GWJ Film of the Week

ClockworkHouse wrote:
Heavenly Creatures is really good.

Brain Dead/Dead Alive is one of the best movies of the Stuart Gordon school of funny/icky body horror.

Another one I've been meaning to watch! Thanks for giving me a reason, Tuffalo. You da man.

Haha! 2 winners in a row.

Tanglebones wrote:

Brain Dead/Dead Alive is one of the best movies of the Stuart Gordon school of funny/icky body horror.

One of my all time favourite horror movies, and my favourite Peter Jackson movie. Great recommendation.

My movie recommendation is 'The Proposition' 104min, set in Australia in the late 19th century "A lawman apprehends a notorious outlaw and gives him nine days to kill his older brother, or else they'll execute his younger brother."
Written by musician Nick Cave, its bleak and beautifully shot and acted in the same sense that the Australian outback is bleak and beautiful.

troubleshot wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:

Brain Dead/Dead Alive is one of the best movies of the Stuart Gordon school of funny/icky body horror.

One of my all time favourite horror movies, and my favourite Peter Jackson movie. Great recommendation.

My movie recommendation is 'The Proposition' 104min, set in Australia in the late 19th century "A lawman apprehends a notorious outlaw and gives him nine days to kill his older brother, or else they'll execute his younger brother."
Written by musician Nick Cave, its bleak and beautifully shot and acted in the same sense that the Australian outback is bleak and beautiful.

Ooh, I've been meaning to watch that for a while. Hopefully it's on one of the US streaming services.

Tanglebones wrote:
Hopefully it's on one of the US streaming services.

It's on Amazon Instant Video, but it isn't part of Prime. This is the first I've heard of it, but I'll have to give it a watch. I'm a fan of Nick Cave's novels.

ClockworkHouse wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:
Hopefully it's on one of the US streaming services.

It's on Amazon Instant Video, but it isn't part of Prime. This is the first I've heard of it, but I'll have to give it a watch. I'm a fan of Nick Cave's novels.

He had a good interview on Marc Maron's podcast a while back where he (in part) talked about the process of making it:
http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episod...

Tanglebones wrote:
ClockworkHouse wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:
Hopefully it's on one of the US streaming services.

It's on Amazon Instant Video, but it isn't part of Prime. This is the first I've heard of it, but I'll have to give it a watch. I'm a fan of Nick Cave's novels.

He had a good interview on Marc Maron's podcast a while back where he (in part) talked about the process of making it:
http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episod...

Since it isn't on Netflix or Hulu, and I've seen it (love it), that one probably won't make it as film of the week anytime soon.

Watched The Frighteners last night, and it was fun! You could definitely see the Peter Jackson directing style. There were a couple of those swooping zoom in close up shots.

Whoops. Forgot to put up a movie yesterday.

[size=30]GWJ Film of the Week #16[/size]

[size=20]Tokyo Story[/size]

IMAGE(http://img2.imagesbn.com/p/715515110211_p0_v2_s260x420.JPG)

Release Year: 1953
Director: Yasujiro Ozu
Writers: Kogo Noda, Yasujiro Ozu
Notable Actors: Chishû Ryû, Chieko Higashiyama, Sô Yamamura
Synopsis (Criterion): A profoundly stirring evocation of elemental humanity and universal heartbreak, Tokyo Story is the crowning achievement of the unparalleled Yasujiro Ozu. The film, which follows an aging couple’s journey to visit their grown children in bustling postwar Tokyo, surveys the rich and complex world of family life with the director’s customary delicacy and incisive perspective on social mores. Featuring lovely performances from Ozu regulars Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara, Tokyo Story plumbs and deepens the director’s recurring theme of generational conflict, creating what is without question one of cinema’s mightiest masterpieces.

I love the Yasujiro Ozu movies I've seen but haven't seen this. It's available to watch on Hulu.

I've got a good idea for next week too.

I watched Tokyo Story this morning. It's a very thoughtful movie. At times it's sad and others it's happy. It's very beautifully shot. I don't think it's too high up there on my list of the best classic Japanese film, but it definitely has its moments, and there are many strong and interesting themes throughout.

[size=30]GWJ Film of the Week #17[/size]

[size=20]Scenes from a Marriage[/size]

IMAGE(http://s3.amazonaws.com/criterion-production/release_boxshots/3346-0d86a2abf07709e8f5d938d82f934f51/scenes_cover_newbranding_348x490_original.jpg)

Release Year: 1973
Director: Ingmar Bergman
Writer: Ingmar Bergman
Notable Actors: Liv Ullmann, Erland Josephson, Bibi Andersson
Synopsis (Criterion): Scenes from a Marriage chronicles the many years of love and turmoil that bind Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson) through matrimony, infidelity, divorce, and subsequent partners. Shot in intense, intimate close-ups by master cinematographer Sven Nykvist and featuring flawless performances, Ingmar Bergman’s emotional x-ray reveals the intense joys and pains of a complex relationship. The Criterion Collection is proud to present both the three-hour U.S. theatrical cut of Scenes from a Marriage and Bergman’s original five-hour, six-part television version.

I love Bergman films but still haven't watched this. Like Fanny and Alexander, this is a long one. I think I watched the television cut for that one. Going to stick with the theatrical version on this one and probably split it up over several nights. It's available to watch on Hulu.

I watched the first part of Tokyo Story last night. I'll watch the rest tonight or tomorrow night. I was really impressed by the delicate, subtle ways that the relationships between the characters are established and articulated, both in the dialogue and in the actors' performances. It's interesting the ways that these visiting parents can be so disruptive of their children's lives despite being so pleasant and agreeable.

I was struck by a few aspects of the editing and cinematography. The first was the extensive use of still shots to create emptiness between scenes, and even within the scenes themselves. If I remember correctly, it's a technique that Ozu pioneered but has become very common in Japanese film making; I know those sorts of quiet, mood-setting shots are used pretty extensively in anime.

Ozu has a few interesting ones in Tokyo Story. Not only do you get the kinds of shots a modern viewer might come to expect—like a few brief shots of a child's study desk, the street in front of the house, or someone standing along a waterfront—but there are also these kinds of shots in the middle of scenes, as when everyone leaves a room and the camera lingers behind them in the now quiet and empty room for just a few moments. It creates an interesting awareness of the spaces in which this drama is unfolding that you don't normally get in movies.

The second thing that stuck me about the cinematography is how stilted the staging frequently was. Rather than going with the much more common naturalistic technique of filming people in such a way that the camera seems to be observing a scene from outside it, Ozu stages his actors in a way that's frequently deliberately unnatural. Characters will sit in a room so that they're talking but all facing away from one another, or speaking aloud dialogue that's unheard by people who would seem to be right next to them.

Also interesting was the frequent use of direct address by the actors. It isn't often that you see actors look directly into the camera when speaking, and you certainly don't often see this used by multiple characters talking to one another in the same scene. Film classes typically advise you against using that shot because it can become disorienting for the viewer: they tend to lose track of where characters are in relation to one another, and it can give the feeling that characters are talking to themselves rather than talking to anyone else.

Both of those things—unnatural staging and direct address—create a disconnected feeling to the characters interactions, making each person seem as though they're alone within themselves even while surrounded by others, which feels in some ways like the intent of the film as a whole. It's interesting how certain characters are paired up, such as the grandmother and grandfather, so that they're always facing the same direction and filmed addressing one another, but when addressing others outside of that pairing the staging tends to break a bit to illustrate their isolation.

Really, just a beautifully crafted movie. I'm looking forward to finishing it.

I had no idea this was going on. I'm going to have to jump on it since I am on a movie kick. This weekend I watched a bunch of movies I hadn't seen before that are considered classics. Gross Point Blank and Casino along with non classics like Mud, Despicable Me 1 & 2, and How to Train Your Dragon.

Edwin wrote:
I had no idea this was going on. I'm going to have to jump on it since I am on a movie kick. This weekend I watched a bunch of movies I hadn't seen before that are considered classics. Gross Point Blank and Casino along with non classics like Mud, Despicable Me 1 & 2, and How to Train Your Dragon.

Well, you now have 17 movies to pick from. I'm generally looking for "guest" picks as well. After this week's movie, I think I'll try to find something more light-hearted on Netflix to switch things up.

You have to pick Miami Connection if you haven't already.

Love the highest rated review on Netflix:

This movie makes "The Godfather" look like a second rate community college dinner theatre production. You must watch this film.

You could use that for pretty much any B-movie.

Gross Point Blank is an all time make me smile movie. It doesn't hurt that it came out just in time for our 10 year reunion.

Edit: plus any movie that has The Pogues on their soundtrack is good in my book

Gah, I haven't been able to watch any of these, partially because I like watching movies with friends but my roommates aren't into the sort of stuff being chosen. They just do the usual Hollywood stuff with the occasional well-done film (and even then, only as far as, say, The Social Network (which, oddly enough, convinced my friend to finally join Facebook somehow).

I doubt I'll be able to manage this latest film. Three hours is a long time. I'll see if I can look at some of my unwatched DVDs in my own collection, though. It is hardly high-art, but I know I've been looking for an excuse to finally see The Terminator (first one), and it's in my unopened Terminator Anthology box set.

ccesarano wrote:
(and even then, only as far as, say, The Social Network (which, oddly enough, convinced my friend to finally join Facebook somehow).

Yeah, definitely switching to something light and fun next week. Miami Connection might work, and I might as well just tack on Rad to make it a double feature.

I'd love to watch along, but the film selections are a bit highbrow for me. Also something that's only available online on Hulu Plus is a big minus for me. I'm not going to pay Hulu a monthly fee so that I can watch content with ads.

We could have a high brow film thread and a Pulitzer film thread.

I meant "populist" but my phone coughed up Pulitzer. Thanks, Google.

BadKen wrote:
I'd love to watch along, but the film selections are a bit highbrow for me. Also something that's only available online on Hulu Plus is a big minus for me. I'm not going to pay Hulu a monthly fee so that I can watch content with ads.

There aren't any ads or watermarks with the Criterion content. I think it's limited to 720p, but I'm not sure. If you're into Criterion Collection stuff, the subscription is a steal. But yeah, I definitely try and switch things back and forth between Netflix and Hulu. The last 2 weeks ended up being Hulu and more highbrow. Next week will be Netflix and a fun movie.

Nice thoughts, Clockwork! I agree with the staging of the actors. It feels a lot like a play to me which I liked. Hope you enjoy the rest of it.

I still haven't watched any of Scenes from a Marriage but plan on watching the first half tonight. I have the perfect movie in mind for next week.

I watched the first hour of Scenes from a Marriage. It is brilliant and interesting, but holy cow is it true to real-life relationships which is pretty freaking depressing to me. Gonna definitely split it up into 3 1-hour chunks.

Finished it. It's rather depressing and bittersweet but very true to life and human relationships. Favorite line from the movie towards the end: "We love each other in an earthly and imperfect way."

Tomorrow I'll post a much less serious movie for the week.

[size=30]GWJ Film of the Week #18[/size]

[size=20]Minecraft: The Story of Mojang[/size]

Release Year: 2013
Director: Paul Owens
Writer: Ingmar Bergman
Notable Actors: Jens Bergensten, Jonathan Blow, Lewis Brindley
Synopsis (IMDB): The first year in the life of independent game studio "Mojang" following the landmark success of their debut title, "Minecraft."

Documentary time! I love what 2 Player Productions has done with the Double Fine Adventure documentary. I'm really looking forward to watching this.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

[size=30]GWJ Film of the Week #18[/size]

[size=20]Minecraft: The Story of Mojang[/size]

Release Year: 2013
Director: Paul Owens
Writer: Ingmar Bergman
Notable Actors: Jens Bergensten, Jonathan Blow, Lewis Brindley
Synopsis (IMDB): The first year in the life of independent game studio "Mojang" following the landmark success of their debut title, "Minecraft."

Documentary time! I love what 2 Player Productions has done with the Double Fine Adventure documentary. I'm really looking forward to watching this.

Impressive writing talent for a silly little documentary.

I think I'll just let that one stay the way it is because it's rather funny.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
:) I think I'll just let that one stay the way it is because it's rather funny.

IMAGE(http://www.morethings.com/fan/seventh_seal/seventh-seal-361.jpg)