Gamers Without Jobs: The resume thread

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I searched through twelve pages of search results before giving up and re-creating the old resume help thread we had a few years ago. This is your chance to help others and get help with a resume. Tips, tricks, critiques, anything can and will be useful for someone here. So no matter how crazy your thought us, please post it anyways.

So I've been having troubles refining my resume for general use on linkedin, Monster, Hot Jobs, etc. I was hoping for some advice on what I can do to straighten it out so I am not totally embarrassed by it.

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dhsv8...

Edwin wrote:
So I've been having troubles refining my resume for general use on linkedin, Monster, Hot Jobs, etc. I was hoping for some advice on what I can do to straighten it out so I am not totally embarrassed by it.

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dhsv8...

I few thoughts. I prefer to have the education first. It makes more sense chronologically and it can get lost at the bottom. You might also want to included a section on skills and include fluent in the languages and then add one or two more, then get to professional experience.

There are way too many bullet points for your work experience. These hiring directors likely get many resumes and don't want to read all that. I would keep it to 4 or 5 bullet points highlighting the most important things. You can modify which are highlights depending on what is required for the job you are applying for. The rest can be brought up in an interview. Also I would add a descriptor to the heading, like "Professional Experience"

I like to see the most relevant stuff first, so in general I think jobs in reverse chronological order then education in reverse order works well. I also have some more general "skills, interests & achievements" information that I put above all of that to cover open source projects I've worked on, etc. And I agree with Mogg about the bullet points. Keep it short and sweet. If the interviewer wants details the can always ask for them. Some people seem to like having an "objective" section as well, in fact I have one on mine, but I think they're a bit pointless since the statement is always very generic.

IUMogg wrote:
I prefer to have the education first. It makes more sense chronologically and it can get lost at the bottom. You might also want to included a section on skills and include fluent in the languages and then add one or two more, then get to professional experience.

I have to disagree with this. Once you start reaching the "experienced professional" level, your education becomes increasingly less important compared to your job experience, unless you're just out of school.

I do agree with the skills section. And for each of your jobs, list a significant accomplishment. It'll help you standout and show why they should hire you.

Here's the format I've used successfully for a while now:

Skills
For a technical job, list all relevant technical skills (I'd include spanish fluency here). I lead with this because the first screener is probably looking for the skill matches (or buzzwords). They're pressed for time, and you may get tossed without a serious look if you make them hunt for it.

Education
I only put it here because for me it's brief and it feels more awkward at the end

Then, repeating for as many positions as it takes to fill a single page:

Companyname Jobtitle
Dates

Sentence or two summary of position

Responsibilities:
* Bulleted list
* Of 2-5 key responsibilities / achievements
* from this position

Even if you choose another format, I'd strongly recommend changing the description for each position to be about you, not the company. Your previous employer isn't the one looking for work.

Many fewer bullet points with smaller points there is a good idea.

I would also suggest at least three sections, "Education," "Experience," and "Skills." Perhaps in that order, unless you want to put experience first if you've been out of school a bit. For education, I think you only need to put your graduation date (unless you didn't graduate) and I'd also list any awards there too if you have them, such as Dean's List or honors.

With the skills section, I would recommend sub sections like this,

SKILLS

Computer Software: Tigerpaw CRM, ... SBS 2003 Server, Microsoft Office Applications

Programming Languages: SIMPL (Certified), ...

Foreign Languages: Spanish

This skills section will also replace many of the things you have under experience.

I agree on the fewer bullet points; really highlight the experiences/projects that you think are critical.

It makes perfect sense to provide a unique resume to different potential employers (i.e. highlighting slightly different skill-sets of projects). This is less critical when the resume is your LinkedIn profile or open on Careerbuilder.com, but it's valuable to note.

The format that has been successful for me is similar to Dimmerswitche's:

Skills
I have 4-5 bullets that highlight things like: communication skills, my core technical skills, areas of focus (project management, Agile methodologies, etc), and so forth.

Work Experience
4-5 bullets

Education

Ongoing Education
This area includes professional certifications, courses you've recently taken leading to certifications, etc.

is it okay for me to copy/paste my resume here for critiquing or is there a good place to upload it that I can link to?

I used google docs, but that destroys the format. I haven't found a decent alternative yet.

I'm also of the opinion that the more relevant stuff should be first. Unless you're straight out of college, education should be fairly far down. Definitely have a bullet list of technical skills & abilities(extra languages here, but probably further down unless it's something that could benefit you in the position). Next should be recent positions and education last.

Here's my suggestions for writing a good resume, as someone who's worked a touch in the hiring process at my last unit:

1. Keep it short, simple and to the point. Don't overload on bullets as others have stated; list the top 5 at most, top 3 if you can pare it down that far. Once you've done that, bullets should be 1 line, with 1 sub bullet at most.
2. Prioritize. Really make sure that the first thing in the list is going to reach off the page and grab the screener by their tie and scream in their face 'I AM EXACTLY WAHT YOU WANT, NOOB!'. Maybe not worded like that, but you see what I mean.
3. Spellcheck. Once that's done, desk check. Grammar matters here, doubly so if you're doing something where nitpicky details can bite you in the ass. Attention to detail gets noticed, regardless of what the details deal with.

Again, I really can't stress how important it is to keep it short and professional. The first person in HR that sees your resume is going to sort it into two piles. One of them will be more thoroughly vetted, and the other goes into the round filing bin. Your job as a resume writer is to grab their attention quickly and prove your relevance to avoid that round bin.

Edwin: Yours looks really strong overall, my only suggestion is to tighten it up a bit. Shorter bullets, probably a few less bullets and reshuffle a bit. Here is a link to the Tongue and Quill, the USAF's writing manual. There's some good info about tightening up bullet points as well as a section on writing a resume that's pretty solid, IMO. It's a direct link to the PDF, so be forewarned.

So, how do you list a job on your resume that you were only at for two months and left with no warning and with nothing else lined up after the job required of you conflicted so heavily with your own morals that you were unable to stomach the thought of continuing on for even one more day?

I think that the advice so far has been good, especially AnimeJ's. I also agree that if you have been out of school for a few years, education should go at the end and be very brief because it is not as important as work experience.

One thing that I was told once and always try to think about when writing a resume is that your goal is to make the person reading the resume want to talk to you. If you can include something that is even a little intriguing, it may make the person reading it think, "hey, I'd like to ask him/her about that."

Obviously you shouldn't go overboard with this -- it should not be anything critical to evaluating your fitness for the job, and it should not be completely out of context so as to stick out like a sore thumb. But if you can find something that fits on the resume but which suggests, "there must be an interesting story behind this," you may want to include it.

MechaSlinky wrote:
So, how do you list a job on your resume that you were only at for two months and left with no warning and with nothing else lined up after the job required of you conflicted so heavily with your own morals that you were unable to stomach the thought of continuing on for even one more day?

This sounds like a rhetorical question, but I'll answer it anyway...

Leave it off. Your resume should be tailored to the job you want to get... why put stuff on there that you hated or don't want to explain? Just have some diplomatic explanation ready in the extremely remote chance an interviewer asks about the gap in your employment history.

[edit]

If you're applying for a job blind (ie. without a recommendation) I suggest including a cover letter with your resume, and as usual, tailor the resume to the job you're applying for. Make the letter short and interesting. It's a lot like applying for college--you want to get the reader interested without sounding like an ass.

Here's a copy of my generic resume, sans any formatting, any critiquing is appreciated, try to be constructive though, I don't want my fragile ego shattered

Key Skills and Abilities
•Tertiary qualifications in Business Management with extensive knowledge of business practice and popular theory; specialising in Change Management and developing Business Strategy
•High level interpersonal and communication skills with particular emphasis in the areas of consultation, building effective relationships and teams, conflict resolution and assertiveness in order to resolve issues and meet changing organisational needs.
•Experience developing and actioning new procedures to improve productivity
•Experience providing positive business outcomes through recruitment and selection
•Experience improving efficiency through coaching and mentoring of staff
•Committed to continual self improvement through ongoing education and training
•Knowledge of effective marketing techniques and experience in developing and implementing marketing material
•Experience liaising with and working alongside professional bodies including Government departments
•Broad technical knowledge and experience with office equipment and most common computer software
•Experienced in using techniques to generate positive client outcomes resulting in referral
•Strong analytical thinking and research skills
•Knowledge of industry and OHS legislation
•Trained to interact effectively with a wide cross section of the community

Education/Qualifications
Institution: Business Success Group
Completed: Currently Studying
Qualifications: Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

Institution: C.I.C.A
Completed: 2007
Qualifications: PS 146 Tier One

Institution: St John Ambulance Service
Completed: 2007
Qualifications: Senior First Aid certificate

Institution: Charles Sturt University
Completed: 2006
Qualifications: Bachelor of Business - Management. Minor in Information Technology

Institution: B.I.N.C.
Completed: 2005
Qualifications: Disability Awareness Training

Employment History
Self employed IT Technician

Start Date: Aug 2008
End Date: Current
Position/Title: Casual Contractor
Reason for Leaving: Currently seeking a full time role

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Providing mobile technical support to residential and small business clients.
• Rapport building and generating referrals to build the business
• Forming Strategic alliances with businesses in related fields to value add and provide up-selling and cross selling as a part of the business.

Stella Hospitality Group - Holiday Mooloolaba

Start Date: Sep 2007
End Date: Jul 2008
Position/Title: Front Office Administration
Reason for Leaving: Made redundant due to office closure

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Experience liaising with owners, clients, body corporate and contractors to address owner and tenant concerns effectively and efficiently
• Developing and actioning new procedures to improve productivity
• Developing new business accounts and servicing established ones
• Utilising knowledge of relationship development techniques to generate business through positive word of mouth and referrals
• Experience developing marketing materials such as window plaques and flyers and maintaining the company website
• Experience with bank reconciliation and handling a Trust account with daily figures of up to $20,000
• Generating and processing holiday sales bookings and providing after sales support
• Knowledge of relevant industry legislation including the PAMD Act
• Conducting property inspection and evaluation and assessing property suitability for the business
• Strong experience with the Hirum booking system and WageEasy payroll program

Combined Insurance Company of Australia

Start Date: Jul 2007
End Date: Oct 2007
Position/Title: Insurance Advisor/Underwriter
Reason for Leaving: Unable to meet travel requirements of role (1000kms per week)

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Providing Financial and Insurance advice; conducting risk assessment and Underwriting representing Sickness Disability Plans
• Managing and developing my portfolio of clients by providing positive outcomes and generating referrals
• Consistently meeting KPI's and achieving sales targets: Maintained a Silver score: 3 policies valuing $1000 per week for 4 weeks

Triple M Radio

Start Date: Jul 2005
End Date: Mar 2007
Position/Title: Casual Researcher
Reason for Leaving: Radio segment was discontinued

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Experience fact checking, proof reading and copy editing to a high standard for national radio segments
• Experience Tele-conferencing and working to strict daily deadlines

NSW Department of Education

Start Date: Aug 2006
End Date: Oct 2006
Position/Title: Team Leader (Lithgow Region)
Reason for Leaving: Completion of contract

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Successfully completing the contract under budget and four days ahead of schedule
• Providing leadership, coaching and people development to my team
• Working with Government departments – Department of Education and Training; and working within Schools
• Computer hardware and software installation
• Rostering and payroll

B.I.N.C. - Bathurst Information and Neighbourhood Centre

Start Date: Jan 2005
End Date: Jul 2006
Position/Title: Casual Computer Tutor / Technical Support
Reason for Leaving: To focus on completion of Tertiary studies

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Experience developing and delivering technology based adult education and development programs
• Experience working with the aged and disabled
• Experience providing on site and telephone technical support

Three years experience in the Security Industry

Start Date: 2003
End Date: 2006
Position/Title: Officer, Senior Officer, Site Supervisor
Reason for Leaving: No scope for further career development
Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Managing site security and maintenance for two shopping centres
• Liaising with contractors, management and the general public to ensure uninterrupted daily operations
• Knowledge of and experience implementing effective conflict resolution techniques
• High quality report writing and record keeping
• Developing staff rosters
• Implementing coaching and staff development theory to build workplace culture
• Assessing risk for OHS Management and performing Fire warden duties
• Conducting Site inductions and testing
• Performing administrative duties and operating office equipment
• Experience performing Static / Patrol and Crowd Control guard duties

CS Computers

Start Date: 2002
End Date: 2003
Position/Title: Sales / Technical support
Reason for Leaving: Store closure

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Hardware / Software and pre-built system sales, stock monitoring
• Hardware and software installation, diagnosis and repair

Civic Video

Start Date: 1998
End Date: 2001
Position/Title: Sales Assistant
Reason for Leaving: Relocated to commence Tertiary studies

Responsibilities/
Achievements:
• Providing point of sale cash handling and customer service
• Experience monitoring stock levels and ordering stock

Professional Memberships

Australia and New Zealand Institute of Insurance and Finance Member,
Australian Human Resource Institute Student Member,
Australian Institute of Management Student Member,
Charles Sturt University Alumnus,
IEEE Student Member

Referees
(removed to protect the innocent :D)

I am just going to say that I strongly, strongly disagree with people saying Edwin needs to lower the amount of bullet points or their length. The amount he has does not seem excessive and for the work he is in, the employer is going to want to know if he can perform very specific tasks. In general, a concise, two-page resume is usually preferred, but not in the IT/IM field, where the more descriptive you are the better.

I have some really nice examples of professional resumes. I will try and find them and post them either tomorrow, Sunday or Monday.

It's regarding amount of content, it is okay to have a two page, readable resume. It's when you spill over into three pages that you need to think about cutting back.

Also, if you want to be somewhat sneaky, you can always throw in a bunch of industry terms that didn't necessarily make it into your resume. Just make them a white font at the bottom and key word searches will still turn up a hit.

First to Edwin. As a guy who's had to read hundreds of resumes, I'm echoing what a lot of people are saying in that the information in each of your Skills bullet points is far too long, to the point that my eyes beginning skipping down the list immediately.

If you're applying to a big company (or even big-ish) or any who gets a lot of resumes, you have to hook them fast. Sad but true.

Comment for Prozac and Edwin. I actually like to see education first and here's why: If someone says they have (for example) "Tertiary qualifications", the first thing I'm going to do is check their education to see if that's true, and it instantaneously takes me away from the list of skills and jumps me down the resume. I may never come back up the resume...

My preference (this is for jobs in the biological science fields) is to see education, job experience, then skills. I view the skills as a summary of the first two (i.e. this is what I can now do, after having had the previous education and jobs).

Nevin73 wrote:

Also, if you want to be somewhat sneaky, you can always throw in a bunch of industry terms that didn't necessarily make it into your resume. Just make them a white font at the bottom and key word searches will still turn up a hit.

This is also very very true. Resumes submitted electronically and to big companies go through an electronic filter and then a human resources filter before the hiring manager ever sees them. I'm not sure what the filter rate is before they come to my eyes, but 90% filtered out would not surprise me in the slightest. A lot of those are certainly legitimately filtered, but not having the right word in your resume can have them filtered out by sloppy programs/poorly defined word searches/incompetent human beings who don't know that two different appearing terms are the same thing.

kuddles wrote:
I am just going to say that I strongly, strongly disagree with people saying Edwin needs to lower the amount of bullet points or their length. The amount he has does not seem excessive and for the work he is in, the employer is going to want to know if he can perform very specific tasks. In general, a concise, two-page resume is usually preferred, but not in the IT/IM field, where the more descriptive you are the better.

For smaller companies, you make a good point. Being able to flesh it out some can be helpful. But, as Tach also points out, if any of the companies you're sending resumes to receive more than 50 a day, you want to hook them fast. Two pages kills that, sentences as bullets kills that, more than about 5 bullets per topic kills that. IMO, Prozac's resume cements this concept in my mind; I saw that it cleared a monitor screen and TL;DR'd it. There's just too much information there for some HR guy to scan over in 30 seconds and ascertain whether or not he *might* be qualified. To that end, here's the relevant quote from the Tongue and Quill, which I linked earlier:

Tongue and Quill wrote:
Getting interviewed for positions in which you are interested isn’t always easy, but a good résumé can help. In many cases, your résumé is the first impression a potential employer has of you. The way it is written and how it looks are a direct reflection of you and your communication and organization ability. Your résumé must arouse the interest of a potential employer enough to make him want to meet you from a stack of hundreds of applicant résumés for a single job. Since no one is likely to interview a large number of applicants, “someone” will scan the résumés (for about 20 seconds each), choose those that will be read further, and trash the remainder. Therefore, your résumé has to make an impression quickly to make it pass the hiring official.

I highly suggest anyone looking for solid info on putting together a good resume save a copy of it, and look through the 4-5 pages on resume building. It's all advice I've gotten from people who are out there already, and I really can't give the advice in any better wording.

I have been working on my resume the past few weeks, I'll post it when I get the chance.

Here is my predicament, last year I dropped down to Per Diem status at my IT job to go to school for massage therapy. After I graduated it took me a while to find a job and when I did the pay was horrible. I worked there for about 6 months and quit due to not making enough for the hours I put in. What I found as a male massage therapist is it is difficult to find full time work. There is a large portion of the clientele that is not comfortable with having a male therapist (about 80% of men and maybe 40% of women) That really puts me at a disadvantage when looking for a job. On top of that most places want you to have your own clientele to bring with you and places like where I was before make you sign a non compete agreement so you cannot take your clients with you.

I think the only way for it to work out for me will be to work for myself. The problem with that is I will have to do a lot of work for free at local fitness clubs to drum up business. It will take a while to get off the ground and I cannot afford that right now. I recently got married and we need a house. I still work Per Diem at my IT job but that varies from week to week whether I have work or not. And they do not have a full time position for me to come back to right now.

So in the past year I went from having a well paying IT job that I have had for 6+ years. To having only part time work, student loans to pay off and being married without a place to live together. I am regretting my attempted career change and am tiring to get back into IT.

So long winded post but my question is simple should I keep the massage job I had on my resume for IT positions or does that just make me look bad? When I get a free minute this weekend I will post my resumes for critique.

If it's not relevant, I'd drop it. Catch their eye, get an interview, and you can detail it there *if* they ask about it. If not, don't sweat it and be happy with the knowledge that you can make your wife happier than just about anyone else out there

My preference (this is for jobs in the biological science fields) is to see education, job experience, then skills. I view the skills as a summary of the first two (i.e. this is what I can now do, after having had the previous education and jobs).

This is probably dependent on field. I can see how science industries want to see relevant education first. For a programmer, I can see relevant experience being more important. I'm in the legal field, so education is always somewhat important. I anticipate keeping education at the top of the list for a while to come.

Some comments for Prozac --

•Broad technical knowledge and experience with office equipment and most common computer software

Take this out. Nobody cares if you can use a fax machine or Word.

Experienced in using techniques to generate positive client outcomes resulting in referral
•Experience developing and actioning new procedures to improve productivity
•Experience providing positive business outcomes through recruitment and selection
•Experience improving efficiency through coaching and mentoring of staff

You should give a specific example. Used X to generate X outcome for client, resulting in X benefit to company. Show prospective employers EXACTLY what you have done and why you will immediately add value rather than some generic list of things you have done in the past. Each one of these needs to be reworked. It sounds like you great skills and as a recruiter I'd like to know exactly how you improved efficiency through mentoring staff. Show me numbers. I'd be really impressed if you said "Through the development of X,Y,Z procedures, I increased by productivity XX%, saving the company X$ in labor or materials.

I assume you're looking for something business related, so I'd cut down and/or rework your non-relevant experience. Also remove the reasons for leaving portion -- if you get an interview, they will ask. It's not very standard to put those on resumes. Best of luck in your studies and job search!

AnimeJ wrote:
For smaller companies, you make a good point. Being able to flesh it out some can be helpful. But, as Tach also points out, if any of the companies you're sending resumes to receive more than 50 a day, you want to hook them fast. Two pages kills that, sentences as bullets kills that, more than about 5 bullets per topic kills that. IMO, Prozac's resume cements this concept in my mind; I saw that it cleared a monitor screen and TL;DR'd it. There's just too much information there for some HR guy to scan over in 30 seconds and ascertain whether or not he *might* be qualified.

I understand that, but I would argue that at least he should keep two versions, one to grab attention for HR and one to provide his "full experience" if they're interested. I've worked for two IT/IM placement agencies, one I'm currently at, and if your resume is less than three pages long, we usually don't even bother looking at it. The lack of description means our clients might pass him by in our database because they're looking for a specific skillset or experience that they may have but isn't listed. A good portion of my day is contacting potential candidates several times in a row, because resumes with only four or five bullet points makes them completely impossible to place, so I need to continuously harass them to add more content. HR people want quick and concise, but if he's doing network architecture stuff, then someone in an executive position will want more detail before putting him on a major project.

Also, I like how almost all his bullets explain either the purpose of the task or the benefit received, instead of just saying he did them.

Prozac, I'm not too sure, but there is a big difference between a CV and a resume. If you need a CV in Australia, then we may not be the best people to ask. CVs are much longer than resumes for example.

MechaSlinky wrote:
So, how do you list a job on your resume that you were only at for two months and left with no warning and with nothing else lined up after the job required of you conflicted so heavily with your own morals that you were unable to stomach the thought of continuing on for even one more day?

No one expects you to list your time as a fluffer Mechaslinky, in fact unless it's in the industry I don't think most want to know about it.

Good Resume Tread of Advice - http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/39900

(more)

Suggestions for handling hard questions in interviews on page 3 - http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/45498?page=2

dramarent wrote:
My preference (this is for jobs in the biological science fields) is to see education, job experience, then skills. I view the skills as a summary of the first two (i.e. this is what I can now do, after having had the previous education and jobs).

This is probably dependent on field. I can see how science industries want to see relevant education first. For a programmer, I can see relevant experience being more important. I'm in the legal field, so education is always somewhat important. I anticipate keeping education at the top of the list for a while to come.

I am a lawyer and I hire lawyers regularly. I would recommend not keeping education at the top of your resume past about 3 years out of law school. At that point it is of marginal importance -- I want to see what your work experience is.

dramarent wrote:
Experienced in using techniques to generate positive client outcomes resulting in referral
•Experience developing and actioning new procedures to improve productivity
•Experience providing positive business outcomes through recruitment and selection
•Experience improving efficiency through coaching and mentoring of staff

You should give a specific example. Used X to generate X outcome for client, resulting in X benefit to company. Show prospective employers EXACTLY what you have done and why you will immediately add value rather than some generic list of things you have done in the past. Each one of these needs to be reworked. It sounds like you great skills and as a recruiter I'd like to know exactly how you improved efficiency through mentoring staff. Show me numbers. I'd be really impressed if you said "Through the development of X,Y,Z procedures, I increased by productivity XX%, saving the company X$ in labor or materials.

I agree. Many bullet points in Prozac's resume seem to say, "I do some things well." It would be much better to see some specifics. They don't need to involve numbers, but they should be more concrete.

Good luck to everyone out there looking for jobs. It is a tough time. Remember that the problems with the economy are not your fault and everyone knows there are a lot of good people out of work. Just keep plugging away at landing a new job.

kuddles wrote:
AnimeJ wrote:
For smaller companies, you make a good point. Being able to flesh it out some can be helpful. But, as Tach also points out, if any of the companies you're sending resumes to receive more than 50 a day, you want to hook them fast. Two pages kills that, sentences as bullets kills that, more than about 5 bullets per topic kills that. IMO, Prozac's resume cements this concept in my mind; I saw that it cleared a monitor screen and TL;DR'd it. There's just too much information there for some HR guy to scan over in 30 seconds and ascertain whether or not he *might* be qualified.

I understand that, but I would argue that at least he should keep two versions, one to grab attention for HR and one to provide his "full experience" if they're interested. I've worked for two IT/IM placement agencies, one I'm currently at, and if your resume is less than three pages long, we usually don't even bother looking at it. The lack of description means our clients might pass him by in our database because they're looking for a specific skillset or experience that they may have but isn't listed. A good portion of my day is contacting potential candidates several times in a row, because resumes with only four or five bullet points makes them completely impossible to place, so I need to continuously harass them to add more content. HR people want quick and concise, but if he's doing network architecture stuff, then someone in an executive position will want more detail before putting him on a major project.

Also, I like how almost all his bullets explain either the purpose of the task or the benefit received, instead of just saying he did them.

Ah, but you're at a placement agency. If you sent a resume 3 pages long to where I was at, looking to hire, I would throw it out the moment I saw 3 pages. There are ways to write a resume that gives all that info and do it in a page, two tops if you have a TON of relevant experience. If someone is applying for a specific job requiring a specific skillset, then you write a focused resume, tailored to that.

Takeaway here is that you're looking for as much information as you can get so that you can place them as well as you can. I'm approaching it from the position of 'I have a specific need, and don't care about anything else'. Neither one of us is right, given that bit of info.

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