Climate Change Is Already Here, Says Massive Government Report

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Yup!

fangblackbone wrote:

Well I guess I'd better get out my big diesel and do nothing but mud donuts for the rest of my life ;P
Honestly, I don't think there is a tipping point or at least that isn't an important marker for me.
If the world is going to sh*t, dissolving into anarchy, it doesn't mean we stop being humane.

One thing that really depresses me about all of this is that I chose not to have kids, in large part, because I didn't want to bring kids into this world. It was about 50℅ that, 30℅ I don't want to change diapers and 20℅ I like my freedom.

I thought that I had spared someone having to survive the world we were neglecting, but I assumed most of the worst wouldn't impact me. I don't know what that means. I guess that things look to be trending much worse than I cynically thought they might.

I don't care about myself, but I do care about my boyfriend and it breaks my heart thinking of him suffering. So all of this has me concerned. Hopefully it is further off in the future, like the 2050s. Not like that is a big help, but I don't want to see the people I care about suffering any time soon.

I honestly wish it became illegal to publish anti climate science nonsense or to deny it. It is so absurd and damaging.

Recent You Are Not So Smart episode on what does and doesn't help convince people about climate change. Doesn't seem to be up on the YANSS page yet.

LeapingGnome wrote:

We'll see what happens when a lot of people start starving in countries the western world cares about because the land is turning to desert and there are water shortages.

Thank goodness for GMO crops.

Nomad wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

We'll see what happens when a lot of people start starving in countries the western world cares about because the land is turning to desert and there are water shortages.

Thank goodness for GMO crops.

:)

Well... yes.

GMO Crops and other bits of Techno-Wizardry are the only reason we might possibly be able to continue feeding 7 billion+ humans. Or for a far too large percentage start providing adequate food in the first place.

Nomad wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

We'll see what happens when a lot of people start starving in countries the western world cares about because the land is turning to desert and there are water shortages.

Thank goodness for GMO crops.

:)

If only people were not so addicted to eating meat. A lot of livelihoods are tied into the meat industry, a miniature version of this can be seen in Australia and the rising temperatures and droughts they've had since 2010 affecting the farmers/ranchers there that expanded into areas during the good times and now during bad times there is no enough water and it is turning to desert.

Nomad wrote:
LeapingGnome wrote:

We'll see what happens when a lot of people start starving in countries the western world cares about because the land is turning to desert and there are water shortages.

Thank goodness for GMO crops.

:)

A Small Bang for Big Bucks
Though the mid-2000's saw a surge in field trials for crop varieties with engineered drought tolerance traits, as of 2012 only one such variety—Monsanto's DroughtGard, containing the engineered gene cspB—had been approved by the USDA.

The results so far paint a less than spectacular picture of DroughtGard's effectiveness: USDA analysis of data supplied by Monsanto show that DroughtGard produces only modest results, and only under moderate drought conditions at that. The report estimates that cspB corn would increase the overall productivity of the U.S. corn crop by only about one percent. And DroughtGard does not improve water use efficiency.

The evidence suggests that alternatives to GE—classical breeding, improved farming practices, or crops naturally more drought-tolerant than corn, such as sorghum and millet—can produce better results, often at lower cost. If we neglect these alternatives because of exaggerated expectations about the benefits of GE, we risk leaving farmers and the public high and dry when it comes to ensuring that we will have enough food and clean freshwater to meet everyone's needs.

Scientists declare dawn of the human-influenced Age

Humanity’s impact on the Earth is now so profound that a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene – needs to be declared, according to an official expert group who presented the recommendation to the International Geological Congress in Cape Town on Monday.

The new epoch should begin about 1950, the experts said, and was likely to be defined by the radioactive elements dispersed across the planet by nuclear bomb tests, although an array of other signals, including plastic pollution, soot from power stations, concrete, and even the bones left by the global proliferation of the domestic chicken were now under consideration.

Evidence of the Anthropocene

Human activity has:

Pushed extinction rates of animals and plants far above the long-term average. The Earth is on course to see 75% of species become extinct in the next few centuries if current trends continue.

Increased levels of climate-warming CO2 in the atmosphere at the fastest rate for 66m years, with fossil-fuel burning pushing levels from 280 parts per million before the industrial revolution to 400ppm and rising today.

Put so much plastic in our waterways and oceans that microplastic particles are now virtually ubiquitous, and plastics will likely leave identifiable fossil records for future generations to discover.

Doubled the nitrogen and phosphorous in our soils in the past century with fertiliser use. This is likely to be the largest impact on the nitrogen cycle in 2.5bn years.

Left a permanent layer of airborne particulates in sediment and glacial ice such as black carbon from fossil fuel burning.

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