Happy Hump Day Survey!

ClockworkHouse wrote:

Buying a house. I didn't want to do it, but my wife really wanted to get out of apartments and into our own place. I didn't want to deal with all the hassles of homeownership, but so far, I have to admit that the benefits have far outweighed the frustrations. I still f*cking hate yardwork, though, and feel like the whole thing is just a status symbol.

I hear you - I was glad to unload our last year. Nearly 10 years of alternating heavy rains and severe draughts in NE Texas reaked havoc on our foundation, back porch, and provided cracks in the masonry for termites to invade. Problems were popping up so fast I couldn't keep track of them. We got fortunate to find a young, single software engineer looking for a larger home to fix the way he wanted it and got what we wanted/needed w/o argument despite telling him all the known issues.

We've been in a rental for about a year now and decided we didn't really have time to move on this year, but the wife was pressing me to buy another just a few months ago before she started school. As far as I am concerned, we can stay put in someone else's "problem" indefinitely.

Tanglebones wrote:

*Video is which Dargo is your daddy*

I do love me some Dargo. Farscape as a whole was beautifully done.

Alien Love Gardener wrote:

Good choice. I was going to go with Garrus though:
IMAGE(https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/masseffect/images/3/36/Garrus_Character_Shot.png/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/350?cb=20100323054855)

IMAGE(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/80/Versions_of_the_Doctor.jpg/300px-Versions_of_the_Doctor.jpg)

IMAGE(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/21/d7/08/21d70883953842663022bb73747b50e7.jpg)

Happy hump day!! What is your favorite gaming memory?

First one that leaps to mind: Sitting at a computer at Thanksgiving playing Starcross with my entire family huddled around me (parents, aunts/uncles, grandparents) struggling to figure out how to get through the airlock. Someone said "push the fourth bump" and everyone in the room erupted in cheers.

At 8 years old, my dad would wake me from a dead sleep on a school night if we hadn't had the chance to play RBI Baseball that day.

Playing original Myst side my side with my father, composition notebook in hand.

During my senior year of high school, staying up all night at a friend's uncle's house playing Half-Life the day before we flew to Hawaii.

DiscoDriveby wrote:

Happy hump day!! What is your favorite gaming memory?

CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B

Quintin_Stone wrote:
DiscoDriveby wrote:

Happy hump day!! What is your favorite gaming memory?

CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B

get thee to the dad joke thread sir! Well done!

thrawn82 wrote:

Playing original Myst side my side with my father, composition notebook in hand.

This, but Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis. Not to ruin the mood, but damn I wish he'd lived long enough to see Myst, he would have been over the moon with it.

Dragon Warrior for the NES was my first RPG, and I distinctly remember sneaking downstairs early to play it on weekends.

thrawn82 wrote:

get thee to the dad joke thread sir! Well done!

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

As for actual gaming memory... I'm 45, there's so many I don't know how to pick just one.

Every time I'd start a new Infocom game, there was this feeling of so much potential. New areas, new items, new puzzles. Even though I don't think I ever beat an Infocom game without hints, and most I never finished at all.

Dungeon Master on the Atari ST, one of my absolute favorite games of all time.

Playing Street Fighter 2: CE with friends in one of the college dorm lobbies.

Playing games like Ateroids, Space Invaders, Space Harrier, and Punch-Out at the bowling alley while my parents bowled in their league.

Playing Star Control 1 on my first PC, a 286.

Spending way too much time at the college computer lab, playing MUDs, MUSHes, and MUSEs.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Every time I'd start a new Infocom game, there was this feeling of so much potential. New areas, new items, new puzzles. Even though I don't think I ever beat an Infocom game without hints, and most I never finished at all.

This brings back a fond memory: Wishbringer. The only Infocom game I ever finished with no hints at all. It was made with that in mind, and playing/finishing it felt like ascending into pure IF heaven.

My favorite memories will always be our LAN parties though. Whether it was all gathering at someone's house or the big 120+ person bashes we'd put together. That was good stuff.

Beating Double Dragon in the arcade on one quarter.

DiscoDriveby wrote:

Happy hump day!! What is your favorite gaming memory?

I wrote a couple of video game inspired plays, but one was actually a full-throated game that the audience could control. It was called Brainexplode! Watching a live audience play it the first time and seeing it all come together was pure magic. It is one of the best gaming and one of the best theater experiences in my life.

benign1 wrote:
thrawn82 wrote:

Playing original Myst side my side with my father, composition notebook in hand.

This, but Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis. Not to ruin the mood, but damn I wish he'd lived long enough to see Myst, he would have been over the moon with it.

I'm sorry to hear your father missed out on that, but it sounds like you got some good time in. My father is still around but we haven't played games like that in years. Thank you for the reminder to make time to do that before its too late.

I think I did Fate of Atlantis on my own, but we did a number of these games; all the Myst games, Siberia, he introduced me to Beyond Zork and Leather Goddesses of Phobos (although I was too young to get many of the jokes) and tons of adventure titles. My uncle, his brother, who passed away earlier this month is who introduced me to what is probably my all time favorite game of that era: QFG4 Shadows of Darkness. It aligned with my interests and caught me at exactly the right age to really get it.

I remember when I became a hardcore gamer for life. December of 1996, I was 13 and we were supposed to head up to Chicago to spend the day seeing the lights and shopping and stuff, but a huge blizzard rolled in and we couldn't even get to the interstate without sliding off the road. Mom and dad called the trip and we headed back home. On the way, he stopped at the Family Video and, unlike literally every other time we stopped at a video store, he said we didn't have to decide on just one movie, but instead we could all rent whatever we wanted. He figured he might as well spend the money he was going to spend in Chicago on us in Family Video. So I moseyed on over to the game section, and saw they had finally completely replaced all the Sega games with N64 and PSX titles. Since he was in such a good mood, I went for broke and asked if we could rent a Playstation. He agreed and I rented the console along with some dinosaur game I played for all of 15 minutes and another game called Final Fantasy VII.

Firing up FFVII for the first time made something click in me. The swelling score of the opening, the scope of the game, the weird clunky dialogue, I loved it all. We weren't given a memory card, so I had to replay the same 12 hours several times. I didn't care. I still played it over and over. Returning it was hard, but I knew I had to have it again. It only took me four months before I had worked enough to afford a used PSX, FFVII, and (most importantly) a memory card. I haven't looked back since.

So many great moments when I completely immersed myself as John Marston while playing Red Dead Redemption, and that moment that included the screen swipe of the game's title card at the end will forever be etched into my brain.

As someone who plays single player almost exclusively, it's ironic (don't you think?) that my favorite gaming memory comes from an MMO.

I got into Guild Wars 2 and my main character at the time had been to 99.9% of the map. There's an achievement for getting 100%. The multi-server battleground counted towards this percentage and the last thing I needed was to reach a vista in some fort that seemed to be always controlled by another server. One afternoon I spent roughly 4 hours with my character helping the people from our server attack this fort. It took some great effort but slowly we wore them down and took possession of it. As soon as I got inside, I made a beeline to the vista I needed and got my 100% map completion. It felt great. Then I left the multi-server area and never went back.

Reading others comments here I'm pretty sure I have a few answers.

Renting and playing through Adventures of Lolo with my brother and mother. We took turns alternating when someone would die. Working as a group to solve each puzzle was so fun and maybe my fondest childhood gaming memory.

Playing MMOs back in the day, countless hours on Star Wars Galaxies and City of Heroes. One COH memory in particular involved a random mission group. We took a full team into a Tsoo mission. We managed to aggro all of the enemies in the mission to the door and faced with a mob full of Sorcerer debuffs we retreated. I remember us waiting at the door just chatting for a few minutes until one guy volunteered to go in and see if they'd returned to their spawns. The door swung open moments later as he collapsed out it dead, his chat bubble simply saying... "Not Clear"!

I also miss countless hours of COD with my friends years back. I've bounced off the series and haven't even played one in like 6 or 7 years. I'll always remember the great times with a group though, especially fondly since one of my main friends who I always played with passed away last year. We hadn't gamed in ages since he was on XBox and I had a PS4, really wish we could shoot dudes and the sh*t together just one more time.

Having the high score on Galaga at summer camp and retaining it for the entirety of the camp.