Monitor recommendations. What's good?

Clusks wrote:

The problem is that I've had to shove the monitor right in the corner because the stand of it makes it really stick out.

(...)

Does anyone know of a monitor like this, with a stand that doesn't take up loads of room?

Monitor arms, dude. Stands are crap. Take back your desk space.

WizKid wrote:

I would not try 4k on a 1070 GPU.

This. I have a 1070 running a 1440p monitor, and it does a great job of that, but I'm not getting the >100 fps I'd need to be confident it'd still run solid at 4k.

1070 was the sweet spot for 1440p. Or at least it was until the new crop of cards came out, and now it's the 2060.

You'd want to go 1080Ti or 2060 at minimum for 4K, or more ideally, 2070.

Rock Paper Shotgun are my bible for GPU decisions.

*Legion* wrote:
Clusks wrote:

The problem is that I've had to shove the monitor right in the corner because the stand of it makes it really stick out.

(...)

Does anyone know of a monitor like this, with a stand that doesn't take up loads of room?

Monitor arms, dude. Stands are crap. Take back your desk space.

I think this is the path I will go with. From research, it suggests that this is a good choice.

One (probably stupid) question, my current monitor is a g-sync one and the only one I intend to use for gaming, buying a monitor that is not g-sync (free-sync or neither!) won't cause any problems for this, will it? I'm also wonder if the new one should also be 144hz like my current Predator, I'd take a guess that switching your eyes quickly to different refresh rates isn't too good for you...

No, a secondary monitor won't affect your G-Sync one.

My secondary is just a 1080p 60hz display. For side screen stuff, I don't care much about it being high refresh rate.

Looking for guidance. I bought this VG271UP 2K monitor. It has HDMI an DisplayPort inputs.

I have a GTX 970 (Pretty sure PNY) Video card with a DVI out and 3 Minidisplay ports. I'm already using one of the DP Mini to attach to an older secondary monitor.

Unfortunately the monitor only came with an HDMI > HDMI cable. I found a Mini Display port to HDMI adapter that I had sitting around and connected the monitor. However in the display options the highest resolution I can choose on the new monitor is 1080p.

My first guess was that maybe only the DVI output on the vid card could push higher resolutions but that is a shot in the dark. My second guess would be a bad cable or adapter. Was hoping for suggestions prior to making any unnecessary purchases.

Try all the MiniDisplayPort outs? They might not all be the same.

DisplayPort is a more modern connection protocol than HDMI, and I always default to the latest-and-greatest. Old standards of HDMI will top out at 1080p, and rather than go through the rigor of figuring out which bit is old (out port, cable, in port), just go full DisplayPort - or in your case, MiniDisplayPort to DisplayPort?

For what it's worth, when it comes to supported resolutions, DVI < HDMI < DisplayPort. Which is also the chronological order that they came along.

I haven't tried the other MDPs yet. Was messing around with software solutions last night. I would think the HDMI cable that came with the monitor and monitor inputs would support 2k. That's what led me to believe my MDP > HDMI adapter might be bad.

I just remoted into my computer and GPU-Z says I have an HDMI out too. It was dark back there so might have missed it but it sure didn't look like it.

https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-spec...

Found a few converter cables at work and brought them home. Also, the video card does have a micro HDMI output that was hidden in the shadows.

Micro HDMI > HDMI works
DVI > HDMI works
MDP > HDMI doesn't on any of the ports

I wish I had a DVI and MDP > DP cable to test with.

I'm guessing this is just something weird with my vid card. I guess I will just order a DVI (or mHDMI) to HDMI to be safe.

Your card shows having an HDMI port on the pictures of it on Newegg.

The outputs are ordered DVI - DP - DP - DP - HDMI. That should be a normal HDMI output, not a mini, unless that's not the right card.

If the HDMI port is new enough it may just support 1440p 144hz fine. If they used an older port you may find yourself limited on refresh rate over HDMI.

On the other hand, just getting a good mDP - DP cable should be the most ideal solution, as it just supports everything the card supports.

For what it's worth, I tried a DP-HDMI cable once. It never once worked on any of the three monitors I tested it with at any resolution.

*I didn't read far enough. So do you have 1440p 144hz going now over some form of input or are you still stuck?

No not stuck, I just ordered my own cables because I need to bring those back to work. If you look at the card you linked it says "HDMI" but in the picture it is a mini-hdmi (You can tell because it's almost as small as the miniDPs and doesn't have the stepped edges like standard HDMI). Mine looks like that.

The cables were pretty cheap so I ordered mHDMI to HDMI and mDP to DP. I'll let you know if the latter works.

If the graphics properties show list it as 1440p 144hz that really means it's runny at 144hz correct?

Thin_J wrote:

For what it's worth, I tried a DP-HDMI cable once. It never once worked on any of the three monitors I tested it with at any resolution.

Genius! That seems to have been the issue with the display port configuration. So weird that DVI > HDMI works great but not with mDP.

Edit: And wow does this monitor look fantastic. Thank god for IPS panels! I can't stand muted colors. Scored it on sale for $310 too.

FYI, a lot of DP->HDMI cables only go one direction. You plug the DP end into the source, and the HDMI into the monitor. It doesn't work in reverse.

NSMike wrote:

FYI, a lot of DP->HDMI cables only go one direction. You plug the DP end into the source, and the HDMI into the monitor. It doesn't work in reverse.

That is *exactly* what I tried.

When that didn't work I flipped it. Still didn't work. Assumed it was bad, got a replacement, still doesn't work in any configuration. I just decided I'd never bother with one again afterward.

EvilDead wrote:

So weird that DVI > HDMI works great but not with mDP.

DVI is functionally the same video protocol as some versions of HDMI, as I understand it, just without carrying the audio. The one DVI-HDMI cable I have also works perfectly. Thankfully, no need to use it anymore at the moment because DP has become so ubiquitous on newish displays.

That's good to know. Won't mess with DP to HDMI anymore. Thanks!

Got my new monitor, but after an hour of using it I could hear a faint white noise. It comes from the power supply. It was a bit annoying, but then when I turned the pc on again, there was a loud, continuous popping sound coming from inside the monitor! I turned it off and on again and it went away. But this all adds up to sending it back for a replacement, right?

Also, just wondering, if you do have a second monitor, even if it’s idle, it will have a small impact on the FPS, right?

Clusks wrote:

But this all adds up to sending it back for a replacement, right?

Yes.

Also, just wondering, if you do have a second monitor, even if it’s idle, it will have a small impact on the FPS, right?

No. A second idle monitor will have essentially no measurable impact on game performance of the primary monitor.

*Legion* wrote:
Clusks wrote:

But this all adds up to sending it back for a replacement, right?

Yes.

Also, just wondering, if you do have a second monitor, even if it’s idle, it will have a small impact on the FPS, right?

No. A second idle monitor will have essentially no measurable impact on game performance of the primary monitor.

Urgh, so I returned it to get a refund and ordered the same monitor, thinking the buzzing noise from the power supply was related to the problem. Turns out, it may well just be the way the monitor is, as I got a new one and I can still hear the buzzing! It's either that, or I'm a bit unlucky (bought both from different online stores.) I have no idea if there's a way to get rid of it and I'm a bit unsure if I should keep it.

So, my monitor journey continues.

I was basically happy to sit with my Acer Predator XB271H that I'd had for almost 2 years, then, while playing Steep, horizontal lines just appeared everywhere! So, that pushed me into to look for something new, and I opted for the MSI - Optix MAG271C, particularly because it was affordable, had decent reviews, and could be delivered the next day.

I'm really pleased with the monitor, I initially avoided curved monitors as I heard they were not really worth it at 27". I think it was a bit foolish of me to rule out curved monitors for this reason, as I'm really not bothered by it.

So, to the XB271H, it was actually still under its 2 year warranty, so I had it RMA'ed. Acer's process for this is a little bit frustrating, as my initial request didn't even log with them. They also requested that I take a picture to show the problem, while an hour later (with no reply yet) saying my case had been accepted for a repair. They also requested that I didn't use the original box for the monitor to send it back (in the initial submit form they said do use the box though!), as the recycle them all and send them back in a blank box, but lord knows where people are able to get boxes that can securely fit a monitor.

I've got the monitor back, and honestly, I hate it! I remember when I first got it I had to tone the brightness right down, but I'm not sure now if it's even worse now it's had a new LCD screen fitted. All the whites look like they have a yellow tint. The MSI has very deep colours. I've currently got my Acer Predator at about 20 brightness and it still looks like I'm seeing everything like it's a vision in heaven.

I'm unsure if I should ask them if it's a fault with the new screen that's been fitted, as I've messed about with the settings so much that I just can't see to get it to match the MSI deepness in the slightest. I've tried plenty suggestions from looking around (most suggestions relate to the U model), but nothing seems to take away that washed out tint.

EDIT: Could this be anything to do with the different panel types? My MSI (colours look deeper) has a VA panel, while I believe my Acer Predator has a TN panel (looks more glazed over).

TN panels tend to have the least vivid colors, the worst viewing angles, and poor black levels, but the best pixel response times (least ghosting) and lowest prices.

VA tends to have better color and viewing angles than TN and better black levels than IPS, but the worst pixel response times of the three.

And then to round it out, IPS tends to have the best color of the three, the best viewing angles, has good pixel response times (if not quite TN fast), but it doesn't have VA's black levels and it has the "IPS glow" flaw.

PC monitor technologies are a choose-your-poison scenario. I have an IPS panel for my gaming PC display, an ultrawide VA panel for my work display, and a TN panel on my secondary gaming PC.

*Legion* wrote:

TN panels tend to have the least vivid colors, the worst viewing angles, and poor black levels, but the best pixel response times (least ghosting) and lowest prices.

VA tends to have better color and viewing angles than TN and better black levels than IPS, but the worst pixel response times of the three.

And then to round it out, IPS tends to have the best color of the three, the best viewing angles, has good pixel response times (if not quite TN fast), but it doesn't have VA's black levels and it has the "IPS glow" flaw.

PC monitor technologies are a choose-your-poison scenario. I have an IPS panel for my gaming PC display, an ultrawide VA panel for my work display, and a TN panel on my secondary gaming PC.

Would you say they look totally different? Like I can tell on my VA panel that the blue background I have is such a deep colour, whereas the TN it’s not because of the glazed look of things.

I’ve also been reading VA panels may not be telling the truth when it comes to response times. Mine says 1ms, but many people suggest this isn’t true. In any case, I’m not competitive gaming at all, I don’t imagine I’ll be able to tell the difference between 1ms and 4ms (I’m going to guess most people who claim it’s a huge difference also couldn’t.)

Clusks wrote:

Would you say they look totally different? Like I can tell on my VA panel that the blue background I have is such a deep colour, whereas the TN it’s not because of the glazed look of things.

Yes. I have a TN panel as a secondary monitor next to my IPS one on my gaming PC, and displaying the same background photo, there's no mistaking the quality difference. I can't tweak the TN panel to get anywhere near the IPS one. The colors are washed out in comparison. Which is why TN panels are useless for production work involving anything visual. (But just fine for millions and millions of Excel-running office PCs)

I’ve also been reading VA panels may not be telling the truth when it comes to response times. Mine says 1ms, but many people suggest this isn’t true. In any case, I’m not competitive gaming at all, I don’t imagine I’ll be able to tell the difference between 1ms and 4ms (I’m going to guess most people who claim it’s a huge difference also couldn’t.)

When it comes to response time, specs are pretty much a lie. The only meaningful measure of response time is actual visual testing, which is why I'm glad rtings.com is doing monitor testing these days in addition to their TV testing. Displays claiming the same response time can have wildly different performance in the UFO blur test.

Thanks for all the information, it's really useful! Particularly looking at rtings, I'm going to use that from now on to buy monitors. In particular, it's good they show input lag as well, which (from what I've seen) a lot of people consider more important than response time.

There are at least a handful of VA panels out there that say they run at 120hz+ but the pixel response times are just straight too slow to actually keep up with refreshing the panel that quickly, so they get smeary and frames kinda disappear. It's been proven out in testing a time or two, though I'm flubbing googling the articles about it.

Also... VA panels IMO generally have some pretty crappy viewing angles, but they're from the side. They're not as harsh a shift as TN, but they're not great. It's more visible in TV's where you're more likely to view a larger screen from wider off axis positions, but it's very much there. They typically lose color saturation and contrast the farther off axis you move.

TN's bad viewing angles are vertical, where they'll look genuinely awful if you shift far enough up or down from the display. If you set the display at the correct height and don't constantly shift the height you view the screen from, they work great for gaming displays.

If you go from sitting up to slouching to sitting up and back again all the time, you may have issues finding a good height to set a TN panel at.

I would agree that IPS is the best overall balance between response/color/etc for PC gaming especially, but I have seen some awful contrast on some IPS panels too. I wouldn't buy a TV with an IPS panel in it for anything. The black levels just straight up aren't good enough even on the best IPS panels and it ruins contrast in darker scenes.

Looking to improve my gaming experience and not sure where the best bang-for-buck value is. I have a 1060 6GB GPU and am currently using a 1080p Samsung LCD TV as a monitor. I like the 32" screen size but the image quality is no where near as good as my work monitor.

Trying to keep costing to a minimum. How far can I push the 1060? Should I stick with 1080p and go for a higher refresh rate?

Heretk wrote:

Trying to keep costing to a minimum. How far can I push the 1060? Should I stick with 1080p and go for a higher refresh rate?

I would say it depends on what your upgrade cycle looks like. How long do you plan to be on that 1060? Your monitor purchase is likely to be a longer-term buy.

A [email protected] monitor would certainly be a good pairing with a GTX 1060, but your next video card will likely be capable of doing well above 1080p. You could move up to a [email protected] monitor, which your 1060 won't really be able to max out, but your next video card will almost certainly be able to take advantage of.

If you're not going to upgrade for a long time, though, getting a 1440p monitor and having to make your 1060 really stretch to push it might not be the best idea.

*Legion* wrote:
Heretk wrote:

Trying to keep costing to a minimum. How far can I push the 1060? Should I stick with 1080p and go for a higher refresh rate?

I would say it depends on what your upgrade cycle looks like. How long do you plan to be on that 1060? Your monitor purchase is likely to be a longer-term buy.

A [email protected] monitor would certainly be a good pairing with a GTX 1060, but your next video card will likely be capable of doing well above 1080p. You could move up to a [email protected] monitor, which your 1060 won't really be able to max out, but your next video card will almost certainly be able to take advantage of.

If you're not going to upgrade for a long time, though, getting a 1440p monitor and having to make your 1060 really stretch to push it might not be the best idea.

Have been at 1080p for years. Mainly due to budget issues. On a build or refresh I will go for the best value mid-range card and stick with it until new games I want to play require an upgrade. So I do not plan to change that unless going to a higher refresh rate but also staying at 1080p won't be a value-add to my gaming experience. Though talk on this thread seems to indicate going to a higher HZ rate is a big deal.

Also would like to stay around the same monitor size (32") and also be VESA ready. Moveable monitor arms for life

The newish LG 32 inch 1440p 144hz monitor (LG 32GK650F QHD) is $300 and widely regarded as excellent, if that's in your price range.

Heretk wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
Heretk wrote:

Trying to keep costing to a minimum. How far can I push the 1060? Should I stick with 1080p and go for a higher refresh rate?

I would say it depends on what your upgrade cycle looks like. How long do you plan to be on that 1060? Your monitor purchase is likely to be a longer-term buy.

A [email protected] monitor would certainly be a good pairing with a GTX 1060, but your next video card will likely be capable of doing well above 1080p. You could move up to a [email protected] monitor, which your 1060 won't really be able to max out, but your next video card will almost certainly be able to take advantage of.

If you're not going to upgrade for a long time, though, getting a 1440p monitor and having to make your 1060 really stretch to push it might not be the best idea.

Have been at 1080p for years. Mainly due to budget issues. On a build or refresh I will go for the best value mid-range card and stick with it until new games I want to play require an upgrade. So I do not plan to change that unless going to a higher refresh rate but also staying at 1080p won't be a value-add to my gaming experience. Though talk on this thread seems to indicate going to a higher HZ rate is a big deal.

Also would like to stay around the same monitor size (32") and also be VESA ready. Moveable monitor arms for life :)

I'd say refresh rate depends on what games you play. If you're patient the monitor I got hits $300 every once in awhile at Costco. $450 right now which isn't terrible.

Heretk wrote:

currently using a 1080p Samsung LCD TV as a monitor. I like the 32" screen size but the image quality is no where near as good as my work monitor.

Have you checked if your TV uses color compression? When I was shopping for a TV to use as a monitor, I learned that (at least when it comes to 4K TVs) many TVs use color compression that makes small details like text look terrible, but others either don't use it, or don't use it when they know they are connected to a computer. I made sure I selected a 4K TV that does not compress (4:4:4 compression) when connected to a PC, and the image quality is fantastic. I don't use it much for gaming, and I have never used it for gaming that is sensitive to reaction times, so I don't know how bad the refresh rate and lag might be for that sort of application, but it is fantastic for office type use.

ElectricPi wrote:
Heretk wrote:

currently using a 1080p Samsung LCD TV as a monitor. I like the 32" screen size but the image quality is no where near as good as my work monitor.

Have you checked if your TV uses color compression? When I was shopping for a TV to use as a monitor, I learned that (at least when it comes to 4K TVs) many TVs use color compression that makes small details like text look terrible, but others either don't use it, or don't use it when they know they are connected to a computer. I made sure I selected a 4K TV that does not compress (4:4:4 compression) when connected to a PC, and the image quality is fantastic. I don't use it much for gaming, and I have never used it for gaming that is sensitive to reaction times, so I don't know how bad the refresh rate and lag might be for that sort of application, but it is fantastic for office type use.

Good to know! Mine us just a 1080p TV. And while it is okay for gaming, it is pretty lacking compared to the one use for work in terms of color and overall sharpness.