd ever actually see. However, you will not be able to OC the 290Xs, probably, because their power requirements go insane if you try to do that. As long as you're at stock GPU clocks (CPU overclock is okay) that should be fine for two. But I wouldn't want to go any smaller, if dual cards are in the offing.

Well, I would be fine using 1866 DDR3 RAM, but for some reason there's no difference in price between the 1866 and the 2133 right now.

That's because it's basically the same RAM. They crank up the headline numbers, but the actual latency is the same as it ever was. RAM has barely changed in fifteen years; it gets smaller, and they keep stacking it up wider, and increasing the signaling rate, but the latency has barely moved in all that time. No games really benefit from the pseudo-faster RAM; some parallel, data-intensive algorithms like video encoding can be improved somewhat, but it's not that dramatic. Latency is the big choke point, and the actual physical delay doesn't change at all as you crank up that headline number; you might be at CAS 10 at 1866, and then going to 2133 brings you up to CAS12 or 13. It takes, in other words, almost exactly the same amount of wall clock time for the RAM to respond at either DDR speed.

Those big DDR numbers are mostly sizzle. If you want the actual steak, Crucial's Ballistix Tactical 1.35 volt DDR3-1600 is some of the best RAM on the market. You should be able to overclock it to those higher speeds (and correspondingly higher latencies) if you really want to, instead of buying it pre-overvolted and overclocked, which is what you get with all those big-DDR-number parts. But you also know that it will run cool, fast, and stable without needing a ton of voltage, which is how you know good RAM. Many manufacturing sins can be covered up by increasing voltage.

I ended up going with the Phantom case mainly on the strength of its looks.

I don't know anything about that case, but you might want to verify that it can take the H100, which is quite large. It more or less needs a mount that's specifically intended to take it. I believe all the Corsair cases handle it, and they're pretty good, worth considering if the Phantom won't work.

Also note that there's nothing really special about the H100; you can do just as well for cooling with an excellent heatpipe setup, and it would probably cost less. The big reason for those water coolers is for space issues, when you can't fit one of the big heatpipe towers in your case. The choke point on any cooler is the radiator, and hauling the heat around with water does nothing for overall efficiency. The water cooler radiators are perfectly decent, but the heatpipe coolers are just as good, are more reliable, and usually cost less.

Still, I wouldn't mind 4.5 Ghz.

It's really sounding like these 4790Ks don't go much past the headline numbers of 4.4GHz... most places have been saying 4.7 with careful tuning. It seems like the 4770K has about the same maximum. But the default settings are higher in the 4790K, so that's probably the way I'd go. I probably wouldn't, however, bother with the OC, because it's just too small to really notice. (4.4 to 4.7, oh yay, such a big deal.) I haven't looked, but if there's a non-K version of the 4790, I might grab that instead, to get the extra virtualization features that Intel sandbags on their K parts.

Anyone have any experience with Newegg Premier?

None here. I've been buying most of my computer parts from Amazon for a few years now.

Those big DDR numbers are mostly sizzle. If you want the actual steak, Crucial's Ballistix Tactical 1.35 volt DDR3-1600 is some of the best RAM on the market. You should be able to overclock it to those higher speeds (and correspondingly higher latencies) if you really want to, instead of buying it pre-overvolted and overclocked, which is what you get with all those big-DDR-number parts. But you also know that it will run cool, fast, and stable without needing a ton of voltage, which is how you know good RAM. Many manufacturing sins can be covered up by increasing voltage.

It sounds like really good hardware (Tom's Hardware is really high on it), but again, it's only $5 cheaper than the G-skill Ripclaw Zs. And for $5 difference, I'm not sure I want to get too much into memory timing. I have some idea what's going on when you raise the clock speeds and the voltages on a CPU. I'm still a little fuzzy on what's happening with the timing stuff, even after doing a fair bit of reading on it.

I was looking for an authoritative source on memory speeds (i.e., some motherf*cking graphs), and came across this, which I think sums up what you're saying pretty nicely:

Also this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/...

So basically, everything in the world of gaming runs about the same with different memory speeds except for some reason, F1 2012.

Also note that there's nothing really special about the H100; you can do just as well for cooling with an excellent heatpipe setup, and it would probably cost less. The big reason for those water coolers is for space issues, when you can't fit one of the big heatpipe towers in your case. The choke point on any cooler is the radiator, and hauling the heat around with water does nothing for overall efficiency. The water cooler radiators are perfectly decent, but the heatpipe coolers are just as good, are more reliable, and usually cost less.

I'm waffling a little bit on this one. The main reason for choosing the H100 is the heat issues that I talked about in the other thread. The only thing that really solved them last time was getting the radiator mounted towards the outside. Even with all the extra ventilation, I'm not sure I trust the ambient temperature inside the case. But I am looking at some of the Zalman designs, and they seem a lot more intuitive than the aftermarket air cooler that I was using before. One of the other things limiting me was that I was having a hard time finding LGA 1150 socket coolers, but apparently the 1150s fit into the 1156 sockets, and a lot of the cooler manufacturers just haven't updated their documentation/marketing. No, you're right. I'm getting a new case for a reason. Trust in the airflow. Think I'll switch it out for a Noctua NH-D14. Much as I like the look of those Zalmans, the Noctua's pretty clearly superior.

It's really sounding like these 4790Ks don't go much past the headline numbers of 4.4GHz... most places have been saying 4.7 with careful tuning. It seems like the 4770K has about the same maximum. But the default settings are higher in the 4790K, so that's probably the way I'd go. I probably wouldn't, however, bother with the OC, because it's just too small to really notice. (4.4 to 4.7, oh yay, such a big deal.) I haven't looked, but if there's a non-K version of the 4790, I might grab that instead, to get the extra virtualization features that Intel sandbags on their K parts.

Supposedly the K versions have a lot better quality thermal compound and layout under the die package. If nothing else, that bodes well for overall durability.

Tom's Hardware is really high on it

Tom's Hardware is a crap outfit, and can mostly be ignored.

Seriously, they're outright incompetent as often as not.

Anandtech is okay, and HardOCP is usually quite good. But ignore Tom's. Their major skill is bullsh*t.

I mean, as an example, a few years back, they did this review of a really super-high end motherboard that was designed for three-way SLI when that was a new idea. The motherboard was engineered to provide a ton of bandwidth to three PCIe slots at once. It was very expensive.

So how did Tom's review it? They slapped a so-so CPU in it, a single midrange video card, benched it against motherboards that cost a third as much, and declared it a loser.

They suck.

Oh, and:

Supposedly the K versions have a lot better quality thermal compound and layout under the die package.

Yeah, that's what I was hearing too, but we're seeing lousy OC results, so I'm not sure how true that is, or that the poor TIM in the earlier chips was actually the problem, post-Sandy Bridge.

New Samsung 470 series SSD's appear to be the "bees knees"

http://www.thessdreview.com/our-revi...

Pricey though!

TheGameguru wrote:
New Samsung 470 series SSD's appear to be the "bees knees"

http://www.thessdreview.com/our-revi...

Pricey though!

I'm hoping all these new drives will mean a price drop on some of the already great drives. I still want a 1TB 840 Evo. It's been down below $400 on Amazon once. I'm at a point now where I want one bad enough that I think if it pokes down near $300 I'll be too impatient to wait any longer and will just buy one.

Someone should pm Certis to sticky this...

Spoiler:
I'm lazy

Well, uh, since there seems to be a new version of this I'm .. going to drop this in here too?
Please excuse me if this type of post no longer belongs here, and if you'd like I suppose you can delete it too.

from old thread
Out of curiosity would anyone have some DDR2 ram sticks sitting around in a box? Because its a no longer in production scenario its rather expensive to buy it new, outright. I'm looking for 4gig sticks, and it would have to work with my old mobo. I'm trying to prolong needing to upgrade my machine (you know, I've been here twice looking for upgrading help/tips) and I've recently come to realize that my mobo can do more than I thought it could.

I have a nice post with specs (if you want them) over at eggxpert newegg forms and I'll drop a link here for that for your pleasure.
https://community.newegg.com/eggxpert/computer_hardware/f/135071/t/140975.aspx

Thanks!

(I'll be cross posting part of this in the trade thread to see if anyone checks that one too.)

This is an awesome post. As someone who loves to build PC's for myself and others but don't have to time to always keep up, I thank you.

I'll be making my own later this year. I just made a deal with my wife, and any money I save, legitimately, in the weekly grocery allocation goes straight to my PC fund.

Time to start eating cat food kids!

I was going to look at a compactITX(?) to run as a SteamBox, but I just read through your link from the OP TG, and I may need to rethink that. I too am picking this as a 'better option' than a PS4 or XB1, mainly due to the ridiculously good deals I can get on Steam, and the already available Steam Library I have. A PS4, and three retail games will set me back AU$1000 any way, so why not invest in a better box, and 'spend $100 every 6 months' in the sales?

I'm not sure all parts will be as readily available in Australia, so I may need to check back from time to time for equivalents, etc. The build may not happen straight away either, but I'm aiming for Christmas as a deadline.

I'd also like to echo the thanks in the thread, this is just the info I was looking for.

My problem with MiniITX builds is that as the case grows they end up not that much smaller than MATX cases like the Corsair 350D (compared to the MiniITX 250D). And the really nice compact MiniITX cases are a PITA to work with and generally frustrate the crap out of me. So unless you have a burning need and/or desire for a small as possible case then avoid them in favor of a small MATX case. I found some MiniITX cases to run far louder than a nice MATX case as well as their restricted airflow required fans to run harder and louder to keep the system cool.

The upcoming Air 240 from Corsair is certainly interesting..

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/blog/20...

This will be my first build, ever, so I'm guessing the less frustrating the better.

Here is a really 'noob' question. I know you 'get what you pay for', but what exactly am I getting/missing out on when it comes to the wide variety in case prices? I've seen units as low as $49, and some in the $300+ range? Is it just aesthetics, and ease of access, or are units optimized for components from the same manufacturer, ie, brand X's case is better with brand X's PSU and fans/cooling options?

It looks like I'm going to be restricted to the suppliers I get access too, as a lot of the good bargains are on the East Coast of Australia, but we get slugged with crazy shipping charges to the West. Save $5, but get slugged $43 shipping, WTF?

This one has a decent range of cases, and I get free shipping to my door if my order is over $150, so that's a win too, once I add in some other components.

m0nk3yboy wrote:
This will be my first build, ever, so I'm guessing the less frustrating the better.

Here is a really 'noob' question. I know you 'get what you pay for', but what exactly am I getting/missing out on when it comes to the wide variety in case prices? I've seen units as low as $49, and some in the $300+ range? Is it just aesthetics, and ease of access, or are units optimized for components from the same manufacturer, ie, brand X's case is better with brand X's PSU and fans/cooling options?

It looks like I'm going to be restricted to the suppliers I get access too, as a lot of the good bargains are on the East Coast of Australia, but we get slugged with crazy shipping charges to the West. Save $5, but get slugged $43 shipping, WTF?

This one has a decent range of cases, and I get free shipping to my door if my order is over $150, so that's a win too, once I add in some other components.

The nicer cases generally have less sharp edges, better setups for fans/water cooling, and better layouts for running cables in a more controlled fashion. They're also often of thicker metal, and in many cases can be quieter.

Tons of places do case reviews, so if you find one you're interested in, google it.

If I have a hard drive with OS(es) set up like I want, what are the impediments to dropping it into a system with different motherboard and CPU? I assume Windows would try downloading the correct drivers for the chipset, but other than that, seems like it would be easy. That's why I'm suspicious. A quick DDG suggests as recently as 2012 is wasn't much of a prospect, and while I'll keep searching, I wondered if folks here have pointers.

TheGameguru wrote:
The upcoming Air 240 from Corsair is certainly interesting..

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/blog/20...


That does look sweet!

If I have a hard drive with OS(es) set up like I want, what are the impediments to dropping it into a system with different motherboard and CPU?

On Win7, the biggest issue is whether or not your system has sufficient boot-time drivers to get the drives operational on the new chipset.

If the drive controllers are in AHCI mode on the old board, then everything should transfer fine, although it will take multiple reboots for Windows to get everything straightened out, and you may need to install manual drivers. Network drivers are particularly likely; make extra sure to have net drivers on USB stick.

If the drives aren't in AHCI mode, then you could have problems. That can be worked around, but it will take some effort.

On XP, it's much harder. It's usually better to just do a new install, there.

Krillerill wrote:
TheGameguru wrote:
The upcoming Air 240 from Corsair is certainly interesting..

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/blog/20...


That does look sweet!

My local link has the 540 at AU$199, so I'm guessing/hoping that when they release that one down here the US$89-99 translates to under AU$150.

I don't really care much for the side glass panel though, I hope there is an option for a fully enclosed siding. Do glass panels add to the noise factor (insulating the sound), and do you need to be mindful of internal glow spill from the front indicator lights.

I'd prefer my distracting illumination to be kept to a minimum.

So RAM is going cheap again?

Patriot 8GB for $40 after MIR: (1333, 9 9 9 24 so on the slow side)

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...

Any thoughts on the Cooler Master Elite 110? I'm considering a SFF build, possibly a SteamBox. I don't intend to have an optical drive, so I want a completely blank front face. NUC isn't really an option yet, but I'm starting to consider it.

How much would this cost of I were to build it?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...

I prefer laptops, but if the price is significantly cheaper I would consider that.

EverythingsTentative wrote:
How much would this cost of I were to build it?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...

I prefer laptops, but if the price is significantly cheaper I would consider that.

I'm heading out for work but just looking at it off the top of my head I wouldn't say anymore than $1500. I'll look up the parts and post back later.

Edit: Are you wanting the same brand name on the components are just equivalents?

Gumbie wrote:
EverythingsTentative wrote:
How much would this cost of I were to build it?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...

I prefer laptops, but if the price is significantly cheaper I would consider that.

I'm heading out for work but just looking at it off the top of my head I wouldn't say anymore than $1500. I'll look up the parts and post back later.

Edit: Are you wanting the same brand name on the components are just equivalents?

Equivalent, I guess. I've never built a PC, so I'm not good with what works well together, latency, etc..

Are you trying to build a Laptop? I'm confused.

TheGameguru wrote:
Are you trying to build a Laptop? I'm confused.

Well I'm trying to get a new gaming laptop. I've always preferred laptops, because I can move it around my house, easily, but if I can build a desktop for a lot cheaper I may go that way.

Wait, you can build a laptop at home?

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