So Long, My Wii — Now Playing: ?

mrtomaytohead wrote:

People play games on LCD TVs?

Don't be mean

mrtomaytohead wrote:

People play games on LCD TVs?

Get back in your time machine! This is the distant future, 2012, where the differences between plasma and LCD are negligible! You mustn't see things you can't understand, and pollute the space-time continuum!

This is what I get for leaving out the word 'still' and a smiley?

I still hate all of you!

Spoiler:

hmmmm... maybe every statement doesn't need "still"...

I'm mildly surprised I'm not still playing on a CRT TV. It was Silent Hill: Shattered Memories that did it with its squinty-text I still couldn't read at 480i.

There still isn't a fully functional (and simple) workaround for using old light guns on non-CRT TV's, is there?

ClockworkHouse wrote:

I'm mildly surprised I'm not still playing on a CRT TV. It was Silent Hill: Shattered Memories that did it with its squinty-text I still couldn't read at 480i.

I went and bought an HDMI converter for the Wii (instead of the component output), to upgrade from the standard output of the Wii. But Monster Hunter Tri still had small squinty text...

I love this community, where else would I find a thread this long devoted to the Wii. Awesome.

We got the Wii the second holiday season after launch, and its been our only console. I made that decision mostly because we have young kids and I wanted gaming to be a little more active.

Over the years though, and as this thread demonstrates, I've found plenty of games for me as well.

The one that hooked into my brain and wouldn't let go was Monster Hunter Tri. I'll be intersted to see what you think of that one when you get to it.

gamerparent wrote:

I love this community, where else would I find a thread this long devoted to the Wii. Awesome.

We got the Wii the second holiday season after launch, and its been our only console. I made that decision mostly because we have young kids and I wanted gaming to be a little more active.

Over the years though, and as this thread demonstrates, I've found plenty of games for me as well.

The one that hooked into my brain and wouldn't let go was Monster Hunter Tri. I'll be intersted to see what you think of that one when you get to it.

Here's a somewhat longer Wii-centric thread that might interest you. Plenty of impressions.

Blind_Evil wrote:

Plenty of impressions.

Yeah.... we like to talk...

Citizen86 wrote:
Blind_Evil wrote:

Plenty of impressions.

Yeah.... we like to enable...

FTFY

garion333 wrote:
Citizen86 wrote:
Blind_Evil wrote:

Plenty of impressions.

Yeah.... we like to enable...

FTFY

Get back to the Deals thread, hippie!

I'm debating holding off on Monster Hunter 3 and playing it on the 3DS and/or Wii U instead. It'd certainly knock some time off my Wii list.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

I'm debating holding off on Monster Hunter 3 and playing it on the 3DS and/or Wii U instead. It'd certainly knock some time off my Wii list. :P

That it would. I think I spent upwards of 150 hours on that game.

Plus the MHTri servers are due to be shut down by the time (or around the time) Ultimate arrives, it might make for a better experience.

Blind_Evil wrote:

Here's a somewhat longer Wii-centric thread that might interest you. Plenty of impressions.

Thanks!

I guarantee the MH Tri servers remain up until 2014 at the earliest. All they've said is they would be closed "eventually."

It's just my gut saying that, but I'm confident. Capcom is never in a rush with these things. Resident Evil: Outbreak lasted eight years, Monster Hunter lasted seven. MH Tri has only been out since 2009 in Japan and 2010 here.

All that said, the Wii U version will be the one to own. At the very least we'll have system-level friend lists, and text input without a keyboard will be easier thanks to the gamepad. Not to mention all the new weapons types and monsters, the HD graphics, etc.

Stupid Wii sensor bar. I set it on top of my monitor instead and it stays but it tends to fall over at a moment's notice. I want to mount the darn thing and make it stay.

JohnKillo wrote:

Stupid Wii sensor bar. I set it on top of my monitor instead and it stays but it tends to fall over at a moment's notice. I want to mount the darn thing and make it stay.

Use the double sided tape that came in the system box?

mrtomaytohead wrote:
JohnKillo wrote:

Stupid Wii sensor bar. I set it on top of my monitor instead and it stays but it tends to fall over at a moment's notice. I want to mount the darn thing and make it stay.

Use the double sided tape that came in the system box?

I don't think mine has double-sided tape. It came with a sticky-ish pad on the bottom, but it's not super-sticky. Actually just yesterday I licked my finger and wiped it off, some of the dust came off and it was stickier again.

Citizen86 wrote:
mrtomaytohead wrote:
JohnKillo wrote:

Stupid Wii sensor bar. I set it on top of my monitor instead and it stays but it tends to fall over at a moment's notice. I want to mount the darn thing and make it stay.

Use the double sided tape that came in the system box?

I don't think mine has double-sided tape. It came with a sticky-ish pad on the bottom, but it's not super-sticky. Actually just yesterday I licked my finger and wiped it off, some of the dust came off and it was stickier again.

The super sticky double sided tape/pads that came in the box of my launch wii make it feel like the base is about to snap any time I've had to remove it, and I've done that like 3 times now with the same pieces remaining on the tiny clear plastic stand.

Don't look now, but I made some progress! My wife and I finished up Rayman Origins last night.

As a co-op experience, it's pretty fun. The ability to respawn lost co-op partners, and to not have to manage any sort of life system, makes for a nice experience that tamps down some of the difficulty. So long as one partner is still alive, you both have a chance to progress through the level.

The only time co-op isn't a solid experience is late in the game when you're asked to run through high speed chase sequences. Basically, you run through a series of timed obstacles, like debris falling from the sky, at break-neck speed; if you slow down or make a minor mistake, you die. The problem for co-op is that all of the event triggers are based on whichever player gets to them first, leaving other players just enough behind that they literally won't be able to continue. In one sequence, being a step or two behind my wife meant that I simply couldn't continue. I had to die and watch her play for awhile. It turns what has to that point been a fun co-op experience into essentially a single-player game.

The Wii version is a nice port. The graphics are pretty even if they're not in HD, and I don't believe any content was removed from the HD versions. The only thing I wasn't completely comfortable with was the layout of the control scheme for the Wiimote alone. You hold the remote sideways, and in order you run, you need to hold down the B button (the trigger) with your left index finger. It's simply not comfortable for long periods of time. This isn't a big deal for the majority of the game when running isn't that important, but you absolutely must use the run button during the game's lengthy, less-than-stellar underwater segments.

I have mixed feelings about this, though, because the simplicity of the basic Wiimote control scheme makes the game much more accessible and much more appealing for non-gamers. The 360/PS3 control scheme with the run button on the triggers is more comfortable, but it comes with the baggage of the whole rest of the controller. All 200-odd buttons and sticks of it. It's anecdotal, but I can almost always get non-gamers or former gamers to try out a game if I hand them the more simple controller.

(For those of you who don't like the sideways Wiimote thing, the game does support the classic controller.)

So Rayman Origins gets a recommendation as a good co-op game. I wasn't completely crazy about it like some other people were (I'd give it a C+ or a B- on its own), but my wife and I did have a really good time playing it together.

I picked up Rayman Origins on some sale, I think from Best Buy. I'll have to see if my wife wants to give it a try with me. She doesn't have a big interest in games, but she'll play with me if I ask. We played some Super Mario together a while ago.

I haven't had much time for gaming lately, so progress through Metroid Prime 2 has been painfully slow. However, last night I hit what I thought was the end of the game: I'd defeated a big, bad-ass boss for the last weapon upgrade, and I'd restored the last of the temples and been rewarded with the last armor upgrade (which is ugly as sin, by the way). In a game like this, where there's a slow drip of equipment and power upgrades, I expect to wrap things up shortly after I get the last of the upgrades. Not with this one.

Instead, I've been sent on a quest to crawl back through the Dark World versions of each area looking for nine hidden keys. I've been given no hints to where they are, and nothing to tell me when I've found all the keys in a given area. I already found one by accident, and it was so well-hidden that I despair a little bit about how long it will take me to find the other eight.

It reminds me a bit of Skyward Sword and the way that game builds to a glorious fever pitch and then instead of capping it off, it makes you run around for another couple hours collecting the Song of the Hero. I might end up enjoying parts of the key hunt in Prime 2—just like I enjoyed parts of the Song of the Hero—but I finished my playing session last night in a bit of a huff. I felt like I'd been given a big plate of padding when I was wanting a resolution.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

I haven't had much time for gaming lately, so progress through Metroid Prime 2 has been painfully slow. However, last night I hit what I thought was the end of the game: I'd defeated a big, bad-ass boss for the last weapon upgrade, and I'd restored the last of the temples and been rewarded with the last armor upgrade (which is ugly as sin, by the way). In a game like this, where there's a slow drip of equipment and power upgrades, I expect to wrap things up shortly after I get the last of the upgrades. Not with this one.

Instead, I've been sent on a quest to crawl back through the Dark World versions of each area looking for nine hidden keys. I've been given no hints to where they are, and nothing to tell me when I've found all the keys in a given area. I already found one by accident, and it was so well-hidden that I despair a little bit about how long it will take me to find the other eight.

It reminds me a bit of Skyward Sword and the way that game builds to a glorious fever pitch and then instead of capping it off, it makes you run around for another couple hours collecting the Song of the Hero. I might end up enjoying parts of the key hunt in Prime 2—just like I enjoyed parts of the Song of the Hero—but I finished my playing session last night in a bit of a huff. I felt like I'd been given a big plate of padding when I was wanting a resolution.

I had a similar experience in Wind Waker where I thought I was near the end and then had to go collect a bunch of things (triforce pieces,maybe?). It bummed me out enough that I stopped playing.

Yeah, there's a bit Triforce quest at the end of Wind Waker. That one didn't bother me so much since they were marked out on a map and thus easier to burn through. I was also way invested in the world and characters of that game in a way I'm not with Prime 2, so that also makes a difference.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

Instead, I've been sent on a quest to crawl back through the Dark World versions of each area looking for nine hidden keys. I've been given no hints to where they are, and nothing to tell me when I've found all the keys in a given area. I already found one by accident, and it was so well-hidden that I despair a little bit about how long it will take me to find the other eight.

Prime 1 did this as well. Not particularly pleased hearing about this since Prime 2 is still on my backlog :\

shoptroll wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

Instead, I've been sent on a quest to crawl back through the Dark World versions of each area looking for nine hidden keys. I've been given no hints to where they are, and nothing to tell me when I've found all the keys in a given area. I already found one by accident, and it was so well-hidden that I despair a little bit about how long it will take me to find the other eight.

Prime 1 did this as well. Not particularly pleased hearing about this since Prime 2 is still on my backlog :

Yup. I was a bit more prepared with Prime 2 since I thought the Chozo Artifacts in Prime 1 were optional and SURPRISE! they weren't. I haven't played Echoes in a really long time, so I cannot remember if there was any sort of hint as to their location you could look for.

I'm gonna be honest, though. When it comes to annoying stuff like that, I've come to terms with things like GameFAQs or other sources of information for help. Hell, I did it recently with Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood for all the glyph puzzle solutions. I used to feel guilty if I had to resort to that sort of thing, but now, I said "f*ck you game, I've played you for a week and have Dishonored waiting for my nimble fingers to caress its packaging. You're getting Googled".

So yeah, that's my recommendation.

...God, I can't even remember the final boss to Echoes. I KNOW I must have replayed it at least once, but I played the original Metroid Prime a lot more.

ccesarano wrote:
shoptroll wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:

Instead, I've been sent on a quest to crawl back through the Dark World versions of each area looking for nine hidden keys. I've been given no hints to where they are, and nothing to tell me when I've found all the keys in a given area. I already found one by accident, and it was so well-hidden that I despair a little bit about how long it will take me to find the other eight.

Prime 1 did this as well. Not particularly pleased hearing about this since Prime 2 is still on my backlog :

Yup. I was a bit more prepared with Prime 2 since I thought the Chozo Artifacts in Prime 1 were optional and SURPRISE! they weren't. I haven't played Echoes in a really long time, so I cannot remember if there was any sort of hint as to their location you could look for.

I'm gonna be honest, though. When it comes to annoying stuff like that, I've come to terms with things like GameFAQs or other sources of information for help. Hell, I did it recently with Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood for all the glyph puzzle solutions. I used to feel guilty if I had to resort to that sort of thing, but now, I said "f*ck you game, I've played you for a week and have Dishonored waiting for my nimble fingers to caress its packaging. You're getting Googled".

So yeah, that's my recommendation.

...God, I can't even remember the final boss to Echoes. I KNOW I must have replayed it at least once, but I played the original Metroid Prime a lot more.

I rarely bother with collectible bullcrap anymore. Unless there is some kind of in game payoff, or I am feeling especially achievement-whory, I don't bother. I sometimes wonder why that kind of padding gets put into games in the first place (and it was there before achievements, so it isn't just that). Then I remember when Clocky and were playing Fable III she mentioned she likes collectibles in games (with some caveats, perhaps? I don't remember), so there is clearly an audience for it. Personally though, it almost always feels like a waste of my time, so it needs to be optional.

Oddly, though, I don't remember any of that bothering my when I played the Metroid Primes. It has been a while (I actually played all three when they released), so maybe I've just forgotten. Plus Metroid is one of my favorite series of all time, so maybe I was more tolerant of a bit of crap mucking up all the Awesome.

The specific example of Glyph puzzles in AC:Brotherhood was really disappointing. Finding them in the first place was a pain because they didn't look like they did in AC2, so I was looking for the wrong thing until I looked it up. The puzzles themselves were the same handful of garbage "read the designers mind", or spin a thing puzzles, and the payoff video at the end was a let down. I don't remember whether the puzzles themselves in AC2 were any better, but I felt like the video was a worthwhile payoff in that one.

ccesarano wrote:

I haven't played Echoes in a really long time, so I cannot remember if there was any sort of hint as to their location you could look for.

The only hint is that there are parts of the map you're unlikely to have explored at this point. That last weapon is the one that lets you shoot light and dark energy at the same time, and that's required to unlock some doors.

I'm gonna be honest, though. When it comes to annoying stuff like that, I've come to terms with things like GameFAQs or other sources of information for help.

I'm going to run through the areas I haven't explored to see what I turn up, and if I'm missing any keys at that point I'll look them up. I don't have a problem with looking stuff up on GameFAQs, but I enjoy the exploration element of Metroid games enough to give it a shot on my own first.

Garden Ninja wrote:

Then I remember when Clocky and were playing Fable III she mentioned she likes collectibles in games (with some caveats, perhaps? I don't remember), so there is clearly an audience for it. Personally though, it almost always feels like a waste of my time, so it needs to be optional.

I like collectibles that have an in-game payoff. Things like missile expansions or heart pieces give me a tangible reward for collecting them; likewise Star Coins and such that add an additional degree of challenge to a level are nice. Things like feathers and flags that are there just for the sake of being picked up are a nuisance, and I generally don't bother with them unless I really enjoy the game I'm playing (as was the case with Fable III).

What bothered me in Metroid Prime 2 wasn't that I had to go find nine more doodads. It was that I wasn't expecting to have to go find nine more doodads and was instead expecting to have the door to the last boss fight opened up. I'd forgotten that Metroid Prime had the hunt for the Chozo Artifacts at the end, so I wasn't expecting anything like that in Metroid Prime 2. It just killed all the momentum I had built up.

Garden Ninja wrote:

I sometimes wonder why that kind of padding gets put into games in the first place (and it was there before achievements, so it isn't just that). Then I remember when Clocky and were playing Fable III she mentioned she likes collectibles in games (with some caveats, perhaps? I don't remember), so there is clearly an audience for it. Personally though, it almost always feels like a waste of my time, so it needs to be optional.

People just like to collect things. Some people it's trading cards, some it's random crap in video games that never amounts to anything other than a "I found it all, now I'm done." Sometimes you can see you did so much already and figure its only a bit more so you might as well get it all. At some point you toss rational thought and behavior out the window in favor of just getting it done to say it's done. I may have done that with Prototype.

Momentum. That silly narrative thing that makes the end of a game worthwhile, and yet designers seem to have little sense for it. I had that with Darksiders 2, which is probably why I spent so much time thinking "when is it going to end?". Part of it was my fault, truth told. I finished off Act 1, but it had this narrative spike in rising action that had me psyched for what was next.

And then it was just a slog through errands. While the remaining acts are better, it ruined things for me. The same kind of happened with Prime, where I thought I was about to beat the game, all excited, and then POOF! nope. You gotta collect more stuff.

That's why collectables are better left optional. The Feathers in AC2 yielded a cape and a small story point. The Feathers in AC2:Brotherhood on the other hand yielded nothing.

As for why it is put into games, think about all the people bitching about how short games are. I've heard people complain that 12 hour games are short. I say screw that. A game shouldn't overstay its welcome.

ccesarano wrote:

While the remaining acts are better, it ruined things for me. The same kind of happened with Prime, where I thought I was about to beat the game, all excited, and then POOF! nope. You gotta collect more stuff.

The Level 11 quest in Kingdom of Loathing is a great parody / lampshade of this trope.