Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D (No Spoilers Beyond What's Aired)

So the big question is how this fits into Marvel's strategy for the entire franchise?

Hey, who has the Spiderman television rights?

Been there, seen that.

I remember thinking that show stunk even as a little kid. It looks like they just picked up a Spider-man costume at a rental shop.

Running Man wrote:

I remember thinking that show stunk even as a little kid. It looks like they just picked up a Spider-man costume at a rental shop.

To be fair, that's kinda what Peter Parker did in the comics.

Should have given him a mecha... just because.

I look at the first season, not just the pilot, of a show as foundation. It's setting up the potential over the long-term and I think Shield did well to establish itself. It's the opening moves in a rich universe of possiblities, some of which appear to brand controlled by a Marvel database. Very disappointing to read that but it is what it is. Contracts expire so maybe more of that universe will be able to be included as the overall Marvel timelime moves forward.

Also, I don't know why this clicked in my head but I could kinda see this cast taking part in the Civil War storyline in a later season. Kind of like how the Dominion War shook up DS9.

Gaald wrote:

Then what the heck was she doing in that training montage, because she was throwing wrist breaking punches against that heavy bag.

Not to derail, but I'm pretty sure The Slayer can handle it...

LockAndLoad wrote:

Also, I don't know why this clicked in my head but I could kinda see this cast taking part in the Civil War storyline in a later season. Kind of like how the Dominion War shook up DS9.

Somewhere Joss said that would never happen even though he really wants it to. X-Men and Spiderman won't ever make appearances due to legal issues.

So, episode 2... thoughts?

Maybe a touch better, but still nothing special. For a show set in the Marvel Universe, they've done a horrible job actually making it feel like it is.

Thus far it's on the "good but not great" territory. I did, however, enjoy the final scene.

Spoiler:

Was not expecting a Nick Fury cameo, and it brought a smile to my face.

Attempts at giving Coulson some history, but it felt a bit weird and too easy a mine to...mine. I'm getting attached to Fitz and Simmons, but sometimes it's really tough to comprehend them behind those accents.

A slight improvement. I watch with a group of friends and we all looked around at each other after it ended going "I'm sorry guys, but this isn't very good" and then laughed since we all thought it.

I thought it was fun and that's what this should be. Hell, Buffy didn't win any Emmys but it was fun as hell. Pun intended.

I'm still digging it, but my wife said she liked this show better when it was called Torchwood.

Can anyone understand what the two scientists are saying at any given time? Because as hard as I try I don't not hear English words. Their accents are strong and when they speak a mile a minute to each other or different characters, I just hear gibberish. Not "big words I don't comprehend"... Random sounds that I can't decipher.

Tkyl wrote:

Maybe a touch better, but still nothing special. For a show set in the Marvel Universe, they've done a horrible job actually making it feel like it is.

My feelings exactly. It's been "meh" for me so far.

I'll give it a few more tries to see if it picks up.

Grenn wrote:

I thought it was fun and that's what this should be. Hell, Buffy didn't win any Emmys but it was fun as hell. Pun intended.

Actually it won 2, for Makeup and Music. Nominated for 8 others, including one for writing for the 4th season episode "Hush". The one where there were 20+ minutes with no spoken dialogue.

ccesarano wrote:

Thus far it's on the "good but not great" territory. I did, however, enjoy the final scene.

Definitely.

It's still finding itself, but it's still good enough that I will continue watching it. I expect it to get better as the season progresses.

I have to admit Nick Fury at the end had me laughing and I am so tired of Samuel Jackson, he's in damn near everything. I was not expecting a cameo so soon either I wonder how many more they might have planned.

Gaald wrote:

It's still finding itself, but it's still good enough that I will continue watching it. I expect it to get better as the season progresses.

This is my take as well. There is room for growth, seeds being planted. Also, it's a very successful network show from the start, which makes it likely to get a 2nd season soon (if it doesn't have one already.) This will allow long term plot elements to be written (lore episodes) and front-load the series w/ monster-of-the-week episodes to get everyone's attention.

I thought this episode was much better than the first. Agree that the Ward character needs to be removed/improved.

Enjoyed the nod to Serenity with the stun rod.

Still pretty meh, after the second episode. They're dropping little hints about backgrounds, trying to hook interest in the characters, but so far, it's not working very well for me. If, for instance, I never understand the 'cavalry' references, my life will not be somehow incomplete. And I was just shaking my head through pretty much the entire main fight sequence: it just wouldn't work that way.

I don't think Whedon is doing the dialog. It's serviceable, but it falls rather flat on a fairly frequent basis.

Still not convinced, one way or the other, but I think I'm a little less impressed after Ep2 than I was after the pilot.

That inflatable life raft was impossibly sturdy. I liked that the team didn't even bother to duct tape it in place once the danger had passed

I don't think many of us here were surprised by Reyes' ulterior motives, knowing Whedon as we do. Episode 2 had all the trappings of the obligatory "group of opposites pulls together and learns a valuable lesson about teamwork" plot, and if anybody missed that Coulsen directly warned Reyes of it while the team was still in peril.

I'm liking the series so far, but as with most network tv shows, the writers don't think much of their audience's intelligence.

On the life raft: Ordinarily, I'm one of the first folks to hammer on stuff like that, but honestly, the plane it self is impossible, so I figure why not have impossible life rafts on the impossible jet.

On Tahiti: They had better let us know why it's so damn magical. Because serious, Tahiti is magical.

In general: The show is definitely still trying to find legs. I definitely like it well enough to keep watching it; Coulson is honestly enough by himself to ensure that. But holy crap, the writers have got to figure out how to stop telegraphing every single thing. They're killing the suspense with it.

Enjoyed the nod to Serenity with the stun rod.

I thought it was a Gambit reference. At least that was his big moment in the first Wolverine movie.

I liked it in so much as the characters I liked the least improved. The Reyes betrayal was tolerably competent but forced.

I totally lost sleep over the raft thing. I am trying to do the suspension of disbelief but my logical brain won't let it go. I still enjoyed the episode despite the flaws.

I haven't seen to much Torchwood but I understand the comparison. Still, more Torchwood isn't a bad thing.

But holy crap, the writers have got to figure out how to stop telegraphing every single thing.

This is very true. However, it isn't enough to keep me from watching. But it is enough to keep a good series from being a classic series.

It's not enough to keep me watching it either, I just really hope that they find some way to manage that impulse.

Little bit annoyed at the ending with the hacker contacting her underground buddies via a text while standing directly behind the group.
Subterfuge rating zero. They could have come up with a much cooler and subtle way for her to remain in contact with her outside group than blatantly sending a text on her smart phone while standing behind the group in the middle of a top secret military base.

That inflatable life raft was impossibly sturdy.

That was the most obvious thing, but two other things really bugged me: the plane had endless atmosphere, and kept depressurizing for several minutes, and everyone remained conscious at 40,000 feet, even to the point of being able to fight. And then, it just occurred to me now: after blowing a hole through the side, the force of the endless decompression would have peeled the side of the plane back like a tin can, and it would have crashed. It's just a thin aluminum skin, fer chrissake.

If they're prioritizing spectacle that much, already, I think it's unlikely that the show is ever going to tighten up and be great. I think standard Star Trek technobabble with "and Data saves us!" plotting is much more likely.

That is, basically, exactly what we just had: it was Skye's turn to be Data.

Heh, I knew the raft was going to be brought up time and again on here. I don't know WHO that would fool, to be honest.

It felt like an episode of Chuck to me, actually. Make of that what you will. However, Joss or not, this is mostly the same team that chose to go with no sound in space and bits of information such as needing oxygen to fire a gun in outer space. I can forgive most of Malor's gripes because, well, TV, but even for me the life raft, which not only looks thin but I'm pretty sure I saw a tear in it, is asking a bit too much to be swallowed.

Either way, still going to watch. If it is at least as good as Chuck I know I'll have fun, at least.

Malor wrote:
That inflatable life raft was impossibly sturdy.

That was the most obvious thing, but two other things really bugged me: the plane had endless atmosphere, and kept depressurizing for several minutes, and everyone remained conscious at 40,000 feet, even to the point of being able to fight. And then, it just occurred to me now: after blowing a hole through the side, the force of the endless decompression would have peeled the side of the plane back like a tin can, and it would have crashed. It's just a thin aluminum skin, fer chrissake.

If they're prioritizing spectacle that much, already, I think it's unlikely that the show is ever going to tighten up and be great. I think standard Star Trek technobabble with "and Data saves us!" plotting is much more likely.

That is, basically, exactly what we just had: it was Skye's turn to be Data.

Like I said, the plane was impossible before you even start talking about any of that. I can't even imagine how the rear two engines could possibly function with the amount of turbulence around the intakes, or how that giant-ass rear wing structure wouldn't cause massive amounts of turbulence without engines bolted on, so the fact that it's flying at all means that clearly it's a product of super advanced technology. From there, it's a tiny step to incredibly strong, nigh indestructible life rafts or HVAC that can pump tons of atmosphere, or that the plane is not skinned with aircraft grade aluminum.

Maybe I'm just used to fast conversation, but I don't have an issue hearing Fitz-Simmons babble. It is fast, and perhaps Fitz's accent is stronger than it needs to be. Overtime I'm sure people will either adjust or just ignore it all together since not everyone likes listening to techno-babble.

I'm going to keep watching because not every show is going to have it's legs in the first two episodes. And I will always watch a show with Coulson/Clark Gregg.

I didn't talk about it, but I'm rather ambivalent about them. I don't mind them being there at all, but I probably wouldn't miss them much if it was just Coulson, Ward, Skye and The Calvary.