Detroit files for bankruptcy--largest filing in US history

skeletonframes wrote:
Vector wrote:
CptDomano wrote:

To be fair, though--there is plenty of truthful things to bash Detroit over aside from the Red Wings stadium. :D

Yeah, Joe Louis Arena is a dump!

Yes, a dump. A stale-smelling, congested, stupid dangerous concrete stairway, bathrooms-with-troughs dump. But, it's a beautiful dump. A rafters-full-of-banners dump.

Here's a good rundown of how the new arena will be funded. http://kuklaskorner.com/tmr/comments...

And, as an employee of a Detroit utility company, I would really really not like a large corporation to take over the city. Not only will we get Enforcement droids that sound like pigs when they fall down stairs, but my job will probably be given to the first dudes who aren't afraid to go into a hole in the ground and be surrounded by electricity for $7/hr.

I'd like to see Joe Louis turned in to a museum.

Vector wrote:
skeletonframes wrote:
Vector wrote:
CptDomano wrote:

To be fair, though--there is plenty of truthful things to bash Detroit over aside from the Red Wings stadium. :D

Yeah, Joe Louis Arena is a dump!

Yes, a dump. A stale-smelling, congested, stupid dangerous concrete stairway, bathrooms-with-troughs dump. But, it's a beautiful dump. A rafters-full-of-banners dump.

Here's a good rundown of how the new arena will be funded. http://kuklaskorner.com/tmr/comments...

And, as an employee of a Detroit utility company, I would really really not like a large corporation to take over the city. Not only will we get Enforcement droids that sound like pigs when they fall down stairs, but my job will probably be given to the first dudes who aren't afraid to go into a hole in the ground and be surrounded by electricity for $7/hr.

I'd like to see Joe Louis turned in to a museum.

You could do what we did in Toronto and turn it into a grocery store. ;P

Except that there aren't any grocery stores left within the Detroit city limits.

I smell opportunity then!

There's Aldi, Spartan, Whole Foods, and Save-a-Lot within the City Limits.

Is a place called Spartan really where you would want to shop for food?

NathanialG wrote:

Is a place called Spartan really where you would want to shop for food?

You probably have to battle and kill the food to take it home.

haha, Spartan stores is a major, multi state grocery chain headquarted in my home town. Kind of like Giant Eagle in PA.

Yeah, but the city stretches about 800 square miles, and many-most people in the city have to drive upwards of 40 minutes to get things like fresh produce, or meat. And that is for the people with a car.
And Whole Foods is not catering to the working poor in the city.

We had a simple rule of 10 at the public defender. If it is more than a 10 minute bus ride, people will not do that-things like drug rehab, hospitals, shopping, libraries, etc.

There is "a" Meijer being built. I like the numerous communities undertaking gardening projects. There is one neighborhood harvesting some 50 acres of vegetables this year just from the soil between the street and sidewalk.

KingGorilla wrote:

Yeah, but the city stretches about 800 square miles, and many-most people in the city have to drive upwards of 40 minutes to get things like fresh produce, or meat. And that is for the people with a car.
And Whole Foods is not catering to the working poor in the city.

We had a simple rule of 10 at the public defender. If it is more than a 10 minute bus ride, people will not do that-things like drug rehab, hospitals, shopping, libraries, etc.

There is "a" Meijer being built. I like the numerous communities undertaking gardening projects. There is one neighborhood harvesting some 50 acres of vegetables this year just from the soil between the street and sidewalk.

Agree with everything I didn't bold. While I think the cries of "food desert" are a bit overreaching, I absolutely believe that a huge portion of Detroit communities are vastly underserved in terms of fresh produce/grocery, even as we see some pretty bright glimmers of hope, as you point out.

Regarding the bolded section -- I'd never heard that but it makes sense. That probably explains why it's so hard for urbanists in my city to sell mass transit; Grand Rapids would need to function under a "rule of 45" to even get close.

It is so aggravating that the only bold move our government has the will for is to sew women's vaginas shut.

Can't we at least lease it in perpetuity as Israel overflow space? As long as they allow free access to the new hockey mosque, of course.

KingGorilla wrote:

Yeah, but the city stretches about 800 square miles, and many-most people in the city have to drive upwards of 40 minutes to get things like fresh produce, or meat. And that is for the people with a car.
And Whole Foods is not catering to the working poor in the city.

Huh. Glad my observation of that wasn't crazy. My wife and I visited a couple of years ago for a wedding and we were looking for a decent place to eat. It may have been the area we were in but we drove miles before seeing a restaurant that was decent.

Living in the burbs, my wife and I will do a 30 minute drive to the produce market, go to the next town over for meat. Our grocery routine is a half day process. That is also why we tend to bulk up on meat-I just got the flier from the nearby Halal market, I am picking up more chicken and ground beef. Our weekly groceries are about 60 bucks when we do this, if we do not go to the Produce Market in Westland or Dearborn, that gets closer to 150. And I am lucky, to live so close to a year round farmer's style produce market. My dad will drive out to the farms, 40-50 minutes-great in the summer on a motorcycle, but a pain the rest of the year.

For quick trips, like we ran out of milk and such, we are lucky to live near a Save A Lot, a Wal-Mart, a Kroger, and a Hiller's(local Chain).

Detroit is not the only "food desert" but it is exacerbated by the lack of cars among many in the cities and our worst in the nation public transit. You either pay out the nose to go to even a "discount" store like Wal-Mart or you drive around to get the better deals. It was a similar ritual when I was in Milwaukee without a car-one bus ride to Pic N Save, another to Whole Foods for some Produce. If I did both at Pic N Save I spent the same total, but on inferior Produce that spoiled quickly, or I would spend even more by getting frozen and canned veg, instead.

But the location of stores is only a sliver of the problem. You also have generations upon generations of people who do not know how to cook or eat healthy; likely lack a lot of the time to do so working 2 jobs at minimum wage. Getting back on the topic of African Americans, they consume 2-3 times more friend foods at home, 2-3 times more fast food, 2-3 times more highly processed foods (stuff like frozen chicken nuggets, TV dinners).

Seth wrote:

That money comes from the state, not the city. I'm not a fan of using government funds to pay for sports stadiums for any reason, but it's not "Detroit" that's able to come up with the funds.

The article is very clear that the money is coming entirely from the city and the Red Wings owner.

The Michigan Strategic Fund Board approved the Detroit Downtown Development Authority's request to use economic development taxes for the project. The board also took a preliminary step toward issuing $450 million in bonds to build the arena, to be paid off in no more than 30 years by the Red Wings' owner and the city.
No new taxes or funds from the cash-strapped city would be needed.
Senate Democratic leader Gretchen Whitmer, an East Lansing Democrat, opposed the measure as a drain on funding for Detroit's public schools.

Emphases are mine. This is a direct handout of city tax dollars to corporate cronies, as all research indicates that stadiums (or arenas, or whatever) are at the very best a wash for city economies and at worst a huge drain. And even if it was a plus, it's entirely unconscionable to spend tax dollars on sports when the city cannot provide basic services.

Even as the city is going bankrupt, they are continuing the exact policies and actions that created the current situation.

Aetius wrote:

Even as the city is going bankrupt, they are continuing the exact policies and actions that created the current situation.

Spending on sports had nothing to do with creating the current situation. Diverting that funding to the schools wouldn't do much to help.

The average Detroit public high school student missed at least 28 days of school in 2011.
Half of Detroit is functionally illiterate.
Over half of Detroit's property owners don't bother to pay their property taxes.

IMAGE(http://i39.tinypic.com/29q03ra.jpg)

Came across this mural as I was walking back to my truck from a meeting with a judge on Thursday.

It spanned the entire alley with Black Panther, Spiderman, Captain America, but this part was my favorite,

Cool street art. What street was that, KG?

That was Congress between Brush and Beaubian, that wall was actually the Western wall of St. Andrews.

Some more photos of the wall and the opposite wall. It really is an amazing work. And apparently, I am quite late to the party because that mural is over a year old.

Filed under "We joked about this for years but it actually happened", Detroit lost $1 Million check in a desk drawer for a month.

On the flip side, it looks like if you're in public sector IT around Detroit you have some guaranteed work ahead of you.

cheeba wrote:
Aetius wrote:

Even as the city is going bankrupt, they are continuing the exact policies and actions that created the current situation.

Spending on sports had nothing to do with creating the current situation.

Actually, it has. And those boondoggles are just a few examples of the city government's unshakable support for large, expensive, crony-benefiting projects.

Diverting that funding to the schools wouldn't do much to help.

Of course not. The problem with the Detroit school system is not one of funding, but rather a sclerotic, dysfunctional, crony-ridden, monopoly bureaucracy. There's pretty much only one fix for that at this point - shut it down.

Over half of Detroit's property owners don't bother to pay their property taxes.

Why should they? Even if you believe in the "social contract", the city has reneged on their end of the bargain.