You say Police State, I say potato. Either way let's discuss surveillance and government overreach.

eh, nevermind. That's just Jayhawker doing his thing.

BadKen wrote:

UK government has now explicitly equated journalism with terrorism.

UK: Snowden reporter's partner involved in 'espionage' and 'terrorism'

I find your slippery slope argument unconvincing. Our government would never redefine terrorism to "anyone who opposes us, or even just embarrasses us".

Oh wait.

Time for a blast from the past... At least I really hope all of that behavior has really stopped.

Yonder wrote:

I really hope all of that behavior has really stopped.

Haaaaha ha ha! Stopped? Oh you're just so precious!

Techdirt's writeup on that latest UK insanity is worth reading.

The UK government's argument that Miranda is a terrorist:

Intelligence indicates that Miranda is likely to be involved in espionage activity which has the potential to act against the interests of UK national security," according to the document.

"We assess that Miranda is knowingly carrying material the release of which would endanger people's lives," the document continued. "Additionally the disclosure, or threat of disclosure, is designed to influence a government and is made for the purpose of promoting a political or ideological cause. This therefore falls within the definition of terrorism..."

Techdirt's take (their boldface):

Read that again and let it sink in. UK officials are arguing that if you have any material which, if disclosed, might "influence a government," you are, by definition, a terrorist.

Yep, carrying information that might influence the government is terrorism, and totally justifies whatever treatment they decide to dish out to the enemy of the state.

In OrwellReality, whistleblowers are terrorists.

The UK has always had an overbearing approach to it's intelligence; their Official Secrets Act is pretty draconian and has been around for a long time. As I've noted before, they are further along the path than the US, in large part due to that kind of legislation and approach to security.

Three Leaks, Three Weeks, and What We've Learned About the US Government's Other Spying Authority: Executive Order 12333 [EFF]

A Washington Post article reveals that the National Security Agency has been siphoning off data from the links between Yahoo and Google data centers, which include the fiber optic connections between company servers at various points around the world. While the user may have an encrypted connection to the website, the internal data flows were not encrypted and allowed the NSA to obtain millions of records each month, including both metadata and content like audio, video and text. This is not part of the PRISM collection under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act or the business records program under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, but a separate program called MUSCULAR under what appears to be Executive Order 12333 ("12333").

In a bit of irony re: Glenn Greenwald's choice of home nation -
Brazil Admits It Spied On U.S. Diplomats

Maybe we should all turn our computers into spam bots and see if the NSA has a buffer overflow bug.

So, after the revelations that the NSA is tapping directly into the Google and Yahoo data centers without their (apparent) permission or even knowledge, the NSA of course denied everything, but in that usual weasel-speak method where they don't deny what they're actually doing, instead denying things that they don't do, but trying to word it so that you think they're saying something they actually aren't. (One of their favorites is "we don't do X under this program" -- because they do X under a different program.)

The Washington Post follows up here with some analysis of the weasel denials, and additional evidence that, yes, the government has definitely intruded directly into Google and Yahoo's internal networks.

PRISM is just the cover story. The real story is unlimited, total snooping, all the time. Then they use PRISM to pretend like they had court justification to search you.

We showed some of the NSA’s briefing slides to private sector experts with detailed knowledge of the internal corporate networks of each company. In separate conversations, they agreed that the slides included samples of data structures and formats that never travel unencrypted on the public Internet.

Again, it is no coincidence that Spitzer's phones were tapped. Everyone's phones are tapped. But Spitzer was going after the banks, so the security state destroyed him.

Lavabit has a Kickstarter up to clean up and release the source code for it's backend.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...

Kevin Gosztola at Firedoglake has some interesting observations on the Miranda thing: In David Miranda’s Case, UK Security Services Argue Traveling with Secret Documents Is ‘Terrorism’

With this authoritarian logic, Miranda’s case has become an example of how a state can repress journalism by deciding that a journalist or media organization has political or ideological motives and, therefore, does not have a right to report on certain material the state does not want the public to debate and discuss, such as the contents of documents from UK’s spy agency, GCHQ. It shows that labels can matter and, if the state can convince a public that a journalist is really an activist, that can be useful in controlling information.

So if the state says you have an opinion, then it's terrorism, not journalism.

Just some reading if anyone is curious.

“NSA Chief Keith Alexander Slams Reporters,” Nov. 1, 2013:

“Leahy and Sensenbrenner Join to Introduce USA Freedom Act,” Oct. 29, 2013: www.leahy.senate.gov/press/leahy-and...

"The Obama Administration and the Press,” Committee to Protect Journalists, Oct. 1, 2013: http://cpj.org/reports/2013/10/obama...

plavonica wrote:

More policing shenanigans.

Not just the police there. The doctors acted illegally too. Hopefully they will loose their licenses.

plavonica wrote:

shenanigans

What a nightmare that must have been.

Malor wrote:
plavonica wrote:

shenanigans

What a nightmare that must have been.

That's literally torture and violation. If true, they should all be behind bars.

And I hope the guy ends up *owning* the city of Deming when the lawsuit is over.

DSGamer wrote:
Malor wrote:
plavonica wrote:

shenanigans

What a nightmare that must have been.

That's literally torture and violation. If true, they should all be behind bars.

I'm with DSGamer here. It's way, way, way beyond shenanigans and closer to war atrocity.

This is actually getting some attention, and both conservatives and liberals are - justifiably - enraged.

The kicker? That hospital billed him for those procedures and is now threatening to send him to collections.

Seth wrote:

This is actually getting some attention, and both conservatives and liberals are - justifiably - enraged.

The kicker? That hospital billed him for those procedures and is now threatening to send him to collections.

Wow, that's an amazingly messed up situation to begin with, and for them to have the gall to make him pay for it? WTF. I hope the ACLU takes those clowns to the cleaners.

Honestly I think the doctors and police involved should see jail time. The hospital should be placed under immediate federal review for performing a procedure against the patients will and have it's records ripped apart top to bottom, the police chief should be fired for cause and every officer should be required to attend mandatory re-training.
And then the victim should own about 50% of the hospital and the town.

Seth wrote:

The kicker? That hospital billed him for those procedures and is now threatening to send him to collections.

Wow, talk about sending your family a bill for the bullet.

The story gets more complicated:

Woof![/url]]
Our investigation reveals another chapter. Another man, another minor traffic violation, another incident with Leo the K-9 and another example of the violation of a man's body.

Police reports state deputies stopped Timothy Young because he turned without putting his blinker on.

Again, Leo the K-9 alerts on Young's seat.

Young is taken to the Gila Regional Medical Center in Silver City, and just like Eckert, he's subjected to medical procedures including x-rays of his stomach and an anal exam.

Again, police found nothing, and again the procedures were done without consent, and in a county not covered by the search warrant.

We've learned more about that drug dog, Leo, that seems to get it wrong pretty often. He might be getting it wrong because he's not even certified in New Mexico.

If you take a look at the dog's certification, the dog did get trained. But his certification to be a drug dog expired in April 2011. K-9s need yearly re-certification courses, and Leo is falling behind.

realityhack wrote:

Honestly I think the doctors and police involved should see jail time.

Absolutely they should. They won't, in fact many of them probably won't even get fired, but they should.

Not that I was ever going to go to New Mexico, but that kind of seals the deal.

As an FYI, K-9 units are VERY good at interpreting subtle cues from their owners to create an alarm, and pretty universally terrible at actually finding drugs.

They're mobile probable cause units and little else.

In Nevada, the drugs dogs are deliberately trained to alert when the officers tell them to.

Malor wrote:

In Nevada, the drugs dogs are deliberately trained to alert when the officers tell them to.

I don't doubt it; there are stories in MI of similar training. German shepherds and other dogs are extremely observant and *extremely* smart; even a blink or a shifty look from their owner can be trained as a command to bark/scratch/alert people to a spot and poof! Probable cause to destroy property.

Googlers tell the NSA to f*ck off.

https://plus.google.com/108799184931...
https://plus.google.com/+MikeHearn/p...

Our most paranoid friends were right. Grist

We now know just how much of what happens on or near the internet is being catalogued by our government (basically, everything). Environmental activists have a history of drawing the attention of the surveillance-minded, especially if they are working in landscapes — forests, tar sands — that are financially valuable to someone.

I’ve been asking people to connect these dots. Some of the most interesting answers came from Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT and co-founder of the international news blog Global Voices. As someone who works with activists around the world, Zuckerman has a unique take on the social and technological aspects of living under surveillance. He talked with me recently about how changes in the technological landscape have forced changes in privacy strategies.