Obesity Catch-All

Yellek wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

If you exercise that is probably the reason why also despite being "heavy."

Once a week for 30m or less. Hardly a fitness routine.

This is another way to test your VO2Max.. Run/jog for a mile, make sure it is slower than 8 minutes... take your pulse when you are done.

Plug your numbers here.

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2mile.htm

Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

m
I know a few guys and girls who are clearly very gifted genetically, but they never cared about their body, it seems like such a waste for me.

Pretty offensive assumptions there. I am not genetically low weight, just narrow waist. And it's not that I "never cared about my body" it's that it's not my main priority right now. I did lose 50 lbs once before, it was very difficult and took almost all my focus at the time. Illness followed by major surgery undid those efforts and I haven't been willing to put my entire focus on weightloss since then.

goman wrote:

Right -- that is the most accurate way... but this is another way according to the NY Times article is very close to your real number.

goman wrote:

This is another way to test your VO2Max.. Run/jog for a mile, make sure it is slower than 8 minutes... take your pulse when you are done.

Plug your numbers here.

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2mile.htm

Cool stuff that I did not know. Thanks, goman!

goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

If you exercise that is probably the reason why also despite being "heavy."

Once a week for 30m or less. Hardly a fitness routine.

This is another way to test your VO2Max.. Run/jog for a mile, make sure it is slower than 8 minutes... take your pulse when you are done.

Plug your numbers here.

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2mile.htm

That is the test I took this afternoon. It put my VO2Max at 64.5. Could that be right?

Paleocon wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

If you exercise that is probably the reason why also despite being "heavy."

Once a week for 30m or less. Hardly a fitness routine.

This is another way to test your VO2Max.. Run/jog for a mile, make sure it is slower than 8 minutes... take your pulse when you are done.

Plug your numbers here.

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2mile.htm

That is the test I took this afternoon. It put my VO2Max at 64.5. Could that be right?

If it is you did hit the genetic lottery.

I am at 53.

How far off is that from the Norwegian test? Like I said mine was 2 different. Could be 1 or 0 if I change the parameters a bit. (waist size)

goman wrote:
Paleocon wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:
goman wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

If you exercise that is probably the reason why also despite being "heavy."

Once a week for 30m or less. Hardly a fitness routine.

This is another way to test your VO2Max.. Run/jog for a mile, make sure it is slower than 8 minutes... take your pulse when you are done.

Plug your numbers here.

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2mile.htm

That is the test I took this afternoon. It put my VO2Max at 64.5. Could that be right?

If it is you did hit the genetic lottery.

I am at 53.

How far off is that from the Norwegian test? Like I said mine was 2 different. Could be 1 or 0 if I change the parameters a bit. (waist size)

Norwegian test is 55. Treadmill test this afternoon was 64.5.

I ran the mile in 10 minutes and my heart rate at the end of it was 80 bpm after stop. Heart rate was 128 average during the mile run.

Paleocon wrote:

Norwegian test is 55. Treadmill test this afternoon was 64.5.

I ran the mile in 10 minutes and my heart rate at the end of it was 80 bpm after stop. Heart rate was 128 average during the mile run.

I think you are supposed to use the higher number. And not wait until your heart rate goes down.

The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete completes one mile, records the time and immediately records the athlete’s heart rate (bpm)
goman wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Norwegian test is 55. Treadmill test this afternoon was 64.5.

I ran the mile in 10 minutes and my heart rate at the end of it was 80 bpm after stop. Heart rate was 128 average during the mile run.

I think you are supposed to use the higher number. And not wait until your heart rate goes down.

The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete completes one mile, records the time and immediately records the athlete’s heart rate (bpm)

Well, he sort of did. He took my heart rate over 60 seconds and it dropped from 125 to close to 60 nearly immediately. He explained that what they were measuring was recovery.

Yellek wrote:
Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

m
I know a few guys and girls who are clearly very gifted genetically, but they never cared about their body, it seems like such a waste for me.

Pretty offensive assumptions there. I am not genetically low weight, just narrow waist. And it's not that I "never cared about my body" it's that it's not my main priority right now. I did lose 50 lbs once before, it was very difficult and took almost all my focus at the time. Illness followed by major surgery undid those efforts and I haven't been willing to put my entire focus on weightloss since then.

I wasn't talking about you though, just people I know. Why'd you take it so personal? I don't even know what you look like, and how would I know about your surgeries etc? : p

It was just a comment about people I know, that's all.

Paleocon wrote:
goman wrote:
Paleocon wrote:

Norwegian test is 55. Treadmill test this afternoon was 64.5.

I ran the mile in 10 minutes and my heart rate at the end of it was 80 bpm after stop. Heart rate was 128 average during the mile run.

I think you are supposed to use the higher number. And not wait until your heart rate goes down.

The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete completes one mile, records the time and immediately records the athlete’s heart rate (bpm)

Well, he sort of did. He took my heart rate over 60 seconds and it dropped from 125 to close to 60 nearly immediately. He explained that what they were measuring was recovery.

I used the calculator with the higher number. 128 BPM... 10 minute mile... 199 lbs is 55. At 199 lbs this perfectly matches the Norwegian calculator for you.

205 = 54.58
200 = 54.95
195 = 55.32
190 = 55.69

I don't know how much you weigh but I bet it is in this range.

Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:
Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

m
I know a few guys and girls who are clearly very gifted genetically, but they never cared about their body, it seems like such a waste for me.

Pretty offensive assumptions there. I am not genetically low weight, just narrow waist. And it's not that I "never cared about my body" it's that it's not my main priority right now. I did lose 50 lbs once before, it was very difficult and took almost all my focus at the time. Illness followed by major surgery undid those efforts and I haven't been willing to put my entire focus on weightloss since then.

I wasn't talking about you though, just people I know. Why'd you take it so personal? I don't even know what you look like, and how would I know about your surgeries etc? : p

It was just a comment about people I know, that's all.

Ah sorry. Since the comment was right after me saying it the good numbers I got from that test had to be genetic lottery, it seemed you were saying it about me.

Yellek wrote:
Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:
Mex wrote:
Yellek wrote:

Interesting. So in spite of being near the line between overweight/obese, I am slightly under for my fitness age and in the good range for VO2Max. Mostly due to not carrying weight primarily around my waist. This seems to lean quite a bit towards genetic lottery territory.

m
I know a few guys and girls who are clearly very gifted genetically, but they never cared about their body, it seems like such a waste for me.

Pretty offensive assumptions there. I am not genetically low weight, just narrow waist. And it's not that I "never cared about my body" it's that it's not my main priority right now. I did lose 50 lbs once before, it was very difficult and took almost all my focus at the time. Illness followed by major surgery undid those efforts and I haven't been willing to put my entire focus on weightloss since then.

I wasn't talking about you though, just people I know. Why'd you take it so personal? I don't even know what you look like, and how would I know about your surgeries etc? : p

It was just a comment about people I know, that's all.

Ah sorry. Since the comment was right after me saying it the good numbers I got from that test had to be genetic lottery, it seemed you were saying it about me.

No, I'm sorry, I should've figured out you'd think that since I was responding to you :s Good time to bow out of this thread because I don't want to offend any more people, this is a delicate subject!

Mex wrote:

No, I'm sorry, I should've figured out you'd think that since I was responding to you :s Good time to bow out of this thread because I don't want to offend any more people, this is a delicate subject!

Your bowing out of the thread offends me.

cheeba wrote:
Mex wrote:

No, I'm sorry, I should've figured out you'd think that since I was responding to you :s Good time to bow out of this thread because I don't want to offend any more people, this is a delicate subject!

Your bowing out of the thread offends me.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/tK2zYtZ.gif)

Paleocon wrote:

On a more personal note, I just finished my company offered fitness assessment....

...I am certainly no shining example of a gym rat by any means, but my investment (7 hours/week) is pretty modest. And frankly, it isn't that hard.

This is interesting to me. Let me respond with some numbers of mine. I had my quarterly physical yesterday (yes, I have to have them quarterly). I have a rather miserable headcold complicating things, but this is what they found out.

My blood pressure was 110/74. My resting heart rate was 68. My cholesterol is 164 (but the LDL is up to 99 - gotta work on that). Urine testing shows my kidneys are not throwing sugar or blood. Go me!

I got the detailed results from my ophthalmologist's appointment, and it looks like my retinopathy is improving - two of the spots in my left eye have completely healed. The results of the testing the vascular specialist my doctor hooked me up with to make sure my neurapathy isn't complicated by circulation problems tells me my circulatory system is clean and clear all over and my heart is healthy. He wants to do the whole blower test thing again once I'm over this cold; the last time I had that was right before my surgery. The neurologist doesn't like the results he got on the EMG for the neurapathy, though. The nerve damage is still worsening, but at least it doesn't appear to be spreading much now.

I work out between 45 minutes and an hour five days a week (the days I do strength workouts on top of the cardio are longer than the days they just have me doing cardio) using the program my doctor gave me. The other two days I go for a walk with a friend of mine; they will become full workouts when her doctor gives her leave to start (she has serious back problems on top of her weight).

I test my blood sugar four times a day and those results are emailed to my doctor. I have a detailed food/medication journal detailing how well I've followed the diet plan the nutritionist has set out for me. I cook for myself, and since I work from home I have even less reason to stray from it than most.

Between the exercise, food logging, testing and everything else I spend a lot more than 7 hours a week on this, I can assure you.

And despite all that I do, all is not rosy from that appointment. My A1C test (it's a measure of average blood sugar levels over time) went up to 6.1 (top of the normal range is 5.5; "under control" diabetes is below 7), and I regained four pounds of the 15 I'd lost at the last one. That's the highest it's been since I started the medication. I got it down to 5.8 with diet alone; with the medication it has run 5.4 for over 2 years, which is in the normal range. According to my doctor's assessment of my records, it's not from what I'm doing so much as the disease itself and the side effects of two of my medications. If it follows the same trend in January, we're going to have to adjust dosage.

The weather is killing my arthritis. It happens every year, and despite the new medication for that I started this summer, that's not going all that well. Especially now that it looks like my wrists and left ankle are joining the joint problem party. Don't get me started on my allergies.

The lichen planus is back again, so that means another 2 week stint of steroid mouthwash and partially explains why I've been feeling like I'm swimming through sand to even get out of bed (lichen planus is an autoimmune disorder when your body for some reason decides your mucus membranes or skin are an intruder and attacks them). This headcold and the after-effect from my flu-shot isn't helping either. For more fun, one of the side effects of steroids are - you guessed it - weight gain.

Still having complications from that whole girl-stuff thing I over-shared about in that thread I wrote up when I had my surgery. BTW - that's where the lichen planus came from. In my case, it was started off by an allergic reaction to a medication combined with said girl problems. Once you have it started it doesn't go away; it comes and goes for the rest of your life. And eruptions can be made worse/or started by stress. See "open issues" section below.

Genetics are a huge factor for me. My mother and all her siblings are Type 1 diabetics diagnosed before the age of 2. Two of them are dead because of it. There is a history of it on my father's side as well. With attention and monitoring my whole life, I only have Type II, and I didn't get it until my 40's (except when I was pregnant; I was Type 1 when pregnant with my daughters). I also inherit tendencies to both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, several forms of cancer, and a couple mental illnesses.

Ironically, lot of the rest of it comes from making those active choices you're suggesting. The left shoulder, left hip, and left knee arthritis come from traumatic injury playing hockey in college. The left knee gets a double-whammy from a skiing accident when I'd fooled myself into thinking I was recovered enough from the first one to try that again. The asthma is a left-over from a bout of aspirant pneumonia I had when I accidentally ended up with a 70 pound king salmon in my dipnet instead of the expected 20 pound sockeye while standing chest-deep in the Kasilof River, and made worse by my move to Seattle with it's insane pollen and mold counts.

I do have some "open issues"; that's what I call choices I make that are a sore point with my doctor. I haven't worked less than 80 hours a week in 7 months; more than half of them have been 100. This week is already looking ugly. I've got stress from my daughter's wedding, my job, my mother's cancer, and a whole raft of other crap going on. She calls me a "sleep camel" - I don't sleep for three or four days, then I get about six hours, then lather rinse repeat. Those are issues I can and am working to improve, but honestly, the only cure for the wedding is for it to be done. The cure for the job is to get through this project and see about getting another one. The only cure for dealing with my mom is for her cancer to go away again. There is no cure for my crazy aunt, except maybe taking away her corkscrew and her phone.

I looked at that online calculator, and it has some serious holes. When I plug the few facts that online calculator asks for into it, I get a fitness age of over 75 years. From what I can tell by reading their FAQ, my guess is that's because of my waistline. And that's with it being over six inches smaller than it was a year ago, but I actually weigh more than I did then. I've been working hard to strengthen my core from that surgery I had. Yes, it is a problem, but I'm already treating it.

I'm glad it's easy for you. It's actually hopeful to me, in a weird sort of way. The fact that you are so disconnected from this sort of slog gives me hope when it feels like the whole world is f*cked up and nothing works. But if you think that it's easy for everyone if they just put their mind to it and that those things that work for you work for everyone, you're sadly mistaken.

Judging by your posts, I bet if you saw me on the street, you'd think the same things you think about everyone at your office. I might get some sympathy points from the cane, but with the way you keep going on maybe not. You would be that person who gives me sh*t for going into DQ because they assume I'm there to eat four sundaes or something instead of to buy the fat free, sugar free fudge bars. This is what I get when I buy enough ice cream for my son's 15-guest birthday party; that was this afternoon. Even though it was no sugar added frozen yogurt.

That's why this conversation is so maddening. Even if you were right and all I had to do was "just" do something, the process of losing weight at the scale I need to takes years to do safely and have any real chance at all at keeping it off. At any point along the line, you see someone in passing and you make that judgement call. You have no way of knowing where they are in this process. Despite all that crap above, I'm still a 115 pounds lighter than I was three years ago. All the indicators my doctor can muster show I'm in pretty good shape, especially considering what I'm dealing with. But you don't know that. All you see is my current pants-size and look down your nose.

That kind of judgmental attitude doesn't inspire people; it hurts. If you're already having a hard time keeping going, having someone imply that how far you've come isn't good enough makes it harder to actually do what you think they should.

momgamer wrote:

That kind of judgmental attitude doesn't inspire people; it hurts. If you're already having a hard time keeping going, having someone imply that how far you've come isn't good enough makes it harder to actually do what you think they should.

THIS.

But I'm sure someone out there thinks that your entire post is just a bunch of excuses. I mean, come, on, you gained all that weight in the first place! That gives me the urge to engage in some sort of self-harm, whether it be drink, food, or something.

I really need to get back on track. I was sitting at about 200 at 6ft tall and I've always been a bigger guy. Was doing p90x and the like, but then I screwed my back up badly. For 5 or 6 months I was barely sleeping and constantly hurting. Once that finally went away, I had packed on 60 pounds or so. Not sure the point of me typing it out other than forcing myself to get back on the horse so to speak.

obirano wrote:

I really need to get back on track. I was sitting at about 200 at 6ft tall and I've always been a bigger guy. Was doing p90x and the like, but then I screwed my back up badly. For 5 or 6 months I was barely sleeping and constantly hurting. Once that finally went away, I had packed on 60 pounds or so. Not sure the point of me typing it out other than forcing myself to get back on the horse so to speak.

Hmm, is there a weight loss thread? If not, we need one so we can post our progress and cheer each other on.

sometimesdee wrote:
obirano wrote:

I really need to get back on track. I was sitting at about 200 at 6ft tall and I've always been a bigger guy. Was doing p90x and the like, but then I screwed my back up badly. For 5 or 6 months I was barely sleeping and constantly hurting. Once that finally went away, I had packed on 60 pounds or so. Not sure the point of me typing it out other than forcing myself to get back on the horse so to speak.

Hmm, is there a weight loss thread? If not, we need one so we can post our progress and cheer each other on.

There is one somewhere.

http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/4...

This says 2011,but it's current.

There is also a fitness thread (http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/1...) for those that want to dip their toe into those waters. There is also a jogging thread (http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/1...).

Note that those posts were not meant as fat-shaming or an indication that those are the only ways to lose weight. They are simply there as links for those for whom exercise is something they want to do as part of their plan at losing weight.

momgamer wrote:

Very long, personal, and touching post culminating in...

That kind of judgmental attitude doesn't inspire people; it hurts. If you're already having a hard time keeping going, having someone imply that how far you've come isn't good enough makes it harder to actually do what you think they should.

I get that and when I see folks like you in the gym, I am, believe it or not, inspired by the fact that you and others like you are taking the steps to better health seriously.

To the point of what I think when I see someone who is obese walking into a DQ, I don't really. It is pretty commonplace where I live to the point that it is normative behavior. If anything, I am more inclined to think "jeez, why go to that crap when there is a Goodberry's down the street".

Additionally, I don't have a problem with overweight people (being one). If anything, I have a problem with folks who whine about being powerless to affect their situations when it is obvious they have not made good faith efforts to do so. And no, I don't assume that every fat person I see is in that category. Nor do I "shame" them in thought, word, or action.

Over the years, I have helped probably two dozen people begin their journey to better health through diet and exercise. All have asked for my help. And of that two dozen, about half were actually serious enough to show up to appointments on a regular basis. I am told from personal trainer friends that that number is actually pretty high and I credit that to the fact that I ask them straight off how serious they are.

Of that dozen or so that do take it seriously enough to show up, half seem more interested in using the time to talk about how rough their struggle is than in doing simple things like walking on an incline treadmill or learning proper form for basic lifts.

But among the six who took it seriously and developed proper habits, I have witnessed folks go from 300+ pounds and unable to ascend two flights of stairs without fear of passing out to running their first half marathon, competing in their first thai boxing match, and developing the self confidence to apply for the job she always wanted. And yes, I tear up when I see those corny Youtube videos of folks going from obese, disabled, and giving up on life to health e.g.

So I know great things are possible starting with minor changes. I know it is possible to exercise willpower in small and increasing doses to make enormous life changes or overcome tremendous obstacles. When I hear a story like yours, I don't see where you are right now, but the fact that you are struggling to be where you want to be (and the distance you have already traveled). That effort, to me, is worth a billion times more than the excuses I hear constantly.

Keep it up.

That DDP yoga video *always* gets me. Right in the feels, to use the terms the kids say these days.

Good point about only seeing you at one point in time, momgamer. I'm down 25 pounds since January, but I'm still overweight, and I see the looks I get from (thankfully few) people.

Working 16 hour days 6-7 days a week for the same amount of time hasn't done much to help with the weight loss, either, nor is the stress of having to stop making payments on my old house and try to get the bank to take it back. Not making those payments goes against everything I believe, and it's twisting me up inside horribly, and as usual, the stress is f*cking with my system.

Right now I'm about 10 pounds overweight. I've lost 24 pounds of baby weight over the last few months using Weight Watchers. I have always been athletic - pretty fast century rides, lots of endurance exercise and strength training.

What I like about Weight Watchers is how educational it is. The system is designed to favor people eating in a more healthy way and to adopt more sensible portions. That's great, and it very helpful. It helps to break habits that keep weight on. You keep a food journal and track "points" for food and activity. Then you see the amount of weight lost or gained and adjust.

But it's yet another thing to keep track of every day. It gets easier once you adopt healthier eating habits, but still. It is effort, and when one is busy already, such as when you are working full-time, have kids, and then have to track food eaten and (ideally) fit exercise in as well, it's not easy. It has to be prioritized. It is also not a cheap program, though you can use free iPad apps and other ways to get around that. So you must have resources to do it at all.

Still, it is eye-opening to see the degree to which our culture encourages people to eat a lot of unhealthy food all the time. Want a snack when you're out and didn't bring anything? It's possible to get something healthy or with a reasonable calorie count, but most of the options in a convenience or drug store are highly processed and packaged to encourage overeating. Look at bags of potato chips. The size that I see most often is 3 oz., with 1 oz. being the regular serving size at 160 calories. But studies show that most people will not portion out the package as labelled. Most people eat the entire bag at one sitting. That's 480 calories.

The studies that show that most people will eat the bag also show that it isn't willpower, or lack thereof, that is the reason, it's context. People eat more when plates are larger. There is a famous study that showed people typically ate significantly more soup from a bowl that slowly refilled itself than from one with a finite amount. Our appetites have a big psychological component as well. The man who conducted that and many similar studies wrote a book that I assign students when I teach my ancient food course, Mindless Eating.

So you really have to fight the environment that encourages us to eat badly all the time. In some respects things are better, since calorie counts are easier to find, but still.

I have to make a conscious effort all the time not to eat too much, and the effort adds up. I'm basically very healthy and fortunate not to have conditions that make it easier to gain/harder to take off. I'm also able to exercise. But again, it is a conscious effort because I feel like I'm bombarded with opportunities to eat everywhere.

I really do think the deck is stacked against most of us, since food manufacturers design their products to take advantage of our natural vulnerabilities when it comes to food. The people who designed the frozen food line "Anytizers" are evil geniuses. It's all really fatty, high-calorie stuff, and it's not just for before a meal - it's for any time you are hungry! Whee! And the name seems designed to make it all seem like harmless fun.

Russia is now taking a brief exercise routine as payment for riding the subway.

Would I do 30 squats to save a dollar? Maybe, although at that price point it'd be more for an excuse to exercise than the money.

Actually, scratch that -- the city bus in town costs 1.50 one way, and I take it four times a day. I'd do 120 squats a day to save 6 dollars.

Thoughts?

And here I pay money to exercise (gym membership). In Soviet Russia, exercise pays YOU!

My understanding is that this is just pre-Olympics advertisement stunt by some Russian bank which teamed up with the Russian Olympic Committee to install one (1) such co-branded ticketing machine in the foyer of one (1) subway station. A government program it is not.

Seth wrote:

Russia is now taking a brief exercise routine as payment for riding the subway.

Would I do 30 squats to save a dollar? Maybe, although at that price point it'd be more for an excuse to exercise than the money.

Actually, scratch that -- the city bus in town costs 1.50 one way, and I take it four times a day. I'd do 120 squats a day to save 6 dollars.

Thoughts?

I think it a great, great way to encourage exercise without mandating it.

I'm not sure if this is the right thread for this, but it involves obesity and gaming...

Oh, Shark Tank. There's a guy selling a device called Omni, which works with Oculus Rift to make a more immersive experience. While Oculus Rift gives the vision, the Omni lets you run around in various video games.

The sharks all passed, not only because the Omni guy overvalued his business, but because:

Robert Herjavec wrote:

Gamers are lazy... they don't want to exercise.

Daymond John said something about most gamers being able to "double as plus-size models."

I'm sad that the Omni guy didn't mention the success of WiiFit, Just Dance, and other games that center around motion.

Do you really have to choose between gaming and exercise? I played Dance Dance Revolution pretty frequently until I got downstairs neighbors.