The Real Paula Deen

Okay, I read through Rice's defense of Deen and have decided she is pretty freaking clueless. The very idea that she wants to make this a persecution case for "overweight, white, un-politically correct women" shows that she is just as incapable of looking past her own position of racial privledge. And the fact that she uses "lynch mob" to describe the consequences of her own actions shows the sort of delusional persecution complex that has become way too common among a class of old school racists that really deserves the heaps of scorn currently burying them.

Seriously. If you can't see that calling African American kitchen staff "monkeys" is wrong, you probably shouldn't be allowed in the presence of civilized society.

The best things I've read on this issue comes from here: http://juanitajean.com/2013/06/23/i-...

I need to say something about Paula Deen and this is it.

Screw you, Paula.

Okay, here’s how Paula Deen hurt me personally. All week long I have been hearing commentators on teevee say that using the N word should be expected from “Southern white women of a certain age.” I even heard one say it was “understandable.”

Hell, no. I don’t know where these commentators got that but they need to put it down right now and never touch it again.

I am Paula Deen’s age and I live in the South. I have not used the N word since I was 6 years old (I heard it at school) and my Irish grandma swatted my bottom for saying it. I was told that words like that do not come out of a lady’s mouth and that Jesus loves all the little children — red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. I was told to say “colored.”

I never said it again. I was 17 years old when Dr. Martin Luther King won the Nobel Peace Prize. So was Paula Deen. So, if she used that word after 1964, shame on her. She knew full well that she should not be saying that.

But now, when people look at me, they think I talk like Paula Deen, but should be forgiven for it based on my age and my birthplace. No.

Paula Deen knew for a damn fact that those words were hurtful and not acceptable. My grandmother, rest her precious soul, would have stomped her said indignantly, “And she calls herself a lady?”

My friend Laura sent me this to read. You will feel far less sympathy for Deen after reading this.

So, Paula, screw you. Not all Southern women of a certain age are a bunch of classless witches.

That’s what I have to say about Paula Deen.

and my commentary on the whole issue is this:

I'll repeat again, I don't hate Paula Deen. I don't necessarily think she is a bad person. I don't even think Food Network was reacting well by not renewing her contract.

What I do think is that she was wrong to get in front of people and diminished her actions. She took every southerner and falsely attributed them with poor behavior. She belittled the impact that her actions and inspired "Hey, what's the big deal with using that word" discussions to emanate from the deepest recesses of our national id. She blundered any kind of real apology by claiming it was in her nature, and that we couldn't really think her NATURE was at fault... then acting surprised when people said, "Well, yes... we could!" She gambled that the nation would be compassionate to an old misguided woman... but she was wrong to believe that age is a sufficient apology for racist behavior.

And really, she did it for financial reasons. By professing contrition, she would likely have found herself facing losing her legal battle against her former employee. And really, who wouldn't profess all kinds of ignorance rather than lose money? Her plan backfired. She's still losing money. She's just losing more of it than if she had just taken responsibility for herself and her actions.

What's the takeaway? Maybe when you're confronted for appalling behavior, you should start by apologizing rather than rationalizing. Maybe when you've offended people, you should begin by accepting their offense as legitimate instead of pretending you're beyond reproach. Maybe when you see your half-ass "apologies" are coming off as misguided and defamatory, you should take a step back and reassess.

But hey, even if you do none of those things, there's plenty of people who will defend you... just don't pay attention to why most of them are doing it.

I think the "I am what I am and I'm not going to change" pretty much confirms that she is a racist. All that is required to not be a racist is the willingness to change and educate yourself. Is that hard? Does it really have anything to do with standing up to public scrutiny? I mean if you do it for you, who cares what others think about your motivations?

There are innumerable outs being handed to her. She is refusing every single one of them...

Nevin73 wrote:
OG_slinger wrote:
Funkenpants wrote:

The disgraced chef sobbed as she claimed 'very hurtful lies' had destroyed her reputation and insisted that she had only used the n-word once - something she deeply regretted.

Only once?

There's a two-word phrase--one that communicates doubt, disapproval, or disdain towards another--that seems appropriate here. And Deen clearly knows both words.

Is the second word "please"?

Open-mouthed, knee-slapping laughter.

Otherwise, Weswilson's post says everything I need it to.

fangblackbone wrote:

I think the "I am what I am and I'm not going to change" pretty much confirms that she is a racist. All that is required to not be a racist is the willingness to change and educate yourself. Is that hard? Does it really have anything to do with standing up to public scrutiny? I mean if you do it for you, who cares what others think about your motivations?

There are innumerable outs being handed to her. She is refusing every single one of them...

In fairness, none of them are terribly attractive outs if she wants to maintain her newfound position of poor little southern white victim. Privilege is extraordinarily hard to see and see past. Some folks just need to ride the rock sled to the bottom before they figure it out. Some folks never do.

Buddhists would say that this is a gift and an opportunity to learn and make that incremental step toward enlightenment.

For her sake I hope she makes the most of it.

Amid a wave of big time partners dumping Deen:

...Meanwhile, Deen's team rounded up words of support from nine companies the chef does business with, none a household name. Tasty Blends Foods of Frasiers Bottom, W.Va., said it was "very pleased" with the interview. Sandridge Food Company in Medina, Ohio, said it is "proud to provide unwavering support to Paula Deen."

Boldface-name defenders did emerge, however. Donald Trump tweeted that she "made a big mistake in using a forbidden word but must be given some credit for admitting her mistake. She will be back!"

What strikes me about these companies is that they have no idea what new facts will eventually emerge. Why would you give vocal corporate support to a person who may be a racist? Is it because you know your customer base thinks that all discrimination complaints are bogus and filed by "lazy, no-good, conniving people looking for a handout"?

I'm not surprised by Trump's defense of her. Is anybody?

Funkenpants wrote:

Why would you give vocal corporate support to a person who may be a racist? Is it because you know your customer base thinks that all discrimination complaints are bogus and filed by "lazy, no-good, conniving people looking for a handout"?

It might have more to do with the fact that those companies sell primarily to restaurants or OEM store brand products. In other words, they don't have people as customers. They have corporations. And this scandal isn't going to see the light of day in the food trade rags.

OG_slinger wrote:

It might have more to do with the fact that those companies sell primarily to restaurants or OEM store brand products. In other words, they don't have people as customers. They have corporations. And this scandal isn't going to see the light of day in the food trade rags.

Why would anyone pay Paula Deen for use of her name at the wholesale level? You pay celebrities for endorsement to retail customers. That's crazy.

Also, it's not like readers of the food trade magazines aren't reading general news. This story is all over the place.

Funkenpants wrote:

Why would anyone pay Paula Deen for use of her name at the wholesale level? You pay celebrities for endorsement to retail customers. That's crazy.

Because it helps your processed, canned slop stand out from the other guy's processed, canned slop.

OG_slinger wrote:
Funkenpants wrote:

Why would anyone pay Paula Deen for use of her name at the wholesale level? You pay celebrities for endorsement to retail customers. That's crazy.

Because it helps your processed, canned slop stand out from the other guy's processed, canned slop.

Does it? Assuming Deen is involved, the price of their product would be higher than the other commodity foods, and corporate buyers will be very sensitive to pricing and delivery terms. The only consideration I could see is that association with Deen appeals to corporate managers who are Deen fans. Which returns this to my original point - these companies must not be selling a lot of products to minority or non-cracker managers.

It just seems needlessly antagonistic toward minorities and non-racists to issue a press release announcing your support for an alleged racist. A very non-corporate move.

What I'm thinking is that if you're a guy who sells a lot of hot dog ingredients to Hebrew National, you probably don't loudly proclaim your love for Mel Gibson after his latest arrest.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/35WWdTA.png)

More news from post-racial America: Contestants on the CBS reality show Big Brother are caught making racist statements by fans, and people are not pleased

CBS should have pulled these cast members immediately. The longer they wait, the more it makes it seems like a major television network thinks racial and homophobic jokes and epithets on air are no big deal. The network's position that it has no control over the cast members is just vile.

Funkenpants wrote:

More news from post-racial America: Contestants on the CBS reality show Big Brother are caught making racist statements by fans, and people are not pleased

CBS should have pulled these cast members immediately. The longer they wait, the more it makes it seems like a major television network thinks racial and homophobic jokes and epithets on air are no big deal. The network's position that it has no control over the cast members is just vile.

I dunno if I agree with that last part so much. Isn't the whole point of the show that we see people 24/7, warts and all? I understand that using language like that is a far sight worse than just "warts and all", but I don't really disagree with the notion the network has no control over the cast members. I'm actually kind of surprised this sort of thing doesn't happen more.

They are cast members in a CBS tv game show. It's not a documentary or part of the news division. CBS controls everything in that house.

If a white dude comes onto Wheel of Fortune and while playing with a black guy notes that he should be allowed to spin first because, "N****rs shouldn't spin the wheel before me, Pat," I assume nobody would suggest that CBS should shrug it's shoulders and say, "Hey- that's the game show biz- not our business to censor people."

Should the Food Network have taken that same approach with Paula Deen? Just shrug and continue to make money off her show?

Funkenpants wrote:

They are cast members in a CBS tv game show. It's not a documentary or part of the news division. CBS controls everything in that house.

If a white dude comes onto Wheel of Fortune and while playing with a black guy notes that he should be allowed to spin first because, "N****rs shouldn't spin the wheel before me, Pat," I assume nobody would suggest that CBS should shrug it's shoulders and say, "Hey- that's the game show biz- not our business to censor people."

Should the Food Network have taken that same approach with Paula Deen? Just shrug and continue to make money off her show?

I wouldn't have been upset about pulling the cast members, but I see what Bloo is saying. The stated purpose of Food Network and Wheel of Fortune is not to document what people do. It's to make food and spin a wheel for money. Reality TV, while not actually documentaries, still have that goal in mind so it's not counter to the goal to keep racist people on.

As CBS had already decided to edit episodes around all those lovely statements--or, at least, not include them--I don't think the Warts and All defense carries much weight, since they already decided, actively or passively, to not present contestants warts and all.

SixteenBlue wrote:

Reality TV, while not actually documentaries, still have that goal in mind so it's not counter to the goal to keep racist people on.

This is a game show in which people compete for a prize. It's an entertainment program just like Wheel of Fortune or the Paula Deen show. It's not appropriate TV entertainment to watch people make racist jokes about fellow cast members unless you want to mainstream such behavior.

Further, Paula Deen has never used the word "n***er on her show, but people still want to see her removed from TV. Why penalize her for something she said in private but not people who make racist jokes on TV?

Also, how is CBS' position on this issue different from PAX's argument that they don't endorse the views of panelists who express homophobic ideas at PAX?

I would like to see Big Brother off the air.

Not because of the comments just... because it's awful.

That said, I'm surprised they didn't just boot the contestants. Pad out the season with more prizes or something. Or do it like Hell's Kitchen and just don't reveal kick-offs each episode. Didn't a Survivor contest (somewhat recently, as it was still when my wife was watching it regularly) get in similar trouble for being a gym teacher and saying she wanted to like steal a lady's prosthetic leg or calling her gimpy for having one or something like that? I seem to remember that not going anywhere either.

SixteenBlue wrote:
Funkenpants wrote:

They are cast members in a CBS tv game show. It's not a documentary or part of the news division. CBS controls everything in that house.

If a white dude comes onto Wheel of Fortune and while playing with a black guy notes that he should be allowed to spin first because, "N****rs shouldn't spin the wheel before me, Pat," I assume nobody would suggest that CBS should shrug it's shoulders and say, "Hey- that's the game show biz- not our business to censor people."

Should the Food Network have taken that same approach with Paula Deen? Just shrug and continue to make money off her show?

I wouldn't have been upset about pulling the cast members, but I see what Bloo is saying. The stated purpose of Food Network and Wheel of Fortune is not to document what people do. It's to make food and spin a wheel for money. Reality TV, while not actually documentaries, still have that goal in mind so it's not counter to the goal to keep racist people on.

I didn't get back to this sooner, sorry. But yeah, this is pretty much what I was going to say - it's not really a good comparison to put them side by side other shows with obviously different... "purposes", I guess? I mean, yes - absolutely CBS has a responsibility to do something other than just shrug and say "whatchagonnado?" My point, again, is just I'm not so sure "CBS has control here" is a fair statement. The article itself points out the comments were found through the live stream on the Internet.

SpacePPoliceman wrote:

As CBS had already decided to edit episodes around all those lovely statements--or, at least, not include them--I don't think the Warts and All defense carries much weight, since they already decided, actively or passively, to not present contestants warts and all.

Not on prime time television, no, but those things get "aired" still. They probably don't show the likely endless footage of dry-humping and sloppy drunk stumbling they have access to, either.

It's just an interesting question to me - the point of the show is to show these people 24/7 with the implied expectation that crap like this would go down. The amount of culpability on CBS for this seems kind of nebulous to me. I don't think keeping them on the show directly equates to CBS condoning that behavior.

CBS controls the feed, which it sells to hardcore fans. It literally controls every aspect of the house/set.

Keep in mind, the minority contestants on this show are being subjected to hate speech in an environment they have no control over. I assume they put up with it because they're used to putting up with casual racism in America, but I think CBS owes them a non-racist environment to live in.

Same goes for Asian, black, and homosexual technicians and producers that work on the show.

Funkenpants wrote:

CBS controls the feed, which it sells to hardcore fans. It literally controls every aspect of the house/set.

Keep in mind, the minority contestants on this show are being subjected to hate speech in an environment they have no control over. I assume they put up with it because they're used to putting up with casual racism in America, but I think CBS owes them a non-racist environment to live in.

Same goes for Asian, black, and homosexual technicians and producers that work on the show.

...wait, as technical employees of CBS (they are receiving some compensation during their stay there, food at least (I hope)).... can they sue for a hostile workplace for CBS not removing the offending parties?

Those offensive comments were directed at other contestants. It is now a hostile living environment. The contestants who said that crap should've been gone yesterday. CBS can say they don't condone it all they want but they haven't done anything to protect the other people living in the house.

But hey, ratings and all that.

Mystic Violet wrote:

Those offensive comments were directed at other contestants. It is now a hostile living environment. The contestants who said that crap should've been gone yesterday. CBS can say they don't condone it all they want but they haven't done anything to protect the other people living in the house.

But hey, ratings and all that.

Well, to lose ratings, you have to have ratings. The hardcore crowd may help fund through the website, but I was under the impression Big Brother was always barely a blip compared to Survivor and American Idol and such.

What, no mention of this?

Paula Deen offered six figures to endorse porn site.

Only to endorse? No Paula porn? The possibilities!

"BUTTER ME UP", starring Paula Deen.

MilkmanDanimal wrote:

What, no mention of this?

Paula Deen offered six figures to endorse porn site.

Only to endorse? No Paula porn? The possibilities!

"BUTTER ME UP", starring Paula Deen.

And now I know my nightmare for tonight.

MilkmanDanimal wrote:

What, no mention of this?

Paula Deen offered six figures to endorse porn site.

Only to endorse? No Paula porn? The possibilities!

"BUTTER ME UP", starring Paula Deen.

Surprised she wasn't already paid to endorse Boy Butter.

Please. The key phrase is "GREASE ME UP, WOMAN!"

IMAGE(http://i.qkme.me/35oclc.jpg)

...Ok, maybe that's a low blow.

[size=5]ba-doom-skiss![/size]

Sounds like Paula Deen's unaired show for ABC will end up airing on the blaze (glenn beck's network for those of you fortunate enough to not know) after all. Granted I haven't seen any press releases about it, but I walked by my mom's TV (maybe five minutes ago) while she was watching his radio show and he said he was going to air them this weekend. I can't say I'm surprised by it either.

I can't say I'm surprised by it either.

Glenn Beck doing something the rest of the media world thinks is a bad idea? Nope, not surprised... though very depressed to find out he has a channel.