Xbox One Catch-all

ClockworkHouse wrote:
Rykin wrote:

I messed around with OnLive back in the day and it was ok. Not something I would have wanted to pay for though.

OnLive launched in 2010. That's like a hundred dog years ago in tech.

Yea well the broadband service in my area hasn't improved much since then

I was really impressed with Mixer's low latency streaming tech back when they launched that and have wanted them to roll that tech into other services (like Remote Desktop) so I imagine this is sharing some DNA with that.

Microsoft is on the verge of announcing a new Xbox — here are 5 crucial components it needs to compete with Sony's huge lead

Get ready to say goodbye to the Xbox One - Microsoft is on the verge of a new generation of video game consoles.

The big rumor going around is that Microsoft plans to detail the next Xbox consoles at this year's big video game trade show, E3, in June. That could be an opportunity to get out ahead of Sony, whose PlayStation 4 dominated the past five years.

So, what does Microsoft have to do to get the Xbox back on top? Here are a few key places to start:

As someone who has fairly recently bought an X1X, I’m not sure how I feel about this.

I wouldn't worry. I don't expect any of the games the launch with the new console to require the new console. My guess is that that we will see more consoles more often as they start treating them more like smartphones.

And the earliest we will see it is Christmas 2020, and I won't be surprised if it ends up being 2021. There is a chance that if Microsoft thinks Sony is not ready that they will launch early and try to force Sony to move early. It seems like Sony would much prefer 2021.

To be honest, I'm happy enough with the XB1X, that I'm not sure I will upgrade at launch. I didn't when the 360 launched, as it just seemed to early. I actually won my first 360 in a GWJ Donation drive way back in the day, but wasn't ready to buy one yet. I think I will feel the same way with the XB1X. We'll see what the features and the hook is.

Jayhawker wrote:

I wouldn't worry. I don't expect any of the games the launch with the new console to require the new console.

That's a tough question. I think we can be pretty certain that all current gen Xbox One game will run, as will all the BC games from previous generations. But, I don't have any expectation that the first party Xbox 2020 launch games will run on run on Xbox One or X1X hardware.

The OG/360 transition and the 360/X1 transition featured significantly improved GPUs with relatively modest CPU boosts. Available rumors indicate that this transition will have a much larger boost to the CPU side. Also, yesterday's rumor was that the new Xbox will have some dedicated physics processing silicon (Microsoft owns Havok, Havok is the major physics middleware provider, the libraries are pretty mature, and Microsoft certainly knows exactly what hardware they need to provide major benefits - so it doesn't exactly sound like an implausible rumor).

Anyway, with the rumored raytracing hardware, the physics issue, and meaningfully increased CPU power, it sounds like the new generation will have enough improved capabilities that games targeted to the platform may not be easily downgradable to the current X1X specs.

It's hard to say though. There's certainly a strong business case for making all their games available to their current install base. On the other hand, maybe they'll do that through their streaming service - essentially turning the current X1X and maybe X1S install base into streaming clients.

If MS is not pushing devs, both first party and third, to scale their games so that they can play well on a variety of systems, like a dev would for PC, they are screwing this up.

Jayhawker wrote:

If MS is not pushing devs, both first party and third, to scale their games so that they can play well on a variety of systems, like a dev would for PC, they are screwing this up.

Pretty sure thats exactly what they will do.

My assumption–with their focus on streaming and backward compatibility and viewing the Xbox as a kind of cross-platform platform–is that they'll introduce new low-end hardware that's about on par with the X1X, introduce new high end hardware that's a significant leap forward, and leave game streaming as an option for the X1S and other platforms. Basically, the X1X becomes the new minimum for development, with games "enhanced" for the fancy pants hardware.

One thing I'm curious about is if the console market is really ready for this kind of rolling generational hardware model. Long-term backward compatibility opens up opportunities to sell completed games from publishers' back catalogs. At the same time, it cuts down on opportunities to sell remasters, enhanced editions, and other high price cross-generation releases. That's been a healthy business for publishers this generation; how keen are they to give that up?

I suspect it will have something to do with killing off the used games market, which is really in its last throes anyway.

Do we have #'s on enhanced editions, etc.? How profitable are they (sales - costs to remake/market)?

I'm sure things like Halo: MCC are highly profitable (?) but the rest of that stuff seems like it might be harder to guarantee BIG profits.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

My assumption–with their focus on streaming and backward compatibility and viewing the Xbox as a kind of cross-platform platform–is that they'll introduce new low-end hardware that's about on par with the X1X, introduce new high end hardware that's a significant leap forward, and leave game streaming as an option for the X1S and other platforms. Basically, the X1X becomes the new minimum for development, with games "enhanced" for the fancy pants hardware.

One thing I'm curious about is if the console market is really ready for this kind of rolling generational hardware model. Long-term backward compatibility opens up opportunities to sell completed games from publishers' back catalogs. At the same time, it cuts down on opportunities to sell remasters, enhanced editions, and other high price cross-generation releases. That's been a healthy business for publishers this generation; how keen are they to give that up?

I think you can still do the remastered approach even in a rolling upgrade/unified platform approach. We've seen it work on the PC side with a few titles so I'm sure that given enough time they can remake titles that can take advantage of the new upgrades whizzbang features. I would think they would adopt the PC platforms "forced" obsolescence where every X amount of years the really old consoles stop getting titles that work (even if like in the smartphone world they lock out the old console from a key OS upgrade)

So xbox game pass is $1 for 3 months for new accounts (I think its only new accounts, may also be inactive accounts). For a buck i signed up. Then immediately canceled the reoccurring payment. Kinda too good to pass up IMO.

I am somewhat interested in the all digital xbox s but am a bit baffled that they would release a new console that wasn't xbox one enhanced. That price point, $250, is really high for an S, when you can regularly find them new for under 200. I would do an all digital Xbox one X for 200-250 but an S, even all digital, just seems like a 150 or under console.

I'm guessing that if I buy the all digital console, I won't be able to play my old 360 games that I have on DVD? Kind of a deal breaker for me.

SallyNasty wrote:

I am somewhat interested in the all digital xbox s but am a bit baffled that they would release a new console that wasn't xbox one enhanced. That price point, $250, is really high for an S, when you can regularly find them new for under 200. I would do an all digital Xbox one X for 200-250 but an S, even all digital, just seems like a 150 or under console.

Yeah, I was really confused by that price too. You can buy an XBox One S on Amazon right now for $207. I was expecting the digital xbox to come in at $199 at most.

The only $199 version I saw said discontinued and has a 500GB hard drive instead of a TB.

I guess it comes with some bundles games but def should be $199 or less.

$250 is crazy. I mean, crazy for this late in the console cycle.

Ideally I would have hoped this thing would have been a smaller form factor and used for streaming games and movies. But at the same/more cost with the same footprint? It's nuts.

That said, X-Box One S All Digital breaks down into XBOX SAD (thanks giant bomb), so I approve.

It will be down to $199 by Christmas probably.